Hoffa (1992)

R | 132 mins | Biography, Drama | 25 December 1992

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HISTORY

       The Summary for this film reflects the ambiguous way in which time is presented onscreen. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that, “Filmmakers did not want to use title cards for dates.” Rather, they sought to convey time periods through visual cues, such as costume and production design. In a Feb 1993 Theatre Crafts International interview, production designer Ida Random stated that Hoffa spans from 1935 to 1975, with the climactic strike scene occurring in 1949. A review in the 25 Dec 1992 LAT found the picture’s lack of dates “enigmatic.”
       A 6 Aug 1982 Back Stage news brief indicated that perfume magnate George Barrie planned to produce The Jimmy Hoffa Story for his company, GB Productions International. He hired writer Robin Moore to write a script based on Jimmy Hoffa’s life. Frank Ragano, Hoffa’s one-time attorney, would serve as a consultant on the picture, with Mike Harris filling the role of associate producer. Nearly a year later, an 18 May 1983 Var news item confirmed that Barrie was still developing the project, which had been retitled, Hoffa. Although no cast was listed, Var indicated that filming would begin sometime in spring 1984.
       On 29 Dec 1989, DV announced that record industry mogul, Joseph Isgro, had teamed with producers Edward R. Pressman and Caldecott Chubb to make a Hoffa biopic for Twentieth Century Fox. Robin Moore’s The Jimmy Hoffa Story, to which Isgro and company owned the rights, would serve as “the foundation” for a new screenplay by screenwriter David Mamet. Various sources, including the 30 Aug ... More Less

       The Summary for this film reflects the ambiguous way in which time is presented onscreen. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that, “Filmmakers did not want to use title cards for dates.” Rather, they sought to convey time periods through visual cues, such as costume and production design. In a Feb 1993 Theatre Crafts International interview, production designer Ida Random stated that Hoffa spans from 1935 to 1975, with the climactic strike scene occurring in 1949. A review in the 25 Dec 1992 LAT found the picture’s lack of dates “enigmatic.”
       A 6 Aug 1982 Back Stage news brief indicated that perfume magnate George Barrie planned to produce The Jimmy Hoffa Story for his company, GB Productions International. He hired writer Robin Moore to write a script based on Jimmy Hoffa’s life. Frank Ragano, Hoffa’s one-time attorney, would serve as a consultant on the picture, with Mike Harris filling the role of associate producer. Nearly a year later, an 18 May 1983 Var news item confirmed that Barrie was still developing the project, which had been retitled, Hoffa. Although no cast was listed, Var indicated that filming would begin sometime in spring 1984.
       On 29 Dec 1989, DV announced that record industry mogul, Joseph Isgro, had teamed with producers Edward R. Pressman and Caldecott Chubb to make a Hoffa biopic for Twentieth Century Fox. Robin Moore’s The Jimmy Hoffa Story, to which Isgro and company owned the rights, would serve as “the foundation” for a new screenplay by screenwriter David Mamet. Various sources, including the 30 Aug 1992 LAT and 13 Sep 1992 NYT, later recounted the circumstances leading up to the announcement of Isgro’s project: In 1988, Isgro was approached by Frank Ragano, Chuckie O’Brien, and Chuckie’s son, Brett O’Brien, about the materials and ideas they had developed in the early 1980s. The men claimed to hold the rights to make a film about Hoffa, rights which included not just approval from the Hoffa Estate, but also Moore’s script, interviews with various members of the Teamsters union, and Chuckie O’Brien’s personal “story.” However, Isgro soon discovered that their option on these rights had expired. Still interested in the project, he went directly to George Barrie’s GB Productions and offered to purchase the rights, according to a 16 Jun 1992 HR article. After acquiring the property for $100,000, Isgro approached Pressman, who in turn optioned the assorted materials for a “sum in the mid five figures.” Although given onscreen credit as executive producer, Isgro’s involvement diminished once Pressman was on board. The NYT stated that Pressman convinced Twentieth Century Fox to pay Mamet close to $1 million to reshape the screenplay.
       Pressman wanted director Barry Levinson to helm the picture, but he also met with Oliver Stone and John McTiernan to discuss their vision for the story. Although the NYT suggested that Levinson asked for script changes that Mamet was unwilling to make, the LAT stated that the director decided to “pass” on the project. In the meantime, actor Danny DeVito had learned about Fox’s commitment to make “a serious film” about Hoffa. He expressed interest in directing the picture at a meeting with Pressman in Apr 1990. Duly impressed, the producer awarded him the job.
       Although DeVito told the LAT that Jack Nicholson was his only choice to play Hoffa, a 3 Aug 1990 HR news brief indicated that filmmakers approached Robert De Niro about the role. According to the NYT, Al Pacino was also considered. In the 28 Feb 2000 issue of People magazine, actor Kevin Spacey reminisced about meeting DeVito at Fox and auditioning for “a role” in Hoffa. Ultimately, he was not cast in the picture. A 30 Oct 1990 HR production chart anticipated that filming would begin Jan 1991 in Washington, D.C. However, various contemporary sources noted that both DeVito and Nicholson were committed to roles in other movies, delaying production on Hoffa.
       On 24 May 1991, DV reported that Twentieth Century Fox was concerned that the picture, which had yet to begin filming, was $5 million over its approved $42 million budget. Several sources, including the 13 Apr 1992 Var, noted that Fox capped their investment at $35 million, prompting DeVito to defer his salary and sign as a “guarantor” for the remaining balance, including all overages. The LAT suggested that, when all was said and done, Hoffa cost around $50 million.
       Principal photography began 18 Feb 1992 in Pittsburgh, PA, according to a 9 Mar 1992 HR news item. Filmmakers spent five weeks shooting in the city, which was meant to represent Detroit, MI, focusing primarily on the 1930s sequences. Production designer Ida Random told Theatre Crafts International that, “Pittsburgh worked really well for us. [It had a] 1930s feeling … the buildings are closer together and the streets are smaller.” Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that “Teamster Hall” and a “New Jersey Shore diner/gas station” were constructed in their entirety in or near the city. The State Correctional Institute, and the campus of Carnegie Mellon University, also served as filming locations. In Mar 1992, cast and crew headed to Jimmy Hoffa’s hometown of Detroit. Sets were built at Cobo Arena and at the Detroit Produce Terminal, as well as on a vacant lot in southwest Detroit. The Detroit Public Library stood in for a Washington, D.C., Senate office building, while the main staff room of the Detroit News was transformed into a 1950s newsroom. Twelve Detroit News staff members were put in period costume, given cigarettes, and asked to go about their usual routine.
       DV and Var news briefs of 10 and 13 Apr 1992 noted the “Hoffa company’s” arrival in Los Angeles, CA, where Grace Gilroy assumed the role of unit production manager following Harold Schneider’s departure. Although co-producer Schneider retained onscreen credit as unit production manager, comptroller Paul Tucker, who also parted ways with the company, did not.
       The majority of filming in Los Angeles took place on soundstages at Fox. However, the 30 Aug 1992 LAT indicated that a “Teamsters convention” sequence, set in a Las Vegas, NV, casino-hotel, was shot at the Ambassador Hotel, a grand establishment once frequented by Hollywood’s elite. After completing work in Los Angeles, cast and crew returned to the Midwest to shoot the dramatic conflict between striking workers and strikebreakers. The scene featured 1,600 local extras and was filmed at the Spiegel Administration Building in Chicago, IL. Production notes indicate that filming concluded 11 Jun 1992 in Chicago.
       On 16 Jun 1992, HR published an in-depth article about Frank Ragano’s $500,000 lawsuit against Joseph Isgro, Edward R. Pressman, and Twentieth Century Fox. The attorney claimed that he had “obtained a commitment” from GB Productions regarding his intention to purchase the rights to produce a film on Jimmy Hoffa. Ragano acknowledged that he had approached Isgro about a partnership, but maintained that he always intended to act as rights-holder, with Isgro simply overseeing the financing. Ragano, who had not actually paid GB Productions for the rights, felt “cut out of the deal” when Isgro went directly to the production company, paying $100,000 for the property. Isgro filed a countersuit against Ragano, asserting that the lawyer was “negligent” in securing the rights and related materials for himself. Isgro also felt that the “agreement” between Ragano and GB Productions was a falsehood fabricated by Ragano. Although the exact outcome of the lawsuits could not be determined, Ragano reportedly “received a six-figure judgment,” according to the 1 Feb 1993 issue of the New Republic.
       Four months after the conclusion of filming, a 12 Oct 1992 Var news column indicated that Hoffa would be released in 70mm, with seventy-five to 100 prints scheduled to be delivered to “premiere houses.” Although Fox originally planned to open the film on 500 to 600 screens on 11 Dec 1992, before a wider release on Christmas Day, the studio was reconsidering Hoffa’s opening date because Columbia Pictures intended to release A Few Good Men (1992, see entry) on 11 Dec 1992. Nicholson also had a starring role in that film, and for two pictures featuring the same star to open on the same day would be “unusual,” according to a 12 Oct 1992 LAT news brief. Ultimately, Fox decided to release the film 25 Dec 1991. The 9 Dec 1992 LAT “Morning Report” looked forward to the movie’s Los Angeles benefit premiere, which would be held 11 Dec 1992 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.
       The film received mixed reviews. Critics uniformly praised Jack Nicholson’s impressive performance in the title role, but noted the film’s lack of a dramatic arc. As Kenneth Turan put it in his 25 Dec 1992 LAT review, “Hoffa is exactly the same one-dimensional angry man at the end of the film as he was at the beginning.” Reviews in the 1 Feb 1993 New Republic and Mar 1993 Box were strongly critical of how the film presented biography and history as a blend of fact and fiction. The New Republic argued that, in any other circumstance, such creative license would likely invoke legal action. However, filmmakers never intended to make a documentary. The 30 Aug 1992 LAT acknowledged the amount of research Mamet put into the script, but summed up his effort as “a Hollywood biographical fantasy.”
       While a 10 Jan 1993 LAT article indicated that Fox expected a $9 million opening weekend gross, the three-day tally amounted to a mere $6.4 million. With a projected final gross of around $30 million, the movie would fall far short of the $70 million box-office goal set by the studio.
       The film was nominated for Academy Awards in the categories of Cinematography and Makeup.
       End credits include the following statement: “The Producers wish to acknowledge: Lynn Pressman Raymond, Nikki Allyn Grosso, and Remus Yazoo.”
      End credits include the statement: “While this film was inspired by actual characters and events, the firms and many of the characters and incidents portrayed and names used are fictitious.” Real-life characters in Hoffa include James R. “Jimmy” Hoffa and his wife, Jo, as well as Robert F. Kennedy, and Frank Fitzsimmons. An article in the 30 Aug 1992 LAT described Danny DeVito’s character, “Bobby Ciaro,” as a “composite” figure based primarily, though not exclusively, on Hoffa’s adopted son, Chuckie O’Brien. “Carol D’Allesandro,” another fictional character, was considered a loose impersonation of Anthony Provenzano, a member of the New York Mafia.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Back Stage
6 Aug 1982.
---
Box Office
Mar 1993
Section R, p. 16.
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1989
p. 1, 12.
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1990.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 1991.
---
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1992.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1992
p. 1, 121.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 1992
p. 6, 17.
Los Angeles Times
30 Aug 1992
Calendar, pp. 6-7, 76, 78, 82.
Los Angeles Times
8 Sep 1992
Section E, pp. 1-2.
Los Angeles Times
12 Oct 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Dec 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Dec 1992
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jan 1993
Section F, p. 22.
New York Times
13 Sep 1992
p. 25, 29.
New York Times
25 Dec 1992
p. 1.
People
28 Feb 2000.
---
The New Republic
1 Feb 1993
pp. 53-59.
Theatre Crafts International
Feb 1993.
---
Variety
18 May 1983.
---
Variety
13 Apr 1992.
---
Variety
12 Oct 1992.
---
Variety
21 Dec 1992
p. 59.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Twentieth Century Fox Presentation
In Association with Jersey Films
An Edward R. Pressman Production
A Danny DeVito Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam
1st asst Steadicam
Still photog
Key grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Addl cam op, Pittsburgh unit
Addl 1st asst cam, Pittsburgh unit
Grip, Pittsburgh unit
Grip, Pittsburgh unit
Addl cam op, Detroit unit
Addl 1st asst cam, Detroit unit
Grip, Detroit unit
Addl cam op, Chicago unit
Addl 1st asst cam, Chicago unit
Wescam op, Chicago unit
Wescam op, Chicago unit
Grip, Chicago unit
Grip, Chicago unit
Grip, Chicago unit
Rigging gaffer, Chicago unit
Addl cam op, Los Angeles unit
Grip, Los Angeles unit
Grip, Los Angeles unit
Grip, Los Angeles unit
Rigging gaffer/Lighting tech, Los Angeles unit
Cranes and dollies by
Lighting equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Visual consultant
Prod asst, art dept
Prod asst, art dept
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Standby painter
Const coord
General foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Carpenter foreman
Carpenter foreman
Carpenter foreman
Paint coord
Labor foreman
Labor foreman
Plaster foreman
Set artist
Const timekeeper
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop
Set dec
Leadperson
Leadperson
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Greensman
Prop asst, Pittsburgh unit
Set dresser/Buyer, Detroit unit
Prop master, Chicago unit
Const foreman, Chicago unit
Set dressing leadman, Chicago unit
Set dressing leadman, Chicago unit
Const prod asst, Chicago unit
Set dec, Los Angeles unit
Set dresser, Los Angeles unit
Set dresser, Los Angeles unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des and illustrator
Cost supv
Cost supv
Cost supv
Cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Ward prod asst
Cost supv, Pittsburgh unit
Costumer, Detroit unit
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Cable man
Video assist
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd transfer
Sd transfer
Sd transfer
ADR asst
ADR group coord
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles & opticals
Process photog
MAKEUP
Supv hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Supv makeup artist
Makeup artist
Spec makeup eff created by
Makeup, Chicago unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting asst
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Unit pub
Public relations consultant
Technical advisor
Public relations consultant
Asst to Mr. DeVito
Asst to Mr. Nicholson
Asst to the producers
Asst to Mr. Pressman
Asst to Mr. Pressman
Asst to Mr. Chubb
Prod coord
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc projection
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation set captain
Mr. Nicholson's driver
Mr. DeVito's driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod consultant, Pittsburgh unit
Casting consultant, Pittsburgh unit
Extras casting, Pittsburgh unit
Transportation capt, Pittsburgh unit
Police coord, Pittsburgh unit
Craft service, Pittsburgh unit
Prod secy, Pittsburgh unit
Asst accountant, Pittsburgh unit
Casting consultant, Detroit unit
Transportation capt, Detroit unit
Craft service, Detroit unit
Loc asst, Detroit unit
Prod secy, Detroit unit
Prod asst, Detroit unit
Extras casting, Chicago unit
Transportation capt, Chicago unit
Transportation capt, Chicago unit
Craft service, Chicago unit
Craft service, Chicago unit
Asst prod coord, Chicago unit
Accounting asst, Chicago unit
Prod asst, Chicago unit
Prod asst, Chicago unit
Extras casting, Los Angeles unit
Transportation capt, Los Angeles unit
Loc mgr, Los Angeles unit
Loc mgr, Los Angeles unit
Craft service, Los Angeles unit
Post prod accountant
Completion guaranty provided by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Let's Make Love Tonight," written, produced and performed by Nicky Addeo
"Hey Look Me Over," written by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh
"When You're Smiling," written by Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin and Larry Shay.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Jimmy Hoffa Story
Release Date:
25 December 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 11 December 1992
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 December 1992
Production Date:
18 February--11 June 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
21 December 1992
Copyright Number:
PA593251
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
132
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32066
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Sometime in the mid-1970s, James R. “Jimmy” Hoffa and Bobby Ciaro wait in the parking lot of a roadside diner on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Hoffa glances at his wristwatch, prompting Bobby to ask if they should leave. Hoffa scowls. A nervous Bobby reminisces about the day he met his friend: In the 1930s, Bobby, a truck driver, meets Hoffa, who encourages him to join the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union serving the interests of blue-collar workers. Bobby agrees that labor practices are unfair, but is reluctant to discuss the idea of organizing against his employer. Hoffa later shows up at the truck loading dock, delivering an impassioned speech and causing a brawl among workers. Bobby loses his job. He threatens to kill the union advocate, but Hoffa’s partner, Billy Flynn, convinces Bobby to reconsider. The two Teamsters inform Bobby about the benefits of “collective bargaining.” Although negotiating for better wages appeals to Bobby, he points out that he is still unemployed. Hoffa hires him to participate in a scheme, but refrains from revealing that the plan is to set fire to a local laundry whose proprietor refuses to unionize. Billy Flynn gets caught in the blaze and dies from burn injuries. Following the incident, Bobby assumes the role of Hoffa’s primary confidant. The two continue to monitor the relationships between businesses and employees. Hoffa is outraged to see truck drivers cross a picket line one night, and further dismayed when police arrive to arrest the determined strikers. In the midst of the chaos, a man approaches Hoffa, speaking Italian and gesturing to a nearby car. Bobby accompanies Hoffa to a meeting with a Mafia boss. ... +


Sometime in the mid-1970s, James R. “Jimmy” Hoffa and Bobby Ciaro wait in the parking lot of a roadside diner on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Hoffa glances at his wristwatch, prompting Bobby to ask if they should leave. Hoffa scowls. A nervous Bobby reminisces about the day he met his friend: In the 1930s, Bobby, a truck driver, meets Hoffa, who encourages him to join the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union serving the interests of blue-collar workers. Bobby agrees that labor practices are unfair, but is reluctant to discuss the idea of organizing against his employer. Hoffa later shows up at the truck loading dock, delivering an impassioned speech and causing a brawl among workers. Bobby loses his job. He threatens to kill the union advocate, but Hoffa’s partner, Billy Flynn, convinces Bobby to reconsider. The two Teamsters inform Bobby about the benefits of “collective bargaining.” Although negotiating for better wages appeals to Bobby, he points out that he is still unemployed. Hoffa hires him to participate in a scheme, but refrains from revealing that the plan is to set fire to a local laundry whose proprietor refuses to unionize. Billy Flynn gets caught in the blaze and dies from burn injuries. Following the incident, Bobby assumes the role of Hoffa’s primary confidant. The two continue to monitor the relationships between businesses and employees. Hoffa is outraged to see truck drivers cross a picket line one night, and further dismayed when police arrive to arrest the determined strikers. In the midst of the chaos, a man approaches Hoffa, speaking Italian and gesturing to a nearby car. Bobby accompanies Hoffa to a meeting with a Mafia boss. The man asserts that Hoffa is interfering with activities he and his associates would like to conduct. Unintimidated, Hoffa negotiates with the mobster, suggesting an alliance. Sometime later, Frank Fitzsimmons, an ambitious Teamster, approaches Hoffa after a local union meeting, and asks how to achieve success. Bobby is surprised to hear his mentor reveal some of his illicit tactics. Decades later at the roadside diner, Hoffa sends Bobby to call the Italian mobster, who is late for their meeting. Bobby goes into the diner and makes the call. Smoking a cigarette, he recalls Hoffa’s persistence in standing up for workers’ rights: In the late 1940s, Hoffa faces pressure from the Teamsters president, who is concerned that the current strike has gone on too long. He suggests that Hoffa “settle” with the trucking company, but Hoffa ignores the request, instead going to the strike line and urging the disenchanted workers to march on the factory. A violent battle between the Teamsters and the strikebreakers ensues, with the union suffering tragic losses. After the incident, Carol D’Allessandro, the head of a New York crime family, invites Hoffa, Bobby, Fitzsimmons, and Pete Connelly on a hunting trip. The men discuss forming a Teamsters pension fund, loaning money from it, and pocketing the investments made on the loans. Sometime later, Hoffa is interrogated by U.S. Senate committee chairman Robert Kennedy, as to whether or not certain Teamsters are Communists. Hoffa berates the young politician for suggesting such a thing. Kennedy questions Hoffa’s management of the Teamsters pension fund, as well as his connections to organized crime. Hoffa dismisses the accusations, and later tells the press that nothing will stop him from becoming president of the union. A reporter from the Detroit News challenges the assertion, threatening to run a story about Hoffa’s bribery tactics. Hoffa blackmails the newsman and effectively kills the story. A few months later, Hoffa wins the Teamsters presidency. His rise in power draws increasing scrutiny from Robert Kennedy, who, in his new position as U.S. Attorney General, vows to put Hoffa in jail. At a Teamsters convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, Hoffa learns that he, Bobby, and Pete Connelly have been indicted on bribery charges. Prior to the trial, Bobby is asked if he would be willing to incriminate Hoffa in exchange for a dismissal of charges. Bobby scorns the suggestion. However, Pete Connelly tells the court about the conversation that took place on the hunting trip those many years ago, revealing Hoffa’s association with Carol D’Allessandro and their scheme to divert money from the pension fund. The jury sentences Hoffa and Bobby to serve time in prison. En route to the correctional facility, Hoffa smiles at the hundreds of shipping trucks flanking the roadway. Men cheer and show signs of support for their fallen hero. During Hoffa’s incarceration, Frank Fitzsimmons becomes Teamsters president. When Bobby gets out of prison, he demands that Fitzsimmons find a way to reduce Hoffa’s sentence. Fitzsimmons shows little interest in the situation, so Bobby seeks help from Carol D’Allessandro. The gangster suggests the Teamsters endorse Richard Nixon for President of the U.S. In return, Nixon will pardon Hoffa. In 1971, Hoffa is released from prison and immediately begins making plans to lead the Teamsters, but Fitzsimmons informs him that a condition of the pardon is that he resign from the union. Outraged, Hoffa complains to D’Allessandro. The crime boss is unmoved. Time passes, and Bobby visits D’Allessandro, indicating that Hoffa plans to go the press with information about the mobster’s activities. D’Allessandro agrees to meet the next afternoon at a diner on the outskirts of Detroit. Hoffa and Bobby wait until seven in the evening, curious as to why D’Allessandro is so late. Bobby befriends a young trucker in the diner and asks if he would like to meet Jimmy Hoffa. When they go outside, the young man pulls a gun and expertly kills Hoffa, before turning and shooting Bobby. A shipping truck pulls into the parking lot, and several men stow Hoffa’s car and the two dead bodies inside. The truck drives down the highway into the sunset. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.