The Cutting Edge (1992)

PG | 97 mins | Romantic comedy | 27 March 1992

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HISTORY

A title in the end credits offers the dedication: "For Elizabeth, Ari and Jake."
       Box critic Mari Florence saw the film on 2 Feb 1992 and Var critic Amy Dawes reviewed the film based on a 4 Mar 1992 screening. Both gave the running time as 101 minutes. The version currently in circulation runs approximately ninety-seven minutes. It has not been determined if the film was trimmed by 4 minutes before or after release.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, producer Robert W. Cort got the idea for the film while watching figure skating championships on television in 1990. He thought a skating pair was great, but wondered, "What if they really hated each other?"
       Neither of the lead actors was a skilled skater, and Olympic gold medalist Robin Cousins, who choreographed the skating sequences, noted that it was "imperative that we employ doubles for the actual skating sequences . . . Picture doubles [look-alikes], stunt doubles and trick doubles."
       The film was shot on location in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, with most of the ice scenes taking place in Copps Coliseum in Hamilton, Ontario.
       Reviews for the film were generally supportive, with Amy Dawes writing in the 23 Mar 1992 issue of Var that "this neatly formulaic romantic comedy from Interscope has a sharp enough combination of teen-oriented elements to slice out a sizable chunk of box office for distrib MGM." However, Alyssa Katz, in the 7 Apr 1992 edition of The Village Voice remarked that the film, "stumbles . . . [in] like a party guest who shows up at 5 a.m. and wonders ... More Less

A title in the end credits offers the dedication: "For Elizabeth, Ari and Jake."
       Box critic Mari Florence saw the film on 2 Feb 1992 and Var critic Amy Dawes reviewed the film based on a 4 Mar 1992 screening. Both gave the running time as 101 minutes. The version currently in circulation runs approximately ninety-seven minutes. It has not been determined if the film was trimmed by 4 minutes before or after release.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, producer Robert W. Cort got the idea for the film while watching figure skating championships on television in 1990. He thought a skating pair was great, but wondered, "What if they really hated each other?"
       Neither of the lead actors was a skilled skater, and Olympic gold medalist Robin Cousins, who choreographed the skating sequences, noted that it was "imperative that we employ doubles for the actual skating sequences . . . Picture doubles [look-alikes], stunt doubles and trick doubles."
       The film was shot on location in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, with most of the ice scenes taking place in Copps Coliseum in Hamilton, Ontario.
       Reviews for the film were generally supportive, with Amy Dawes writing in the 23 Mar 1992 issue of Var that "this neatly formulaic romantic comedy from Interscope has a sharp enough combination of teen-oriented elements to slice out a sizable chunk of box office for distrib MGM." However, Alyssa Katz, in the 7 Apr 1992 edition of The Village Voice remarked that the film, "stumbles . . . [in] like a party guest who shows up at 5 a.m. and wonders why the beer is gone."
       Liz Smith, writing in the 3 Mar 1992 LAT , noted that The Cutting Edge was scheduled to open on 27 Mar 1992 in 350 theaters, and would be one of the first films to be released by MGM under the new management team of Alan Ladd, Jr. and Dennis Stanfill.
       Titles in the end credit crawl offer the following: "The Producers wish to give special thanks to: United States Olympic Committee, Olympic Trust of Canada, U. S. Figure Skating Association, Canadian Figure Skating Association, City of Toronto, City of Hamilton, Copps Coliseum, Jalbert Productions and Hillerich and Bradsby of Canada, Ltd.; Ellesse USA Inc.; Gucci Timepieces; Karhu Canada; Inc.; Brenco Enterprises, Inc.; Greif Companies; Fila-Sports Inc.; Code-a-Phone Corp.; Gemini Sound Products, Inc.; The Ghurka Collection; Volant Ski Corp.; Etonic; Tretorn; Brother Consumer Electronics Corp." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
3 Mar 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1992
p. 10.
New York Times
27 Mar 1992
p. 21.
Variety
23 Mar 1992
p. 107.
Village Voice
7 Apr 1992.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
The Skaters, Nyman & Spindler:
[and]
Smilkov & Brushkin:
[and]
Dubois & Gercel:
[and]
Weiderman twins:
Yumez & Weaver:
Nationals pair # 1:
[and]
Nationals pair # 2:
Olympic pair # 1:
[and]
John Robinson
Olympic pair # 2:
[and]
Olympic pair # 3:
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Interscope Communications Production
A Film by Paul M. Glaser
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Post prod cord
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Head carpenter
Head scenic artist
Set dresser
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Ward master
Asst to cost des
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Orch by
Synthesizer programmer
Mus scoring mixer
Mus clearance by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR group
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Skatings sds
Skatings sds
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Prosthetics makeup
Key hair stylist
Asst hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Toronto casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Best boy elec
Generator op
Skating tech adv
Skating tech asst
Figure skating coach
Hockey tech adv
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Asst to Mr. Glaser
Asst to Mr. O'Brien
Asst to Ms. Murphy
Asst to Ms. Murphy
Asst to Ms. Sherman
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting
Athletic therapist
Catering
Craft service
Craft service
Craft service
Prod office asst
Loc set asst
Loc coord
Titles & opticals
STAND INS
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt skater
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Loc processing
Color by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cry All Night," written by Patrick Sugg, Dean Ortega, Scott Garrett & Gary Lee, performed by Neverland, courtesy of Interscope Records, East/West, Records America by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Street of Dreams," written by Carl Sturken & Evan Rogers, performed by Nia Peeples, courtesy of Charisma Records America, Inc.
"Ride On Time," written by Dan Hartman, Mirko Limoni, Danielle Davoli & Varerio Semplici, performed by Black Box, courtesy of Disco Magic/BMG Records (UK) Ltd.
+
SONGS
"Cry All Night," written by Patrick Sugg, Dean Ortega, Scott Garrett & Gary Lee, performed by Neverland, courtesy of Interscope Records, East/West, Records America by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Street of Dreams," written by Carl Sturken & Evan Rogers, performed by Nia Peeples, courtesy of Charisma Records America, Inc.
"Ride On Time," written by Dan Hartman, Mirko Limoni, Danielle Davoli & Varerio Semplici, performed by Black Box, courtesy of Disco Magic/BMG Records (UK) Ltd.
"Diddley Daddy," written by Ellas McDaniel & Harvey Fuqua, performed by Chris Isaak, courtesy of Reprise Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Lauretta," written by Malcolm McLaren & Robbie Kilgore, performed by Malcolm McLaren, courtesy of Virgin Records Ltd.
"Groove Master," written by Alphonsus Cassell, performed by Arrow, courtesy of Island Records, Inc.
"Walking The Dog," written by Rufus Thomas, performed by John Townsend, produced by Scott Humphrey
"Love Shack," written by Frederick Schneider, Catherine Pierson, Keith Strickland & Cindy Wilson, performed by Rosemary Butler, produced by Scott Humphrey
"Auld Lang Syne," traditional, performed by Rosemary Butler & Warren Wiebe, produced by Jai Winding
"It Ain't Over Till It's Over," written by Lenny Kravitz, performed by Rosemary Butler & John Townsend, produced by Scott Humphrey
"Shame Shame Shame," written by Jimmy Reed, performed by Johnny Winter, courtesy of Virgin Records Ltd./Pointblank Records
"Turning Circles," written by Danny O'Keefe & Jay Gruska, performed by Sally Dworsky, produced by Jay Gruska
"The Race," written by Boris Blank & Dieter Meier, performed by Yello, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Baby Now I," written by Dan Reed, performed by The Dan Reed Network, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"I've Got Dreams To Remember," written by Otis Redding, Zelma Redding & Joe Rock, performed by Delbert McClinton, courtesy of Alligator Records
"Feels Like Forever-Theme From 'The Cutting Edge,'" written by Diane Warren & Bryan Adams, performed by Joe Cocker, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 March 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 27 March 1992
Production Date:
8 April 1991 through 28 Junee 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 June 1992
Copyright Number:
PA0000568615
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision cameras and lenses
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
37523
SYNOPSIS

At one p.m., Doug Dorsey awakes in a panic, late for hockey practice with the U.S. Olympic hockey team. As he rushes to dress, he addresses the girl in his bed by the wrong name. Meanwhile, Kate Moseley practices her figure skating routines. Rick Tuttle, Kate’s coach, criticizes her performance, and Kate complains that her skating partner is inadequate. As Doug races through the team entrance to the ice rink, Kate’s father, Jack Moseley, urges his daughter to apologize to Rick, but Kate ignores his plea. As she rounds a corner in the hallway, Doug runs into her, knocking her down. After a snippy exchange with the haughty figure skater, he continues on, leaving Kate on the floor. That night, Doug scores a goal against the German team, but is deliberately knocked senseless by an opposing player. At her performance, Kate's partner drops her on the ice. As a result of his accident, Doug loses eighteen degrees of peripheral vision in his right eye, and learns from his doctor that he cannot expect to become a professional hockey player. Two years later, Doug is back in Minnesota, working at a factory. After work, he goes to his brother Walter’s bar, Dorsey’s Penalty Box, to grab a sandwich. Walter is short-handed and asks Doug to help out, but Doug is on his way to an amateur hockey game. Walter follows and tells him that a letter from the Detroit Red Wings has arrived. Even without opening it, the implication is clear: the last professional team that has not already rejected Doug has turned him down. At skating practice, Kate has ... +


At one p.m., Doug Dorsey awakes in a panic, late for hockey practice with the U.S. Olympic hockey team. As he rushes to dress, he addresses the girl in his bed by the wrong name. Meanwhile, Kate Moseley practices her figure skating routines. Rick Tuttle, Kate’s coach, criticizes her performance, and Kate complains that her skating partner is inadequate. As Doug races through the team entrance to the ice rink, Kate’s father, Jack Moseley, urges his daughter to apologize to Rick, but Kate ignores his plea. As she rounds a corner in the hallway, Doug runs into her, knocking her down. After a snippy exchange with the haughty figure skater, he continues on, leaving Kate on the floor. That night, Doug scores a goal against the German team, but is deliberately knocked senseless by an opposing player. At her performance, Kate's partner drops her on the ice. As a result of his accident, Doug loses eighteen degrees of peripheral vision in his right eye, and learns from his doctor that he cannot expect to become a professional hockey player. Two years later, Doug is back in Minnesota, working at a factory. After work, he goes to his brother Walter’s bar, Dorsey’s Penalty Box, to grab a sandwich. Walter is short-handed and asks Doug to help out, but Doug is on his way to an amateur hockey game. Walter follows and tells him that a letter from the Detroit Red Wings has arrived. Even without opening it, the implication is clear: the last professional team that has not already rejected Doug has turned him down. At skating practice, Kate has trouble with her latest partner, her eighth in two years. Her new skating coach, Anton Pamchenko, seeks out Doug Dorsey as a potential partner for Kate. Although disappointed that Anton is not a hockey coach, Doug agrees to a tryout. After a disheartening practice session with the antagonistic Kate, Doug is approached by Jack Moseley, who tells him that Anton Pamchenko is a world-class judge of skating talent and that Doug should be honored to have been selected to try out with Kate, but Jack and his daughter see no future in her skating with a hockey player. Jack hands Doug a check to cover his time, and a return plane ticket home. As Jack ticks off the resumes of thirty-five potential skaters who have failed to meet Kate’s standards, he tosses the bunched up documents at a coal scuttle near his fireplace, and misses every shot. Doug tosses his own resume into the scuttle without looking, and Jack declares it to be a lucky shot. In turn, Doug balls up Jack’s check, and bets double or nothing that he’ll make the shot. Doug stays and continues practicing with Kate, who humiliates him during their skating rehearsals. However, when he challenges her to play hockey, Kate discovers that the game is more demanding than she thought. In frustration, she swings at the puck as if it were a golf ball, and hits Doug in the nose. When she feels guilty about bringing Doug down, Anton suggests that she has found her new skating partner. After grueling weeks of rehearsals, Doug presents Kate with a Christmas gift of a game sweater worn by famed professional hockey player Bobby Orr, a souvenir he has owned for fifteen years. She seems not to know who Bobby Orr is, and Doug attempts to take back his gift, but she insists on keeping it and gives him a copy of the Charles Dickens novel Great Expectations, in return. At her family's New Year’s Eve party, Kate introduces Doug to her fiancé, Hale Forrester, who is visiting from London, England, where he works in finance for Kate’s father. When Hale notes that he does not like to see Kate upset, Doug suggests he get a blindfold. Although Kate sticks by Hale’s side during the party, she becomes jealous when she see Doug interacting with other women. At midnight, the party attendees exchange kisses, but when Doug and Kate come together, they give each other an awkward peck on the cheek. Later, as Doug packs to leave the Moseley home for the weekend, Kate comes to his room to give him a videotape of their rehearsals to show his family, and informs him that her father has set aside a hotel suite in Chicago, Illinois, for Doug’s family when they attend the final skating competition. From Doug’s reaction, it is clear to Kate that he has not told his family about the contest, but he assures her they will be there. At Dorsey’s Penalty Box, Walter believes his little brother has been away with the Merchant Marine, but Doug finally admits to the crowd that he has been figure skating. He later explains to his brother that figure skating is tougher than playing hockey, and he will be doing something new and revolutionary. When he returns to rehearsals, Doug rebels against the frilly costumes being designed for the team, and insists on using modern, popular music, instead of a classical piece by Mozart. At a dinner just before the finals, Hale announces his engagement to Kate, and Doug is secretly devastated. As Kate skates solo on her ice rink, she is visited by her old coach, Rick Tuttle, who suggests that Kate should have come to him if she wanted to get back into competition skating, and that she would be better off retiring than appearing in the Nationals with a hockey player. Doug overhears as Kate defends his skating to Tuttle. Later, he asks Kate to remove her engagement ring while they are on the ice, because it is cutting into his hand. At the U. S. Figure Skating Association finals in Chicago, Kate becomes jealous when Doug has a dalliance with Lorie Peckarovski, the new skating partner of Kate’s former partner, Brian Noonan. Hale realizes that Kate really loves Doug, and leaves town before the competition. At the compulsories, Doug and Kate come in third. The following night, at the long form competition, although their routine is well received by the crowd, Doug and Kate at first fail to qualify for the U. S. Olympic team, but the team ahead of them in the competition flubs their routine, giving Doug and Kate a default victory. After a night of celebration, Kate lets Doug know that her engagement to Hale is off. She is offended when Doug does not want to take advantage of her while drunk, and kicks him out of her room. Later, Doug drinks alone in his room. Lorie knocks on his door and suggests they “trade secrets.” The next morning, Kate comes to Doug’s room, and is upset when Lorie opens the door. In the face of a presumed unbeatable Russian team, Anton proposes a dramatic routine that will transcend anything done in competition before. With five weeks to go, Kate is reluctant, but Doug accepts the challenge. At the Olympics, Doug and Kate perform well in the short-form compulsories, but without passion due to their personal conflicts. Afterward a reporter asks about their coming long-form routine, and while Doug brags about their altered routine, Kate insists the new moves are not ready and will not be attempted. At dinner, Doug and Jack Moseley argue over Kate’s unwillingness to do the new routine. Kate intervenes, and takes responsibility for their failure. She had always hoped her father would love her, win or lose, but now she is sorry to have let both Doug and her father down. In the morning, Kate prepares to leave after their routine and retire for good. Before they go on that afternoon, Anton urges Doug and Kate to go out on the ice and enjoy each other. Just as they are about to go out on the ice, Doug confesses his love for Kate. She agrees to do Anton’s routine, and they go on to win the Olympic Gold Medal. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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