Mary Stevens, M.D. (1933)

71-72 mins | Melodrama | 22 July 1933

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

Ray Curtiss

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to Warner Bros. records, Una O'Connor was borrowed from Fox. In 1936, when Warner Bros. submitted a request to the censorship office to reissue the film, Joseph Breen denied them a Code certificate. ...

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According to Warner Bros. records, Una O'Connor was borrowed from Fox. In 1936, when Warner Bros. submitted a request to the censorship office to reissue the film, Joseph Breen denied them a Code certificate.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
28 Jul 1933
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1933
p. 3
International Photographer
1 Apr 1933
p. 20
Motion Picture Daily
28 Jul 1933
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
12 Aug 1933
p. 44
New York Times
5 Aug 1933
p. 9
Variety
8 Aug 1933
p. 19
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 July 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
12 June 1933
LP4006
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-72
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Dr. Mary Stevens is in love with Don Andrews, a fellow physician, but he is attracted to, and eventually marries, Lois Rising, the beautiful but selfish daughter of politician Walter Rising. Don receives a political appointment, but his marriage quickly deteriorates, and as Lois becomes bored, Don begins to drink. He is indicted for graft and leaves town while his father-in-law attempts to extricate him from the charges. At a resort, Don unexpectedly meets Mary, who is now a very successful pediatrician. They rekindle their old love, have an affair, and Don agrees to divorce Lois. When they return to New York, Rising has cleared Don and in return demands that he remain married to Lois. Mary, who is pregnant, leaves for Paris, has her baby, and returns by ship. When her baby and two others contract polio, she manages to save the other two, but her own baby dies. By the time she reaches New York, Don has resigned and has gotten his divorce, but Mary, in her grief, decides to commit suicide. She is stopped by her devoted nurse Glenda, who convinces her to help a baby who has swallowed a pin. Mary extracts the pin, saving the child, and her own purpose in life is restored. Finally, Don and Mary are both free to marry and start a new life ...

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Dr. Mary Stevens is in love with Don Andrews, a fellow physician, but he is attracted to, and eventually marries, Lois Rising, the beautiful but selfish daughter of politician Walter Rising. Don receives a political appointment, but his marriage quickly deteriorates, and as Lois becomes bored, Don begins to drink. He is indicted for graft and leaves town while his father-in-law attempts to extricate him from the charges. At a resort, Don unexpectedly meets Mary, who is now a very successful pediatrician. They rekindle their old love, have an affair, and Don agrees to divorce Lois. When they return to New York, Rising has cleared Don and in return demands that he remain married to Lois. Mary, who is pregnant, leaves for Paris, has her baby, and returns by ship. When her baby and two others contract polio, she manages to save the other two, but her own baby dies. By the time she reaches New York, Don has resigned and has gotten his divorce, but Mary, in her grief, decides to commit suicide. She is stopped by her devoted nurse Glenda, who convinces her to help a baby who has swallowed a pin. Mary extracts the pin, saving the child, and her own purpose in life is restored. Finally, Don and Mary are both free to marry and start a new life together.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.