A League of Their Own (1992)

PG | 127 mins | Comedy-drama | 1 July 1992

Director:

Penny Marshall

Cinematographer:

Miroslav Ondricek

Editor:

Adam Bernardi

Production Designer:

Bill Groom

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures
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HISTORY

The film is bookended by scenes in which an aged “Dottie Hinson” attends the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League’s (AAGPBL) induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. As she reminisces about her time in the league, action flashes back to 1943.
       According to a 21 Aug 1992 HR “Hollywood Report” column, co-producers Bill Pace and Ronnie Clemmer became interested in the AAGPBL after reading an article in the Boston Globe. They attended the league’s annual reunion in Fort Wayne, IN, and acquired film rights to the organization and its story. Coincidentally, around the same time, Pace and Clemmer’s top-choice director, Penny Marshall, became interested in the subject after seeing a Public Broadcasting System (PBS) documentary about the league, titled A League of Their Own. Pace and Clemmer had not yet reached out to Marshall when she discovered they owned film rights to the AAGPBL, and contacted them. The three met and agreed to work together. As noted in a 28 Jun 1992 LAT article, Kelly Candaele, co-producer of the PBS documentary and son of an AAGPBL player named Helen St. Aubin, wrote a treatment for Marshall based on his mother and her sister Margaret’s experiences playing in the league. Candaele and his documentary co-producer, Kim Wilson, receive story credit on the film. However, according to filmmakers, the characters Dottie Hinson and her sister, “Kit Keller,” are composites, not directly based on Helen St. Aubin and her sister. The character “Walter Harvey” is based on chewing-gum tycoon P. K. Wrigley, who owned the Chicago Cubs baseball franchise and organized the AAGPBL in 1943.
       The project was initially set ... More Less

The film is bookended by scenes in which an aged “Dottie Hinson” attends the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League’s (AAGPBL) induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. As she reminisces about her time in the league, action flashes back to 1943.
       According to a 21 Aug 1992 HR “Hollywood Report” column, co-producers Bill Pace and Ronnie Clemmer became interested in the AAGPBL after reading an article in the Boston Globe. They attended the league’s annual reunion in Fort Wayne, IN, and acquired film rights to the organization and its story. Coincidentally, around the same time, Pace and Clemmer’s top-choice director, Penny Marshall, became interested in the subject after seeing a Public Broadcasting System (PBS) documentary about the league, titled A League of Their Own. Pace and Clemmer had not yet reached out to Marshall when she discovered they owned film rights to the AAGPBL, and contacted them. The three met and agreed to work together. As noted in a 28 Jun 1992 LAT article, Kelly Candaele, co-producer of the PBS documentary and son of an AAGPBL player named Helen St. Aubin, wrote a treatment for Marshall based on his mother and her sister Margaret’s experiences playing in the league. Candaele and his documentary co-producer, Kim Wilson, receive story credit on the film. However, according to filmmakers, the characters Dottie Hinson and her sister, “Kit Keller,” are composites, not directly based on Helen St. Aubin and her sister. The character “Walter Harvey” is based on chewing-gum tycoon P. K. Wrigley, who owned the Chicago Cubs baseball franchise and organized the AAGPBL in 1943.
       The project was initially set up at Twentieth Century Fox, with Marshall set to direct. However, when Marshall left to direct Awakenings (1990, see entry), she was replaced by David Anspaugh, but remained with the project as an executive producer.
       A 25 Jan 1990 DV article announced that A League of Their Own was one of fifteen productions recently given a green light by newly appointed Twentieth Century Fox chairman Joe Roth. Filming was expected to begin in late spring 1990, with David Anspaugh directing. Despite initial plans to shoot in Illinois, as noted in the 27 Feb 1990 DV, a 2 Jun 1990 Screen International brief reported that filming would take place in Indiana, beginning Jul 1990, with Darryl Hannah, Laura Dern, Jon Lovitz, and Jim Belushi starring. Only Lovitz remained with the project. Actress Demi Moore was brought on, as noted in a 13 Jun 1990 Var brief, and the production came within days of rehearsals, but Moore dropped out and the project went into turnaround.
       The script was picked up by Columbia Pictures when, after filming Awakenings, Marshall established a production deal there. According to a 21 May 1991 LAT “Morning Report” column, Demi Moore was back on the project, with Brooke Shields, Ally Sheedy, and Madonna, all of whom were said to be working with baseball coach Joe Russo. Debra Winger became attached in the role of Dottie Hinson, as noted in the 11 Jun 1991 DV “Just for Variety” column, ostensibly replacing Demi Moore, who received no further mention in contemporary sources in AMPAS library files. Likewise, neither Ally Sheedy nor Brooke Shields remained with project. A 9 Jun 1991 LAT brief stated Madonna was expected to play Kit Keller, although she was ultimately cast as “Mae Mordabito,” and Tom Hanks was in talks to play “Jimmy Dugan.”
       Debra Winger’s concerns about the “stunt casting” of Madonna were discussed in the 11 Jun 1991 DV, which quoted the actress as saying, “I’m afraid of the press zoo.” Shooting was set to begin on 17 Jun 1991; however, Winger dropped out around that time, as noted in the 18 Jun 1991 Newsday. Rumors circulated that Winger and Madonna had not gotten along in rehearsals, according to a 24 Jun 1991 Newsday item, although conflicting reports stated that Winger left due to an increasingly restrictive contract set forth by Columbia, which included punitive measures if the actress caused filming delays or “stepped out of line.” According to a 30 Jun 1991 LAT article, Columbia addressed the rumors by issuing a press release, stating, “Winger did not ‘walk off’ the picture… Columbia decided to take the film in a different creative direction.”
       The ensemble cast underwent rigorous training at a baseball camp run by technical advisor William E. Hughes, an assistant baseball coach at the University of Southern California (USC), which began three months before filming. Using USC facilities, Hughes worked with the women six days a week, four hours a day, as noted in a 22 May 1992 LAT item.
       Principal photography began 10 Jul 1991 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, IL, according to the 16 Jul 1991 HR production chart and production notes in AMPAS library files. While Wrigley Field doubled as the fictional “Harvey Field,” a Huntingburg, IN, community field was enlarged and rebuilt to stand in for the “Rockford Peaches’” home field, with construction done “to code” so the structure could remain in use after filming. Mayor Connie Nass named the revamped stadium Huntingburg “League” Stadium, in honor of the production. In Evansville, IN, Bosse Field, built in 1915 and the fourth oldest baseball stadium still in use at that time, became the home stadium for the “Racine Belles.” The final week of shooting took place in Cooperstown, NY, where sixty-five original AAGPBL members appeared in scenes recreating the 1988 ceremony in which the AAGPBL was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. An exhibition game was also filmed there, on Abner Doubleday Field. Principal photography concluded on 31 Oct 1991.
       A 10 Jul 1992 HR brief noted over $10 million was spent in Indiana, creating “the greatest economic impact of any film ever produced” there. Although the budget had previously been cited as $30 million in the 9 Jun 1991 LAT, production costs grew to between $45 million and $50 million, as stated in the 25 Jun 1992 NYT, partly due to actors’ salaries. Despite not appearing in the picture, Debra Winger reportedly received $2 million, while Tom Hanks was paid an estimated $5 million, Geena Davis received around $2.5 million, and Madonna’s salary was said to be “at least $1 million.”
       Columbia Pictures made plans to show trailers for the film on “Diamondvision” screens in the Minnesota Twins’ and Atlanta Braves’ baseball stadiums during the 1991 World Series, according to a 27 Oct 1991 LAT article. However, Major League Baseball observed a rule that only advertisers who had run advertisements throughout the regular baseball season were allowed to advertise during the World Series, thus making Columbia ineligible. Instead, Columbia sent baseballs, autographed by cast members including Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, and Madonna, to sportswriters around the U.S.
       A 19 Jul 1992 LAT item noted similarities between a poster for A League of Their Own, depicting the legs of a female baseball player, and a poster for Twentieth Century Fox’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992, see entry) that showed a cheerleader’s legs. Since the poster for Buffy the Vampire Slayer was released first, Columbia was accused of copying Fox’s campaign. Columbia TriStar executive Duncan Clark acknowledged the similarity but claimed it was purely coincidental.
       Penny Marshall’s Parkway Productions teamed with Columbia Pictures and QVC home-shopping television network to sell merchandise related to the film, as announced in a 16 Jun 1992 HR news item. The deal was said to be the first of its kind between a major film distributor, a production company, and a retailer. Items included baseball jerseys, crew jackets, and baseball caps. Penny Marshall was scheduled to appear in three one-hour segments that would air the weekend of 27 Jun 1992, to coincide with a national sneak preview of the film.
       A soundtrack featuring 1930s and 1940s standards, performed by contemporary artists, was set to be released by Columbia Records on 30 Jun 1992, according to the 1 Jun 1992 Var. Although “This Used To Be My Playground,” which was co-written and sung by Madonna for the film, appeared over end credits, Warner Bros. Records would not allow its inclusion on Columbia’s soundtrack due to Madonna’s “stature.” As stated in a 27 Jul 1992 Long Beach Press-Telegram item, Warner Bros. would release the song on Madonna’s upcoming album, Barcelona Gold, instead.
       The world premiere took place 22 Jun 1992 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles, CA, according to a 24 Jun 1992 LAT item. Three days later, a 25 Jun 1992 benefit premiere, hosted by New York Women in Film and Sloan Hospital for Women, took place at New York City’s Ziegfeld Theatre, according to a 22 May 1992 Newsday item. Another benefit premiere in Evansville, IN, occurred sometime in Jun 1991, as stated in a 23 Oct 1991 HR item, with proceeds going toward the construction of a new roof at Bosse Field. Columbia Pictures reportedly pledged $20,000 to the project.
       Critical reception was mixed, but the film was commercially successful. According to the 10 Jul 1992 Screen International, A League of Their Own took in $13,739,456 on 1,782 screens in its opening weekend, making it Columbia Pictures’ highest-grossing non-sequel opener, to that time. The 8 Sep 1992 DV announced domestic box-office earnings surpassed $100 million on the film’s sixty-eighth day in release.
       An 8 Dec 1992 DV brief reported that Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel were in negotiations to write an hour-long sitcom based on the film for the National Broadcasting Corporation (NBC). In addition to a “pilot” episode, NBC was rumored to be ordering five additional episodes, produced by TriStar TV. The series ultimately aired over the CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) television network, but was short-lived, with the first telecast on 10 Apr 1993 and the final telecast on 24 Apr 1993. Tracy Reiner and Megan Cavanagh reprised their roles as “Betty ‘Spaghetti’ Horn” and “Marla Hooch,” and according to a 19 Apr 1993 People item, Tom Hanks directed one of the episodes.
       Jimmy Dugan’s line, “There’s no crying in baseball!” was ranked #54 on AFI’s 2005 list, 100 Years…100 Movie Quotes. According to a 19 Jul 1992 LAT article, the line was inspired by a story conference meeting on another film that screenwriters Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel were involved in, when they witnessed a male producer lose his patience with a female director who cried. The producer reportedly said under his breath, “What is this crying? Did Howard Hawks ever cry at a meeting?"
       The film concludes with the following title card: “This film is dedicated to the members of the A. A. G. P. B. L.” Cast credits include the baseball positions of each character who played on the Rockford Peaches. End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks to: The women who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from 1943 to 1954; The Indiana Film Commission and Southwestern Indiana; The Illinois Film Office; The Chicago Film Office; The New York State Governors Office for Motion Picture and Television Development; The Chicago Cubs; The National Association of Manufacturers; Lissa August; Ted Bessell; Bill Brooks; Paula Herold; Richard Marks; Ted Nathanson; Jon-Michael Smith; Charles Wessler”; “Exclusive cast and crew merchandise available on QVC®”; “LIFE Magazine logo and trademark used with permission of The Time Inc. Magazine Company.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1990
p. 1, 44.
Daily Variety
27 Feb 1990.
---
Daily Variety
11 Jun 1991.
---
Daily Variety
29 Jun 1992
p. 2, 13.
Daily Variety
8 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1992
p. 5, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1992.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
27 Jul 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Feb 1990
Calendar, p. 27.
Los Angeles Times
9 Jun 1991
Calendar, p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
30 Jun 1991
Calendar, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1991
Section F, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
27 Oct 1991
Calendar, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
22 May 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Jun 1992
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
28 Jun 1992
Calendar, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jul 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Jul 1992
Section F, p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
19 Jul 1992
Calendar, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
8 May 1994
Section J, p. 2.
New York Times
25 Jun 1992
Section C, p. 13.
New York Times
1 Jul 1992
p. 13.
Newsday
18 Jun 1991.
---
Newsday
24 Jun 1991
p. 11.
Newsday
29 Nov 1991
p. 11.
Newsday
22 May 1992
p. 11.
People
19 Apr 1993.
---
Screen International
2 Jun 1990.
---
Screen International
10 Jul 1992.
---
Variety
13 Jun 1990.
---
Variety
1 Jun 1992.
---
Variety
29 Jun 1992
pp. 64-65.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
A Parkway production
A Penny Marshall film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit cam op
2d unit cam op
2d unit cam op
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Prop master
Prop master - Chicago
Asst prop master
Const foreman
Chargeman scenic artist
Master scenic artist
Standby scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Asst cost des
Men's ward
Men's ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus cond
Orch eng
Mus mixed by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Extras casting
Prod coord
Prod coord
Scr supv
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Asst to Ms. Marshall
Asst to Messrs. Greenhut & Abbott
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr - Chicago
Tech adv
Baseball adv
Baseball coach
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Ms. Davis
Asst to Mr. Hanks
Asst to Madonna
Extras casting asst
Chicago loc casting
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt - Chicago
Transportation co-capt - Chicago
Craft service
Catering by
SOURCES
SONGS
"This Used To Be My Playground," written and produced by Madonna & Shep Pettibone, performed by Madonna, courtesy of Sire Records
"Now And Forever," produced by Carole King & Rudy Guess, written and performed by Carole King
"In A Sentimental Mood," written by Duke Ellington, Emanuel Kurtz & Irving Mills, produced and performed by Billy Joel, courtesy of Columbia Records
+
SONGS
"This Used To Be My Playground," written and produced by Madonna & Shep Pettibone, performed by Madonna, courtesy of Sire Records
"Now And Forever," produced by Carole King & Rudy Guess, written and performed by Carole King
"In A Sentimental Mood," written by Duke Ellington, Emanuel Kurtz & Irving Mills, produced and performed by Billy Joel, courtesy of Columbia Records
"It's Only A Paper Moon," written by Harold Arlen, E. Y. Harburg & Billy Rose, produced and arranged by Don Grolnick, performed by James Taylor, courtesy of Columbia Records
"I Didn't Know What Time It Was," written by Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart, produced and arranged by Don Grolnick, performed by James Taylor, courtesy of Columbia Records
"Two Sleepy People," written by Frank Loesser & Hoagy Carmichael, produced by Jay Landers, performed by Art Garfunkel, courtesy of Columbia Records
"Choo Choo Ch'Boogie," written by Vaughn Horton, Denver Darling & Milton Gabler, produced by Tim Hauser, performed by The Manhattan Transfer, courtesy of Columbia Records
"On The Sunny Side Of The Street," written by Jimmy McHugh & Dorothy Fields, produced by Tim Hauser, performed by The Manhattan Transfer, courtesy of Columbia Records
"The All American Girls Professional Baseball League Song," written by Lavone Pepper Paire Davis, arranged by Richard H. Marx, produced by Jerry Abbott, performed by The Rockford Peaches
"Flying Home," written by Benny Goodman & Lionel Hampton, arranged by Richard H. Marx, produced by Jerry Abbott, performed by Doc's Rhythm Cats
"It Had To Be You," written by Isham Jones & Gus Kahn
"Over There," written by George M. Cohan
"Take Me Out To The Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth & Albert Von Tilzer.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 July 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 22 June 1992
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 July 1992
Production Date:
10 July--31 October 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 July 1992
Copyright Number:
PA575414
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Col by Technicolor®
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
127
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31516
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1943, chocolate mogul and baseball team owner Walter Harvey holds a meeting to discuss the state of professional baseball in his hometown, Chicago, Illinois. With so many baseball players fighting in World War II, Harvey believes something must be done to keep the sport going. He enlists the help of promotions executive Ira Lowenstein, who suggests they start a women’s baseball league. Soon, baseball scout Ernie Capadino tours the country in search of talented and attractive female players for the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). In Willamette, Oregon, he recruits the beautiful Dottie Hinson, a strong catcher and hitter, but Dottie has no desire to leave her family farm while her husband is away at war. Dottie’s little sister, Kit, however, is eager to try out for the league. Capadino will only allow Kit to come to tryouts if Dottie comes with her, so Dottie reluctantly accompanies her sister. On the way to Chicago, they stop in Fort Collins, Colorado, where Capadino meets Marla Hooch, meek and unattractive, but a powerful hitter. When Capadino rejects Marla based on her manly appearance, Dottie and Kit protest. Marla’s adoring father begs Capadino to reconsider, and the scout softens, allowing Marla to join his recruits. Arriving in Chicago, Capadino deposits the girls at Harvey Field, where they compete with others for sixty-four spots on four baseball teams. Dottie, Kit, and Marla make the cut, and are placed on the Rockford Peaches, along with: Mae Mordabito, a saucy dance hall performer from New York; Doris Murphy, Mae’s tomboyish best friend; Ellen Sue Gotlander, a Southern beauty queen; and Italian-American housewife Betty “Spaghetti” Horn. Before the season begins, the women are sent ... +


In 1943, chocolate mogul and baseball team owner Walter Harvey holds a meeting to discuss the state of professional baseball in his hometown, Chicago, Illinois. With so many baseball players fighting in World War II, Harvey believes something must be done to keep the sport going. He enlists the help of promotions executive Ira Lowenstein, who suggests they start a women’s baseball league. Soon, baseball scout Ernie Capadino tours the country in search of talented and attractive female players for the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). In Willamette, Oregon, he recruits the beautiful Dottie Hinson, a strong catcher and hitter, but Dottie has no desire to leave her family farm while her husband is away at war. Dottie’s little sister, Kit, however, is eager to try out for the league. Capadino will only allow Kit to come to tryouts if Dottie comes with her, so Dottie reluctantly accompanies her sister. On the way to Chicago, they stop in Fort Collins, Colorado, where Capadino meets Marla Hooch, meek and unattractive, but a powerful hitter. When Capadino rejects Marla based on her manly appearance, Dottie and Kit protest. Marla’s adoring father begs Capadino to reconsider, and the scout softens, allowing Marla to join his recruits. Arriving in Chicago, Capadino deposits the girls at Harvey Field, where they compete with others for sixty-four spots on four baseball teams. Dottie, Kit, and Marla make the cut, and are placed on the Rockford Peaches, along with: Mae Mordabito, a saucy dance hall performer from New York; Doris Murphy, Mae’s tomboyish best friend; Ellen Sue Gotlander, a Southern beauty queen; and Italian-American housewife Betty “Spaghetti” Horn. Before the season begins, the women are sent to a charm and beauty school, and told that smoking, drinking, and romantic dalliances are forbidden. Walter Harvey meets with Jimmy Dugan, a former professional baseball player whose career was cut short by an alcohol-fueled injury. Although Dugan is still a drunk, Harvey hires him to manage the Rockford Peaches. Dugan does not take women’s baseball seriously but takes the job because he needs the money. On his first day, he stumbles into the women’s locker room and urinates in front of the women. Seeing that he is too drunk to manage the team, Dottie takes over and assigns field positions. Hardly any spectators show up for the Peaches’ first game, and those who do heckle the female players. In the dugout, Dugan drunkenly chews tobacco while, without his help, the team wins. On the bus ride to their first away game, the Peaches are joined by player Evelyn Gardner’s bratty son, Stillwell, whose bad behavior causes the bus driver to quit. A drunken Dugan is forced to drive the bus the rest of the way. That night, several of the women sneak out to a roadhouse, where Mae Mordabito’s dancing attracts a crowd, and Marla Hooch gets drunk and sings with the band. Dottie comes to collect the women when she hears Ira Lowenstein is on his way. A lovesick suitor named Nelson offers Marla a ride home, and Dottie allows them to drive separately. The next day, Dugan takes an interest in game play when he notices Dottie signaling Marla to bunt. He sends Marla a conflicting signal to “swing away,” and reminds Dottie that he is the manager of the team. At another game, Dugan yells at Evelyn Gardner for making a bad throw. As Evelyn bursts into tears, Dugan loses his temper and shouts, “There’s no crying in baseball!” The umpire intervenes and throws Dugan out of the game when the manager insults him. Before a game between the Rockford Peaches and the Racine Bells, Lowenstein announces a reporter and photographer from Life magazine are there, as he is trying to interest them in a story about Dottie, whom he has dubbed “the Queen of Diamonds.” Warning that Walter Harvey might shut down the league due to paltry ticket sales, Lowenstein asks Dottie to play spectacularly. She remembers his request when running to catch a pop fly, and does a dancer’s split as she catches the ball. A photograph of the stunt makes the cover of Life magazine. The league gains in popularity, drawing crowds of enlisted men who ogle the players in their short-skirted uniforms. One night, Dugan bonds with Dottie on the team bus. She tells him that her husband, Bob, is fighting in Italy, but she has not received a letter in three weeks. Dugan assures her he is not dead, or else she would have received a telegram. He starts to take a swig from a flask, but Dottie stops him and gives him a soda to drink, instead. The next day, Kit grows tired while pitching, but objects when Dugan wants to take her out of the game. Dottie backs his decision, angering her sister even more. Fed up with being eclipsed by Dottie’s good looks and talent, Kit accuses her sister of holding her back. Dottie stays behind in the locker room that night. Ira Lowenstein finds her alone, and she announces she is leaving the team. Lowenstein tells her she cannot go. Later, Kit learns she has been traded to the Racine Belles. Assuming her sister is responsible, she attacks Dottie, but Dottie says she requested to be traded herself. The next day, Kit has already left for Racine when a telegram is delivered to Betty “Spaghetti” Horn, informing her that her husband was killed in combat. To Dottie’s relief, her husband, Bob, who was discharged from the army after being shot in the leg, shows up in Rockford. The next morning, the Peaches board a bus to Racine, where they will face off against the Racine Belles in the first game of the AAGPBL World Series. Dottie tells Dugan she is leaving the team and returning to Oregon with her husband. Although she claims baseball is unimportant to her, Dugan does not believe it. He regrets giving up his career for drinking, and worries she will have similar regrets. Dottie insists that she and Dugan are different, and leaves. Now playing for the Racine Belles, Kit faces her old teammates in the World Series. Each team wins three games, leading to a seventh and final game, in which Dottie shows up to play. When Rockford leads 2-1 in the ninth inning, Kit is frustrated to the point of tears. However, at bat, she hits a ball deep into the outfield and runs toward home plate. She charges at Dottie just as she catches the ball. The two collide, and Dottie drops the ball, allowing Kit to score the winning run. Kit is ecstatic and hailed as a champion by her teammates. Although Dottie feels badly for letting down the Peaches, she is happy for her sister. Outside the locker room, Dottie offers her a ride home to Oregon, but Kit plans to stay in Racine and get a job, and is surprised to hear Dottie will not be returning next season. Dottie says she will miss Kit, and the sisters share a tearful embrace. Outside the stadium, Dugan informs Dottie that he was offered a position coaching a men’s team in Wichita, Kansas, but he turned it down to stay with the Rockford Peaches. Many years later, at the urging of her adult daughter, an aged Dottie attends a reunion in Cooperstown, New York, where she and fellow players from the AAGPBL, which existed from 1943-1954, are inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Dottie, who is grieving the recent death of her husband, is happily reunited with her sister, Kit, Mae Mordabito, Doris Murphy, Marla Hooch, and many others, and the original Rockford Peaches gather to have their picture taken. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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