Poison Ivy (1992)

R | 92 mins | Drama | 8 May 1992

Director:

Katt Shea Ruben

Producer:

Andy Ruben

Cinematographer:

Phedon Papamichael

Editor:

Gina Mittleman

Production Designer:

Virginia Lee

Production Companies:

New Line Cinema , MG Entertainment
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HISTORY

Referring to the film as Our House, the 24 Dec 1990 Var production chart noted a Jan 1991 start date in Seattle, WA. The 5 Apr 1991 Screen International reported a delay in principal photography until May 1991, and the 19 Apr 1991 Screen International reported a title change to Fast Lane.
       According to the 4 Mar 1991 DV, New Line Cinema planned to promote the picture at the American Film Market, and noted that production on the less than $5 million film would begin in Jun 1991. On 15 May 1991, DV printed a clarification regarding the film’s start date, reporting that co-producer Rick Nathanson claimed the film, now retitled Poison Ivy, had begun principal photography on 10 Feb 1991 and completed filming in Mar 1991. However, New Line promoted Poison Ivy at the May 1991 Cannes Film Festival and announced that principal photography would begin that month. Filming finally started on 13 May 1991 in Los Angeles, CA, as reported in the 28 May 1991 HR production chart.
       According to an article in the 3 May 1992 NYT, the “production was bumpy.” There were three drafts of the screenplay with four different endings, and the budget was listed as $3 million. However, the 9 May 1991 DV stated a $6-$7 million budget. The 23 Jul 1991 HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       According to the 3 May 1992 NYT, Poison Ivy was shown at the Sundance Film Festival in ... More Less

Referring to the film as Our House, the 24 Dec 1990 Var production chart noted a Jan 1991 start date in Seattle, WA. The 5 Apr 1991 Screen International reported a delay in principal photography until May 1991, and the 19 Apr 1991 Screen International reported a title change to Fast Lane.
       According to the 4 Mar 1991 DV, New Line Cinema planned to promote the picture at the American Film Market, and noted that production on the less than $5 million film would begin in Jun 1991. On 15 May 1991, DV printed a clarification regarding the film’s start date, reporting that co-producer Rick Nathanson claimed the film, now retitled Poison Ivy, had begun principal photography on 10 Feb 1991 and completed filming in Mar 1991. However, New Line promoted Poison Ivy at the May 1991 Cannes Film Festival and announced that principal photography would begin that month. Filming finally started on 13 May 1991 in Los Angeles, CA, as reported in the 28 May 1991 HR production chart.
       According to an article in the 3 May 1992 NYT, the “production was bumpy.” There were three drafts of the screenplay with four different endings, and the budget was listed as $3 million. However, the 9 May 1991 DV stated a $6-$7 million budget. The 23 Jul 1991 HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       According to the 3 May 1992 NYT, Poison Ivy was shown at the Sundance Film Festival in Jan 1992, where it was deemed “one of the most controversial films” with polarized audience reactions. The New York City premiere was held at the Museum of Modern Art on 30 Apr 1992. The 18 May 1992 Var box-office report noted the film had a “promising debut” on twenty screens, with $162,700 in sales receipts. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1991
p. 1, 10.
Daily Variety
9 May 1991
p. 1, 14.
Daily Variety
15 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 May 1992
p. 15.
New York Times
3 May 1992
p. 13, 16.
New York Times
8 May 1992
p. 16.
Screen International
5 Apr 1991.
---
Screen International
19 Apr 1991.
---
Variety
24 Dec 1990.
---
Variety
2 Feb 1992
p. 81.
Variety
18 May 1992
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Line Cinema presents
A New Line production
In association with Andy Ruben
and MG Entertainment, Inc.
A Katt Shea Ruben film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr, 2d unit
Unit prod mgr, Addl photog
1st asst dir, Addl photog
2d asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Co-exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based upon a story by
Based upon a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog dir
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Still photog
Video eng
Best boy elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Rigging grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Addl photog
1st asst cam, Addl photog
2d asst cam, Addl photog
Video asst, Addl photog
B-cam op, Addl photog
B-cam asst, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Best boy grip, Addl photog
Dolly grip, Addl photog
Grip, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Best boy elec, Addl photog
Elec, Addl photog
Elec, Addl photog
24-frame video by, Addl photog
Video transfer, Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst to art dir
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
Art dir, Addl photog
Art dir, Addl photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Exec in charge of post-prod
Post-prod supv
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Post-prod facilities, Addl photog
Negative cutting, Addl photog
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
On-set dresser
On-set dresser
Lead person
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Swing
Props, Addl photog
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Asst cost des
Cost const
Ward, Addl photog
Ward, Addl photog
Wig maker, Addl photog
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Piano coach
Mus orch and cond by
Mus rec at
Vancouver, British Columbia
Mus rec and mixed by
Mus rec and mixed by
Addl mus prod and arr by
Addl mus prod and arr by
Mus eng by
Mus clearances by
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, Addl photog
Boom, Addl photog
Sd transfers, Addl photog
Supv sd ed, Addl photog
Digital sd des, Addl photog
Dial ed, Addl photog
ADR ed, Addl photog
Foley mixer, Addl photog
Foley mixer, Addl photog
Foley artist, Addl photog
Foley artist, Addl photog
Re-rec mixer, Addl photog
Re-rec mixer, Addl photog
Dir of sd services, Addl photog
Digital sd & re-rec by, Addl photog
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
ADR casting by
Prod sd by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec FX coord
Spec FX tech
Spec FX tech
Spec FX tech
Spec eff coord, Addl photog
Spec eff tech, Addl photog
Titles & Opticals, Addl photog
Opt supv, Addl photog
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key makeup artist
Asst makeup
Key hairstylist
Makeup/Hair (swing)
Makeup, 2d unit
Key makeup, Addl photog
Key hair, Addl photog
Wig maker, Addl photog
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to the dir and prod
2d unit coord
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Prod controller
Prod attorney
Contract supv
Post-prod admin
Legal asst
Scr supv
Casting asst
Loc mgr
Loc scout
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver/Medic
Driver/Mechanic
Prod van driver
Prod asst
Key set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Prod intern
Prod intern
Coord, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Driver, 2d unit
Driver, 2d unit
Driver, 2d unit
Prod coord, Addl photog
Prod secy, Addl photog
Scr supv, Addl photog
Loc mgr, Addl photog
Craft service, Addl photog
Catering, Addl photog
Transportation coord, Addl photog
Transportation co-cood, Addl photog
Driver, Addl photog
Driver, Addl photog
Driver, Addl photog
Driver, Addl photog
Prod van driver, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Extras casting by, Addl photog
Researcher, Addl photog
Medical adv, Addl photog
Welfare worker, Addl photog
Studio teacher, Addl photog
Police contact, Addl photog
Security provided by, Addl photog
Security coord, Addl photog
Operation mgr, Addl photog
Animals supplied by, Addl photog
Animal trainer, Addl photog
Animal trainer, Addl photog
American Humane Association, Addl photog
Caterer, Addl photog
Craft service, Addl photog
Shoes provided by, Addl photog
Insurance, Addl photog
Payroll services, Addl photog
Prod equip provided by
Water trucks provided by
Picture Tractor Trailers provided by
Limousines provided by
Exec in charge of prod
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord, Addl photog
Asst stunt coord, Addl photog
Stunt, Addl photog
Stunt, Addl photog
Stunt, Addl photog
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film processing, Addl photog
Col timer, Addl photog
SOURCES
SONGS
"Baby 89," written by Scott Drake and Jeff Fieldhouse, performed by The Humpers, courtesy of Mean Dog Records
"Very First Lie," written by Jim Ellison, performed by Material Issue, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
"Let It Go," written and performed by Dan Reed, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
+
SONGS
"Baby 89," written by Scott Drake and Jeff Fieldhouse, performed by The Humpers, courtesy of Mean Dog Records
"Very First Lie," written by Jim Ellison, performed by Material Issue, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
"Let It Go," written and performed by Dan Reed, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
"The Salt Of Joy," written and performed by Dan Reed, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
"Too Bad," written by W. Crane and E. Phillips, performed by Ugly Kid Joe, courtesy of Stardog/Mercury Records
"Out Of The Blue," written by Aaron Davis, performed by Aaron Davis Band
"Mama Never Told Me," written and performed by Dan Shea.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Our House
Fast Lane
Release Date:
8 May 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 8 May 1992
New York opening: week of 8 May 1992
Production Date:
13 May--late July 1991
Copyright Claimant:
New Line Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 September 1992
Copyright Number:
PA581585
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Filmed with Eastman Kodak
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras and lenses
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Sylvie Cooper, a misfit high school student, watches a free-spirited, sexy teenager on a rope swing in the park, and sketches her portrait. Later, the girls meet outside the high school principal’s office. Sylvie admires the girl’s temporary tattoo of a cross covered with ivy, and learns she is there on a scholarship. However, her low grades in biology are a problem. Sylvie admits to calling in a bomb scare to a television station after disagreeing with an editorial by her father, Darryl, the general manager. Darryl arrives at the school, furious, and Sylvie apologizes. When the other girl asks for a lift home, Darryl refuses. However, Sylvie convinces him to give a ride to her new best friend, “Ivy.” Sylvie asks Ivy for her real name, but she insists on using her new alias. Later, at the park, Ivy admires Sylvie’s jewel necklace, and she explains it was a gift from Darryl, who adopted her after marrying her mother. Ivy declares she is lucky to receive such gifts, and claims her own father is abusive. Sylvie shares that she tried to commit suicide by slitting her wrist and shows Ivy the scar. They walk home together and Ivy is impressed by Sylvie’s expansive home. Inside, they are greeted by Sylvie’s dog, Fred, who does not like anyone but her, and Sylvie asks Ivy to be quiet because her mother, Georgie, is ill. However, Georgie comes downstairs, and shows disdain for Ivy. As Sylvie helps her mother back to bed, Georgie states she does not want her daughter hanging out with such a low ... +


Sylvie Cooper, a misfit high school student, watches a free-spirited, sexy teenager on a rope swing in the park, and sketches her portrait. Later, the girls meet outside the high school principal’s office. Sylvie admires the girl’s temporary tattoo of a cross covered with ivy, and learns she is there on a scholarship. However, her low grades in biology are a problem. Sylvie admits to calling in a bomb scare to a television station after disagreeing with an editorial by her father, Darryl, the general manager. Darryl arrives at the school, furious, and Sylvie apologizes. When the other girl asks for a lift home, Darryl refuses. However, Sylvie convinces him to give a ride to her new best friend, “Ivy.” Sylvie asks Ivy for her real name, but she insists on using her new alias. Later, at the park, Ivy admires Sylvie’s jewel necklace, and she explains it was a gift from Darryl, who adopted her after marrying her mother. Ivy declares she is lucky to receive such gifts, and claims her own father is abusive. Sylvie shares that she tried to commit suicide by slitting her wrist and shows Ivy the scar. They walk home together and Ivy is impressed by Sylvie’s expansive home. Inside, they are greeted by Sylvie’s dog, Fred, who does not like anyone but her, and Sylvie asks Ivy to be quiet because her mother, Georgie, is ill. However, Georgie comes downstairs, and shows disdain for Ivy. As Sylvie helps her mother back to bed, Georgie states she does not want her daughter hanging out with such a low class person. Sylvie attempts to adjust her mother’s oxygen mask, which is not working, and Ivy arrives and fixes the inhaler. The girl reveals that her mother died of a cocaine overdose, and she now lives with an aunt who is paid to be her caretaker. Ivy wins over Georgie, ingratiates herself to the family, and soon becomes a fixture in their home. Georgie lends Ivy clothing, and Sylvie takes her shopping. Later, as the girls sleep side-by-side, Sylvie admits that Darryl is her real father, and that she never tried to kill herself, but was hurt in an accident. At breakfast, Darryl is upset with Georgie’s dependence on medication and they argue. Sylvie tries to intervene, however, Georgie ignores her daughter and asks Ivy to help her back to her bedroom. When Ivy joins Sylvie at the bus stop, she suggests they skip school. The girls go to a tattoo parlor where Ivy gets a permanent rendition of the cross encircled with ivy, and convinces Sylvie to also get a tattoo. The girls return home and discover Georgie standing on her balcony ledge. Believing she might be attempting suicide, they pull her back inside. Sylvie tries to talk with her mother, but Georgie is too tired. That night, Darryl removes his toupee, gets a midnight snack, and encounters Ivy. She flirts with him, claiming she finds him attractive without the hair piece. Later, Darryl is concerned about keeping his job, and plans to have a party to impress his colleagues. Sylvie promises to help her father, but Ivy answers Sylvie’s phone and commits her to chaperoning a “Head Start” outing on the day of the party. She “forgets” to mention it to Sylvie, who is surprised when the van arrives just before the party. Ivy insists she feels like a fool for the “mix-up,” and offers to help with the party. She borrows one of Georgie’s sexy gowns and serves champagne to the guests. Although Darryl is a recovering alcoholic, he claims it is okay to drink champagne because he has resolved his addiction. After the party, Ivy dances seductively and Darryl joins her. Georgie interrupts them and rushes back upstairs, upset. When Darryl follows her, Georgie demands several pills, which he gives to her. Ivy brings champagne, claiming the dress reminded Darryl of his ill wife. She insists that she found him crying and embraced him as a friendly gesture. Georgie accepts the explanation, and after she falls asleep, Ivy moves seductively toward Darryl and they fondle each other next to Georgie’s unconscious body. Later, Sylvie returns home, and is jealous to find her dog, Fred, sleeping next to Ivy. The next morning, Darryl drinks vodka, but hides the glass from his daughter. Sylvie is outraged to find Ivy and Fred in her mother’s convertible, unaware that Ivy lures the animal with treats. Sylvie pretends to leave for school, but retreats to the park instead. After school, Darryl picks up Ivy, and they make love. Sometime later, Ivy apologizes to Sylvie about the dog, and the girls reconcile. As Georgie listens to a recording of music that Sylvie wrote for her, she wanders to the balcony. Ivy joins her and pushes Georgie over the ledge to her death. Darryl and Sylvie believe Georgie committed suicide. Days later, Darryl is fired from his job. Ivy gets Georgie’s urn and convinces Sylvie to go for a drive in the convertible to honor her mother. Ivy races recklessly down the winding mountain road, humming a tune, and Sylvie realizes it is the song she wrote for Georgie. Now aware that Ivy was present at her mother’s death, Sylvie demands to know what Georgie said before killing herself, and Ivy becomes irate. She asks if Sylvie is accusing her of killing Georgie, and crashes the car into a tree. Although Ivy hits the steering wheel, she remains conscious, but Sylvie smashes into the windshield and is rendered unconscious. Ivy moves Sylvie to the driver’s seat and smears her blood on the steering wheel. Sylvie awakens in the hospital and tries to convince her father that Ivy is responsible for the accident and Georgie’s death, but he assumes she is incoherent due to head trauma. Later, Sylvie sneaks out of the hospital and returns home, and sees Darryl making love to Ivy. As her father chases Sylvie outside, he trips on the stairs. Ivy promises to find Sylvie, but Darryl sees her bruises from the steering wheel and realizes that she lied about the automobile accident. As he drives off to find his daughter, Ivy goes to Georgie’s room. Sylvie watches from outside as Ivy stands on the balcony ledge. She goes to her mother’s room to confront Ivy. Due to her head injury, Sylvie hallucinates a vision of her mother. She declares her love, and “Georgie” kisses her. However, Sylvie quickly realizes Ivy is kissing her, and pushes the girl away. As Ivy falls off the ledge, she grabs Sylvie’s necklace. She threatens to take Sylvie with her, but the necklace snaps and Ivy falls to her death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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