No Time for Love (1943)

83 mins | Romantic comedy | 1943

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HISTORY

HR news items and the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library provide the following information about the production: Oscar Levant was originally cast in this film, but withdrew because shooting was postponed and he had conflicting commitments. Rita Hayworth was also initially cast in this film. After Levant's departure, production was delayed by a year and a half. Technical advisors Charles Wall and Edward Sanell worked for the New York Tunnel Authority. Paramount production notes indicate that the New York Tunnel Authority allowed Paramount to use the blueprints for the subway tunnel running from Brooklyn to the Battery. This film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Art Direction/Interior Decoration (black & white), Hans Dreier, Robert Usher/Sam ... More Less

HR news items and the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library provide the following information about the production: Oscar Levant was originally cast in this film, but withdrew because shooting was postponed and he had conflicting commitments. Rita Hayworth was also initially cast in this film. After Levant's departure, production was delayed by a year and a half. Technical advisors Charles Wall and Edward Sanell worked for the New York Tunnel Authority. Paramount production notes indicate that the New York Tunnel Authority allowed Paramount to use the blueprints for the subway tunnel running from Brooklyn to the Battery. This film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Art Direction/Interior Decoration (black & white), Hans Dreier, Robert Usher/Sam Comer. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Nov 1943.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1942.
---
Daily Variety
8 Nov 43
p. 3, 8
Film Daily
10 Nov 43
p. 42.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 43
p. 3, 9
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 43
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Nov 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Aug 42
p. 855.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Nov 43
p. 1625.
New York Times
2 Dec 43
p. 30.
Variety
10 Nov 43
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mitchell Leisen Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d asst dir
Dir New York unit
Asst dir, New York unit
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story [and contr to scr constr]
Story [and contr to scr constr]
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
Asst to 2d cam
Cam, New York unit
Asst cam, New York unit
Asst to 2d cam, New York unit
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Gowns
Miss Colbert's gowns by
Ward man
Ward woman
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dance dir
Dance supv
Dance dir asst
Dance rehearsal pianist
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hair supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Tech adv
Unit mgr
Scr clerk
Secy to Mitchell Leisen
Dance secy
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Double for Claudette Colbert
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 1 December 1943
Production Date:
8 June--24 July 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 November 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12483
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83
Length(in feet):
7,500
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Renowned New York photographer Katherine Grant feuds with the managing editor of Mirror magazine over the content of her photographs, which tend to be more artistic than commercial. When she is assigned to photograph the Interborough Vehicular River Tunnel project, she dons a hardhat and boots and goes deep underground. The superstitious tunnel workers, called "sandhogs," fear that a woman in the tunnel will bring bad luck. Katherine's distracting presence causes a nearly fatal accident for Jim Ryan, a self-assured, brawny sandhog nicknamed "Superman," who is almost crushed by a machine because Katherine insists on taking his picture. Katherine drags an unconscious Jim out of harm's way, but their work disrupted, the sandhogs are dismissed for the day. When he revives, Jim feels disgraced that a woman saved his life, and while in the compression chamber, he gets embroiled in a fistfight with his taunting co-workers and is photographed by Katherine. Jim later accuses Katherine of flirting with him, and although he is right, she coldly tells him that her boudoir chair has more integrity than he does. Katherine develops the photographs and shows them to her sister Hoppy, calling Jim an "ape." She also shows the pictures to her snobby sophisticated friends, including Mirror publisher Henry Fulton, her suitor, playwright Dunbar, and Roger, a composer, who are delighted by her foray into the blue-collar world. Jim, piqued by Katherine's previous insult, returns her tripod to her at her apartment, and regains his confidence after he kisses her and then dismisses her. When Katherine's friends eagerly ask him to describe his fistfight, Jim demonstrates and knocks out Henry. For weeks afterward, Katherine ... +


Renowned New York photographer Katherine Grant feuds with the managing editor of Mirror magazine over the content of her photographs, which tend to be more artistic than commercial. When she is assigned to photograph the Interborough Vehicular River Tunnel project, she dons a hardhat and boots and goes deep underground. The superstitious tunnel workers, called "sandhogs," fear that a woman in the tunnel will bring bad luck. Katherine's distracting presence causes a nearly fatal accident for Jim Ryan, a self-assured, brawny sandhog nicknamed "Superman," who is almost crushed by a machine because Katherine insists on taking his picture. Katherine drags an unconscious Jim out of harm's way, but their work disrupted, the sandhogs are dismissed for the day. When he revives, Jim feels disgraced that a woman saved his life, and while in the compression chamber, he gets embroiled in a fistfight with his taunting co-workers and is photographed by Katherine. Jim later accuses Katherine of flirting with him, and although he is right, she coldly tells him that her boudoir chair has more integrity than he does. Katherine develops the photographs and shows them to her sister Hoppy, calling Jim an "ape." She also shows the pictures to her snobby sophisticated friends, including Mirror publisher Henry Fulton, her suitor, playwright Dunbar, and Roger, a composer, who are delighted by her foray into the blue-collar world. Jim, piqued by Katherine's previous insult, returns her tripod to her at her apartment, and regains his confidence after he kisses her and then dismisses her. When Katherine's friends eagerly ask him to describe his fistfight, Jim demonstrates and knocks out Henry. For weeks afterward, Katherine finds herself plagued by dreams in which Jim appears as a "superman" and rescues her from an evil suitor. Jim is suspended from work after Henry publishes Katherine's pictures of the fistfight, which he stole from Katherine. After assuring Jim that she had nothing to do with the publication of the photo, Katherine hires Jim to be her assistant, hoping to prove to herself that he is not worthy of her love. Instead, Katherine falls in love with Jim, but he dumps her when he finds out from Hoppy about Katherine's true intentions. Sometime later, a cave-in interrupts the tunnel project, and Jim, an engineer by training who was working as a sandhog only to better understand the project, conceives of a plan to save the tunnel. Katherine is assigned to report on the trial run of Jim's newly invented machine, and returns to the tunnel along with a host of other reporters. Katherine resents being kept a safe distance from the work with the other reporters, and sneaks further into the tunnel, where Jim and his assistants make a trial run with the machine. While Katherine photographs the machine at work, a breach in the wall results in a mudslide, and she is buried underneath. The sandhogs abandon the machine to save her, and Jim's test run is declared a failure. Katherine convinces Roger, and Jim's friend Clancy to return to the muddy tunnel to find her camera, because her pictures will prove that the machine was actually working. They successfully retrieve the camera from the thigh-deep mud, and as a result of the photographs, the city reinstates Jim and reopens the tunnel project. Katherine insists that Jim never know she was responsible for his reinstatement, and becomes engaged to Fulton. Roger tells Jim the truth, however, and warns him that she is marrying Fulton even though she still loves Jim. That night, Darlene, a showgirl that Jim has been dating, interrupts Katherine's engagement party to warn her to stay away from Jim, and when she slaps Katherine, Katherine punches back. Jim arrives in time to witness Katherine's spunk and asks her to choose between him and Fulton. When she chooses Jim, he proudly carries her out over his shoulders. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.