Goin' to Town (1935)

71 or 73-75 mins | Comedy | 17 May 1935

Director:

Alexander Hall

Producer:

William LeBaron

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

LeRoy Stone

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Robert Usher

Production Company:

Paramount Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film's working titles were Now I'm a Lady and How Am I Doin'? According to a news item in DV , Paramount tried to borrow Cesar Romero for the male lead, but Universal turned down the deal, claiming he was needed there. DV also reported that Mae West visited the Sherman Indian School in Riverside, CA to handpick a Native American for an important role in this film. Male students lined up on the football field, where West looked them over, principally for good looks, as the part required a "looker for whom the society dames in the film will fall." Although Vladimar Bykoff appears last in the opening credits of the viewed print, he is not listed in the end credits and it is unclear what his character name is. According to a FD news item, Sammy Fain and Irving Kahal wrote a song called "Love Is Love in Any Woman's Heart" for this film, but it was not in the viewed print. MPD remarked that the best shot in the film shows "Cleo Borden's" race horse, "Cactus," being put to bed in her palatial Buenos Aires home.
       According to files in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, on 19 Dec 1934, Joseph I. Breen, Director of the Production Code Administration, wrote to Paramount distribution executive John Hammell after reading this film's first script with this reaction: "...basically it seems to be in conformity with the requirements of the Production Code." However, Breen cautioned Hammell against any indication of prostitution, and recommended that the studio change the underlined portion ... More Less

This film's working titles were Now I'm a Lady and How Am I Doin'? According to a news item in DV , Paramount tried to borrow Cesar Romero for the male lead, but Universal turned down the deal, claiming he was needed there. DV also reported that Mae West visited the Sherman Indian School in Riverside, CA to handpick a Native American for an important role in this film. Male students lined up on the football field, where West looked them over, principally for good looks, as the part required a "looker for whom the society dames in the film will fall." Although Vladimar Bykoff appears last in the opening credits of the viewed print, he is not listed in the end credits and it is unclear what his character name is. According to a FD news item, Sammy Fain and Irving Kahal wrote a song called "Love Is Love in Any Woman's Heart" for this film, but it was not in the viewed print. MPD remarked that the best shot in the film shows "Cleo Borden's" race horse, "Cactus," being put to bed in her palatial Buenos Aires home.
       According to files in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, on 19 Dec 1934, Joseph I. Breen, Director of the Production Code Administration, wrote to Paramount distribution executive John Hammell after reading this film's first script with this reaction: "...basically it seems to be in conformity with the requirements of the Production Code." However, Breen cautioned Hammell against any indication of prostitution, and recommended that the studio change the underlined portion of Mae West's line, "I was ashamed of myself for the way I lived ." He also forbade the filmmakers to show actual scenes of cattle being branded, and recommended that they change the nationality of Ivan Lebedoff's character from an Argentinian: "As you know, the Argentines are particularly sensitive about being characterized as gigolos, and inasmuch as part of your picture is laid in Buenos Aires, any such characterization would probably appear to them to be doubly offensive." On 4 Jan 1935, François B. de Valdez was hired as technical advisor on South American sequences. The film was approved on 1 Apr 1935. Breen later wrote to Will H. Hays, head of the PCA, defending Paramount's cooperation with the Code: "The studio [has] conscientiously avoided the more serious difficulties that have attended some of this star's [Mae West] previous pictures." Breen did receive some criticism for passing the film, however. E. Robb Zaring, superintendent of the Indiana Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, wrote Breen a letter of protest on 31 May 1935, which read: "I have not seen the screen nor will I. The NYT pronounces it a vulgar, demoralizing exhibition....this play was produced after the blare of reform. I agree that [much] good has been done--thanks to the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church. But what I cannot understand is how this particular actor who stands for a particular phase of morals should have been permitted to put another over on the American youth." Breen responded to Zaring by quoting a radio broadcast by the motion picture bureau of the International Federation of Catholic Alumnae in which it placed this film on its endorsed list--the first time it had ever endorsed a Mae West film. The federation attributed the endorsement to the work of the Legion of Decency. On 12 Oct 1935, MPH printed a letter from J. E. Stocker, of the Myrtle Theatre in Detroit, which read: "More pictures like this and it won't be long before the League of Decency will be on the warpath again....The League of Decency were a great influence in bringing about the making of more wholesome pictures which helped the entire motion picture industry toward greater prosperity." Lyrics to the songs in the film were substantially changed in order to meet the requirements of the Code. The chorus to "Now I'm a Lady" originally read: "I used to have a lot of sweet sugar daddies/As much as seven or nine/But now I'm a lady, I see them one at a time./I used to baby all those sweet sugar daddies/To keep my cloud silver lined/But now I'm a lady, I get my sugar refined." Breen's reaction to these lyrics was as follows: "As we read it, it is the boasting of a woman of loose morals who has had any number of men in her time, and has climbed over them to the top of the ladder where she has finally married respectability." Breen told Paramount that if the lyrics were included in the film, the PCA could not pass it. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Oct 34
p. 3.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
27 Dec 34
p. 4.
Daily Variety
4 Jan 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Dec 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Apr 35
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
16-Apr-35
---
Motion Picture Herald
23 Feb 35
p. 63.
Motion Picture Herald
11 May 35
p. 54.
Motion Picture Herald
12-Oct-35
---
New York Times
11 May 35
p. 21.
Variety
15 May 35
p. 19.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Adrienne d' Ambricourt
Ivar McFadden
James Pierce
William Beggs
Ronald Rondell
Germaine De Neel
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Miss West's cost des by
SOUND
Rec eng
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv on South American seq
SOURCES
SONGS
"Now I'm a Lady," music by Sammy Fain, lyrics by Irving Kahal and Sam Coslow
"He's a Bad Man," music by Sammy Fain, lyrics by Irving Kahal.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Now I'm a Lady
How Am I Doin'?
Release Date:
17 May 1935
Production Date:
19 December 1934--9 February 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 May 1935
Copyright Number:
LP6588
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71 or 73-75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
695
SYNOPSIS

Cleo Borden, a saloon dancer and femme fatale, signs an agreement with cattle rustler Buck Gonzales to marry him if he will deed his oil-filled land to her. When Gonzales is killed, Cleo instantly becomes a millionaire. On the ranch, Cleo tries to seduce British land surveyor Edward Carrington, but he resists her after realizing she placed a bet on her conquest of him. Carrington then leaves for the international horse races in Buenos Aires and Cleo follows, hoping to transform herself into a lady by entering her own horse "Cactus" into the race. In Buenos Aires, high society is both amused and appalled by Cleo's bawdy humor and bold style, while the Russian millionaire Ivan Valadov begins to keep company with her. Cleo bets Valadov's mistress, Mrs. Crane Brittony, $20,000 that Cactus will win, and she in turn places $20,000 on her horse, Bonnie Lassie. Lady Brittony schemes to keep Cactus out of the race, but her plans are foiled by Cleo's Indian assistant Taho, and Cactus wins. Meanwhile, Lady Brittony's nephew, Fletcher Colton, an obsessive gambler, loses his fortune; and Cleo, believing she needs a title to win Carrington, offers to marry him in name only. Back in the United States, the new couple resides in Southampton, where Cleo stages an opera of Samson and Delilah . Carrington arrives at the gala with the newly-acquired title of Earl of Stratton to swear his love to Cleo. Meanwhile, Lady Brittony tries to ruin Cleo's reputation by staging a rendezvous with Cleo and Valadov in Cleo's boudoir. While Valadov hides in Cleo's room, however, Colton discovers him and pulls a ... +


Cleo Borden, a saloon dancer and femme fatale, signs an agreement with cattle rustler Buck Gonzales to marry him if he will deed his oil-filled land to her. When Gonzales is killed, Cleo instantly becomes a millionaire. On the ranch, Cleo tries to seduce British land surveyor Edward Carrington, but he resists her after realizing she placed a bet on her conquest of him. Carrington then leaves for the international horse races in Buenos Aires and Cleo follows, hoping to transform herself into a lady by entering her own horse "Cactus" into the race. In Buenos Aires, high society is both amused and appalled by Cleo's bawdy humor and bold style, while the Russian millionaire Ivan Valadov begins to keep company with her. Cleo bets Valadov's mistress, Mrs. Crane Brittony, $20,000 that Cactus will win, and she in turn places $20,000 on her horse, Bonnie Lassie. Lady Brittony schemes to keep Cactus out of the race, but her plans are foiled by Cleo's Indian assistant Taho, and Cactus wins. Meanwhile, Lady Brittony's nephew, Fletcher Colton, an obsessive gambler, loses his fortune; and Cleo, believing she needs a title to win Carrington, offers to marry him in name only. Back in the United States, the new couple resides in Southampton, where Cleo stages an opera of Samson and Delilah . Carrington arrives at the gala with the newly-acquired title of Earl of Stratton to swear his love to Cleo. Meanwhile, Lady Brittony tries to ruin Cleo's reputation by staging a rendezvous with Cleo and Valadov in Cleo's boudoir. While Valadov hides in Cleo's room, however, Colton discovers him and pulls a revolver from Cleo's drawer. The two men struggle, Colton shoots himself and Cleo is accused of murder. When Cleo discovers Valadov's cigarette in the ashtray and Taho implicates him for Colton's murder, however, Valadov confesses Lady Brittony's scheme. Cleo then becomes Lady Stratton. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.