Patriot Games (1992)

R | 117 mins | Drama | 5 June 1992

Director:

Phillip Noyce

Cinematographer:

Donald M. McAlpine

Production Designer:

Joseph Nemec, III

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

Following the success of The Hunt for Red October (1990, see entry), Paramount Pictures paid $2.5 million for the rights to two additional Tom Clancy novels, Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger (1994, see entry), featuring the “Jack Ryan” character, according to the 27 Jul 1990 Publishers Weekly,
       The Hunt for Red October screenwriter Donald Stewart was hired to adapt Patriot Games, and shares screenplay credit with W. Peter Iliff. The Hunt for Red October director, John McTiernan, was also considered for Patriot Games, but he did not participate in the project. The 2 Sep 1991 Var reported that Walter Hill, John Badham and Kevin Reynolds were among the directors considered. The 28 Aug 1991 DV reported John Badham was in negotiations to direct the film, but he and the studio could not reach a deal on his fee, and director Phillip Noyce signed on.
       The 26 Nov 1990 Var reported that negotiations were underway with The Hunt for Red October actor Alec Baldwin to reprise the role of Jack Ryan. However, articles in the 28 Aug 1991 DV, the 28 Aug 1991 HR and the 2 Sep 1991 Var, reported that the start of principal photography was pushed from Sep 1991 to Nov 1991, and the altered schedule conflicted with Baldwin’s plans to appear in the Broadway play A Streetcar Named Desire. When Baldwin exited the film project, and Paramount offered a reported $9 million deal to Harrison Ford. ... More Less

Following the success of The Hunt for Red October (1990, see entry), Paramount Pictures paid $2.5 million for the rights to two additional Tom Clancy novels, Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger (1994, see entry), featuring the “Jack Ryan” character, according to the 27 Jul 1990 Publishers Weekly,
       The Hunt for Red October screenwriter Donald Stewart was hired to adapt Patriot Games, and shares screenplay credit with W. Peter Iliff. The Hunt for Red October director, John McTiernan, was also considered for Patriot Games, but he did not participate in the project. The 2 Sep 1991 Var reported that Walter Hill, John Badham and Kevin Reynolds were among the directors considered. The 28 Aug 1991 DV reported John Badham was in negotiations to direct the film, but he and the studio could not reach a deal on his fee, and director Phillip Noyce signed on.
       The 26 Nov 1990 Var reported that negotiations were underway with The Hunt for Red October actor Alec Baldwin to reprise the role of Jack Ryan. However, articles in the 28 Aug 1991 DV, the 28 Aug 1991 HR and the 2 Sep 1991 Var, reported that the start of principal photography was pushed from Sep 1991 to Nov 1991, and the altered schedule conflicted with Baldwin’s plans to appear in the Broadway play A Streetcar Named Desire. When Baldwin exited the film project, and Paramount offered a reported $9 million deal to Harrison Ford. According to the 15 Jun 1992 HR, producers Mace Neufeld and Robert Rehme had approached Ford regarding the Jack Ryan role in The Hunt for Red October, but he turned them down. Ford liked the Patriot Games script, and, as noted in the 12 Sep 1991 DV, he signed a deal with Paramount to star in three films featuring the Jack Ryan character. In addition to the already purchased Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger, Paramount expected to acquire the rights to Clancy’s next Jack Ryan novel, The Sum of All Fears (2002, see entry). Paramount president David Kirkpatick would not divulge the details of Ford’s agreement, but did acknowledge that Ford had “back-end participation.”
       The 28 Aug 1991 DV reported that the Jack Ryan franchise was a priority for Paramount Pictures chairman Brandon Tartikoff. The initial budget for the film was $28 million. However, additional locations and special effects sequences increased the costs, and Tartikoff raised the budget to $35 million. The 28 Aug 1991 HR speculated that Ford’s reported $9 million salary would bring the cost to $44 million. The 23 May 1992 LAT noted the film’s budget was $40 million.
       A 17 Dec 1991 HR production chart reported principal photography began 2 Nov 1991, with locations in London, England, Los Angeles, CA, and Maryland. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that production began at various locations throughout London, as well as Pinewood Studios. The production next moved to Annapolis, MD, to film at the U.S. Naval Academy, and then to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in Langley, VA. According to an article in the 14 Jun 1992 LAT, the filmmakers were granted “unprecedented cooperation” from the CIA. Producers received permission to film a scene inside the lobby of the CIA headquarters, marking the first time the CIA allowed a feature film crew to shoot inside the building. Peter Earnest, the CIA’s chief of media relations, stated that the agency did not usually comment on books and films, and its cooperation with the filmmakers should not be inferred as a CIA “stamp of approval.” In CA, locations included the Mojave Desert, the Los Angeles area, and the sound stages at Paramount Pictures. The exterior of the Ryan family home was built near rocky cliffs in what was formerly Marineland Park in Palos Verdes, CA.
       An article in the 30 Apr 1992 LAT reported that test audiences found the film’s ending to be ambiguous, and Paramount planned to reshoot the ending. At that time, the budget had increased to approximately $42 million and the reshoots would add a few million dollars. Reportedly, scenes were also edited to clarify the plotline. The film’s final budget, including the cost of marketing, was expected to be $65 million.
       As tracked in articles in the 9 Dec 1991 HR, the 23 May 1992 LAT, the 26 May 1992 HR, and the 30 Apr 1992 LAT, novelist Tom Clancy publicly criticized the casting of Harrison Ford, the script, and the production. He insisted the screenplay did not accurately reflect his novel, and that only one scene paralleled his book. He was also highly critical of the script’s technical inaccuracies. Clancy “disowned” the film and claimed he would never work with Paramount again. However, Brandon Tartikoff met with Clancy on 15 May 1992 to resolve the issue prior to the film’s 5 Jun 1992 opening. After viewing a rough cut of the film, Clancy stated that there were “some good things in the movie,” and was impressed with the film’s depiction of the CIA and its intelligence process. Clancy credited Tartikoff for achieving a “real peace,” which would allow him to work closely with Paramount on Clear and Present Danger, the next film in the franchise.
       One week after Patriot Games was released on 5 Jun 1992, the 12 Jun 1992 HR reported a box-office gross of $18.5 million, ranking it as the third biggest opening of the year-to-date, following Lethal Weapon 3 and Alien 3 (1992, see entries).
       Controversy arose following the negative 3 Jun 1992 DV review written by Joseph McBride. The review claimed Patriot Games was a “right-wing cartoon of the British-Irish political situation” that was slanted toward the British, and was “morally repugnant… ultra-violent, fascistic, blatantly anti-Irish.” According to the 10 Jun 1992 LAT, Paramount objected that the review overstepped its purpose of evaluating artistic merits and box-office potential. Paramount Pictures declared it was temporarily suspending the purchase of trade advertisements in Var, reflecting the studio’s suspension of advertising in the HR since Feb 1992 as a protest against a series of “inaccurate” articles about the marketing of Juice (1992, see entry). Articles in the 11 Jun 1992 HR, the 11 Jun 1992 LAT, and the 14 Jun 1992 NYT reported that Var editorial director, Peter Bart, wrote a letter to Paramount executives declaring that McBride’s review was “unprofessional,” and promised he would no longer review Paramount films. Bart was also critical of the political opinions in McBride’s review. In an interview with the LAT, Bart declared his letter was not an apology, but a “bit of friendly jousting” with Paramount Communications chief executive officer, Martin Davis. However, the DV staff was reportedly upset with Bart’s letter, and McBride claimed to be “puzzled” by Bart’s actions because he had approved the review prior to its publication. In addition, McBride was upset by Bart’s insinuation that his Irish-American ethnicity affected his ability to professionally review certain films. As noted in the 18 Jun 1992 LAT, the National Society of Film Critics supported McBride, issuing a statement that declared its objection to “the aspersions cast by Var against its staff reviewer,” and the implication that McBride’s ethnicity and political beliefs would hamper his professionalism. The Society noted that “honest, opinionated criticism” can only occur in an environment free of executive decrees and advertising pressure.
       End credits include the following statements: “Filmed on location: Pinewood Studios and Annapolis, MD and California,” and, “The producers wish to thank: Department of Defense; Department of the Navy; United States Naval Academy; the Brigade of Midshipmen; U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management; the California Film Commission; prerecorded videotape supplied by CNN, Cable News Network, Inc.; computer equipment provided by Data General; “The Cat In The Hat” written by Dr. Seuss ©1985 used by permission; Denne and Wanda Petitclerc, The Richard’s Corporation; Shannon Distributers (Ireland) Ltd.; Monaghan Company, Scottsdale, Arizona; Nigel Wooll.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Aug 1991
p. 1, 12.
Daily Variety
12 Sep 1991
p. 1, 12.
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1992.
---
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1991
p. 1, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1992
p. 4, 58.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jun 1992
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 1992
p. 3, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Apr 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1992
Section F, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
5 Jun 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jun 1992
Section F, pp. 2-3.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jun 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1992
p. 13, 17.
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1992.
---
New York Times
5 Jun 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
14 Jun 1992.
---
Publishers Weekly
27 Jul 1990.
---
Variety
26 Nov 1990.
---
Variety
2 Sep 1991.
---
Variety
8 Jun 1992
p. 50.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
and
as Paddy O'Neil
Theodore Raimi
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Mace Neufeld and Robert Rehme Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Prod mgr, U.K. crew
Asst dir, U.K. crew
Asst dir, U.K. crew
Asst dir, U.K. crew
Asst dir - 2d unit, U.K. crew
Asst dir - 2d unit, U.K. crew
Asst dir - 2d unit, U.K. crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
2d asst photog
Still photog
Video asst op
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Grip
2d unit dir of photog
1st asst photog, 2d unit
2d asst photog, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
1st company grip, 2d unit
Dir of photog, U.K. crew
Dir of photog, U.K. crew
Cam op, U.K. crew
1st asst photog, U.K. crew
1st asst photog, U.K. crew
Still photog, U.K. crew
Video coord, U.K. crew
Chief lighting tech, U.K. crew
Musco light tech
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Illustrator
Art dept coord
Art dir, U.K. crew
Asst art dir, U.K. crew
Storyboard artist, U.K. crew
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed - London
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Leadperson
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Const asst
Paint foreperson
Scenic painter
Set dresser, U.K. crew
Prop master, U.K. crew
Prop buyer, U.K. crew
Const coord, U.K. crew
Const foreperson, U.K. crew
Const foreperson, U.K. crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Cost supv, U.K. crew
Costumer, U.K. crew
Costumer, U.K. crew
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus ed
Addl orchs by
Orch contractor
Mus preparation
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Utility sd
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Addl sd eff by
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, U.K. crew
Boom op, U.K. crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff supv, U.K. crew
Spec eff tech, U.K. crew
Spec eff tech, U.K. crew
Spec eff tech, U.K. crew
Spec eff tech, U.K. crew
Visual eff and video displays by
Visual eff and video displays by, Video Image
Visual eff and video displays by, Video Image
Visual eff and video displays by, Video Image
Visual eff and video displays by, Video Image
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image process coord
Process compositing by
Title des
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Ms. Archer's hairstylist
Makeup artist, U.K. crew
Makeup artist, U.K. crew
Hairstylist, U.K. crew
Hairstylist, U.K. crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Casting U.K. and Ireland
Casting U.K. and Ireland
Scr supv
Mr. Noyce's assoc
Unit pub
Scr supv, 2d unit
Voice casting
Prod auditor
Asst prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Asst loc mgr
Locs asst
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Government relations
Asst to Mr. Neufeld
Asst to Mr. Rehme
Asst to Mr. Ford
Casting assoc
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Const accountant
Craft service
Craft service
Prod accountant, U.K. crew
Loc mgr, U.K. crew
Loc mgr, U.K. crew
Prod coord, U.K. crew
Police liaison, U.K. crew
Prod office asst, U.K. crew
Prod office asst, U.K. crew
Wescam aerial services provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord, U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
U.K. stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Patriot Games by Tom Clancy (New York, 1987).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Washington Post March," by John Philip Sousa
"The Pride Of Our Land," by Padraig & Noel Duggan, performed by Blended Spirits
"Harry's Game," by P. Brennan, performed by Clannad, courtesy of BMG Records (UK) Limited
+
SONGS
"Washington Post March," by John Philip Sousa
"The Pride Of Our Land," by Padraig & Noel Duggan, performed by Blended Spirits
"Harry's Game," by P. Brennan, performed by Clannad, courtesy of BMG Records (UK) Limited
Vocal accompanist to score Maggie Boyle, Maggie Boyle performs courtesy of Run River Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 June 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 5 June 1992
New York opening: week of 5 June 1992
Production Date:
began 2 November 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
28 July 1992
Copyright Number:
PA576790
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31598
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jack Ryan, an instructor at the U.S. Naval Academy, is asked to speak at the Royal Naval Academy in London, England, and brings along his wife, Cathy, and their daughter, Sally, for a vacation. When a group of Irish terrorists attack the convoy of Lord Holmes and his family, Jack thwarts the kidnapping attempt. He is shot by Patrick “Paddy Boy” Miller, and fires back, killing the young man. Although several terrorists escape, Jack captures Sean Miller, Patrick’s younger brother. As Jack recuperates from his wounds, Miller refuses to speak to his interrogators. At a pub, Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader Jimmy O’Reardon meets Miller’s cohort, Kevin O’Donnell, to express the IRA’s anger about the unauthorized attack against a member of the royal family. Kevin insists that kidnapping a royal will attract attention to their cause, but Jimmy argues it will turn public opinion against them. Later, Kevin’s girl friend, Annette, lures the unsuspecting Jimmy to her room and shoots him dead. When Jack arrives to testify at Sean Miller’s trial, he is thanked by Lord Holmes and his assistant, Jeffrey Watkins. For his heroism, Jack will be awarded the title of Knight Commander of Victorian Order (KCVO). After the testimony, Miller vows vengeance against Jack for killing his brother. When Jack and his family return home to Maryland, Cathy discovers she is pregnant with their second child. Back in England, Miller is transported to prison as Kevin, Annette, and their crew ambush the convoy and free him. Admiral Greer and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer Marty Cantor inform Jack of Miller’s escape. Although they do not believe Miller poses a threat, Greer asks if Jack is interested in ... +


Jack Ryan, an instructor at the U.S. Naval Academy, is asked to speak at the Royal Naval Academy in London, England, and brings along his wife, Cathy, and their daughter, Sally, for a vacation. When a group of Irish terrorists attack the convoy of Lord Holmes and his family, Jack thwarts the kidnapping attempt. He is shot by Patrick “Paddy Boy” Miller, and fires back, killing the young man. Although several terrorists escape, Jack captures Sean Miller, Patrick’s younger brother. As Jack recuperates from his wounds, Miller refuses to speak to his interrogators. At a pub, Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader Jimmy O’Reardon meets Miller’s cohort, Kevin O’Donnell, to express the IRA’s anger about the unauthorized attack against a member of the royal family. Kevin insists that kidnapping a royal will attract attention to their cause, but Jimmy argues it will turn public opinion against them. Later, Kevin’s girl friend, Annette, lures the unsuspecting Jimmy to her room and shoots him dead. When Jack arrives to testify at Sean Miller’s trial, he is thanked by Lord Holmes and his assistant, Jeffrey Watkins. For his heroism, Jack will be awarded the title of Knight Commander of Victorian Order (KCVO). After the testimony, Miller vows vengeance against Jack for killing his brother. When Jack and his family return home to Maryland, Cathy discovers she is pregnant with their second child. Back in England, Miller is transported to prison as Kevin, Annette, and their crew ambush the convoy and free him. Admiral Greer and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer Marty Cantor inform Jack of Miller’s escape. Although they do not believe Miller poses a threat, Greer asks if Jack is interested in rejoining the CIA to investigate, but he declines. Meanwhile, the Irish terrorists travel to a remote desert camp in North Africa so that Kevin and Annette can train their followers to pursue Lord Holmes again. However, Miller is preoccupied with his plan for revenge, and sends one of his men to attack Jack at the U.S. Naval Academy. Jack kills the assailant and catches a glimpse of Annette as she drives away. Across town, Cathy picks up Sally from school, unaware that Sean Miller is following them. Jack frantically calls his wife on her car telephone and she picks up just as Miller opens fire, crashing the car. They survive, but Sally is hospitalized with serious injuries. Outside the hospital, IRA representative Paddy O’Neil tells the press that the IRA is not responsible for the attack. Jack demands that Admiral Greer and Marty Cantor let him back into the CIA to investigate, and they agree. He studies the accumulated research detailing Jimmy O’Reardon’s death, and theorizes that Miller is part of an ultra-violent faction that his split from the IRA. Elsewhere, Miller and Annette rejoin Kevin at the North African training facility, and Miller is furious to learn that Cathy and Sally survived the crash. He telephones Jack at home, taunting him about the accident and threatening to return. Jack confronts Paddy O’Neil at a local Irish bar. Paddy declares the IRA was not behind Cathy’s accident, but Jack threatens to publicly blame them if he refuses to help stop the splinter group. Later, Paddy slips him information revealing that Annette is actually an Englishwoman, and obtains her contact details through Dennis Cooley, a rare book dealer. Cooley escapes before authorities can catch him, and travels to North Africa. Jack discovers the camp’s location, and the CIA uses surveillance satellites to covertly track the rebels’ activities. Lord Holmes plans to travel to the U.S. to present Jack’s award, but his schedule coincides with Sally’s homecoming, so Jack invites Lord Holmes and his assistant, to join them at home. Meanwhile, the terrorists learn of Lord Holmes’s schedule and plan their next attack. Cooley wants to join them, but Miller shoots him dead. When satellites confirm the camp is the terrorists’ headquarters, the CIA launches an attack. Cooley’s body is found, but identification of the other bodies will require more time. Later, Sally returns to the Ryan’s waterfront home, and the celebration dinner includes Lord Holmes, Watkins, and Jack’s Naval Academy colleague, Robby, and his wife. A storm extinguishes the lights, but Jack notices the boathouse is still illuminated, and enlists Robby to investigate. They discover Watkins has murdered one of the guards. Watkins reveals he is a traitor and worked with the terrorists to set up the kidnapping of Lord Holmes. He intends to kill the Ryans, take Holmes hostage, and escape in two boats waiting in the water outside. However, as the terrorists descend on the Ryan’s home, they are outwitted by Jack and his friends and family. Jack’s group escapes and hides, while Jack jumps into a boat and speeds away, creating a diversion. Miller, Kevin, and Annette give chase in the second boat. When Kevin realizes Jack is alone, he insists their priority is to capture Lord Holmes. Miller ignores the order, and kills both Kevin and Annette. He jumps onto Jack’s boat, engaging him in a fistfight, but Jack prevails, killing Miller before jumping overboard as the boat crashes onto the rocks and explodes. Weeks later, Cathy’s obstetrician calls to inform her of the baby’s gender. As Jack and Sally wait expectantly, Cathy hangs up the telephone and smiles. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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