Wayne's World (1992)

PG-13 | 95 mins | Comedy | 14 February 1992

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HISTORY

       According to a 3 Nov 1991 LAT article, the project was conceived in 1990 after Lorne Michaels, the creator and producer of Saturday Night Live (NBC, 11 Oct 1975--present), received a “multi-picture development deal” with Paramount Pictures. The screenplay was a first-time feature film effort for writer and Saturday Night Live performer Mike Myers, who created the character of “Wayne Campbell” when he was in high school. Working with Bonnie Turner and Terry Turner, Myers went through twenty-five drafts before finalizing the script. The project was the second feature film to be based on a Saturday Night Live sketch, after The Blues Brothers (1980, see entry).
       Wayne’s World was greenlit by Paramount in Jun 1991, with a forty-day filming schedule that began 2 Aug 1991 in Los Angeles, CA, as noted in 17 Sep 1991 HR production charts. Principal photography was described as “hectic,” partly due to the lead actors’ need to return to their roles on Saturday Night Live by the end of Sep 1991. The film was director Penelope Spheeris’s first major studio project. She admitted to being nervous during production in the 3 Nov 1991 LAT, but stated that she was happy with the finished product. While a 12 Feb 1992 HR article listed the budget as $14 million, a 19 Mar 1992 Rolling Stone article stated that it cost $13 million.
       According to LAT, Los Angeles locations included the Universal Amphitheatre, which doubled for the Milwaukee, WI, concert space in which Alice Cooper performs. An 8 Aug 1995 ... More Less

       According to a 3 Nov 1991 LAT article, the project was conceived in 1990 after Lorne Michaels, the creator and producer of Saturday Night Live (NBC, 11 Oct 1975--present), received a “multi-picture development deal” with Paramount Pictures. The screenplay was a first-time feature film effort for writer and Saturday Night Live performer Mike Myers, who created the character of “Wayne Campbell” when he was in high school. Working with Bonnie Turner and Terry Turner, Myers went through twenty-five drafts before finalizing the script. The project was the second feature film to be based on a Saturday Night Live sketch, after The Blues Brothers (1980, see entry).
       Wayne’s World was greenlit by Paramount in Jun 1991, with a forty-day filming schedule that began 2 Aug 1991 in Los Angeles, CA, as noted in 17 Sep 1991 HR production charts. Principal photography was described as “hectic,” partly due to the lead actors’ need to return to their roles on Saturday Night Live by the end of Sep 1991. The film was director Penelope Spheeris’s first major studio project. She admitted to being nervous during production in the 3 Nov 1991 LAT, but stated that she was happy with the finished product. While a 12 Feb 1992 HR article listed the budget as $14 million, a 19 Mar 1992 Rolling Stone article stated that it cost $13 million.
       According to LAT, Los Angeles locations included the Universal Amphitheatre, which doubled for the Milwaukee, WI, concert space in which Alice Cooper performs. An 8 Aug 1995 LAT brief noted that the streets of Covina, CA, stood in for Wayne and Garth’s hometown of Aurora, IL.
       Although the film was reviewed poorly, it fared well at the box-office, setting a record for the biggest President’s Day weekend opening to date with a gross of roughly $18 million, according to an 18 Feb 1992 WSJ news brief; the previous record was held by Silence of the Lambs (1991, see entry), which took in $13.7 million over President’s Day weekend the previous year. A 12 Jul 1992 Houston Chronicle article reported that the film eventually earned over $120 million in theaters.


      End credits include the following acknowledgements: “‘Wayne’s World’ used with permission from NBC, Inc”; “Special Thanks to: The Shotmaker Company; Selected Monitors Provided by Ikegami Electronics (U.S.A.), Inc.; Professional Broadcast Intercom Equipment provided by RTS Systems, a Telex Communications Company; Cities of Aurora & Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles Film Commission”; and “The Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this motion picture were licensed by Major League Properties, Inc.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 1992
p. 8, 50.
Houston Chronicle
12 Jul 1992
p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
3 Nov 1991
Calendar, pp. 3-4, 31-34.
Los Angeles Times
14 Feb 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
8 Aug 1995.
---
New York Times
14 Feb 1992
p. 15.
Rolling Stone
19 Mar 1992
pp. 37-40.
Variety
17 Feb 1992
p. 69.
WSJ
18 Feb 1992.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Lorne Michaels Production
A Penelope Spheeris Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
B cam op
1st asst photog
B cam 1st asst photog
2d asst photog
B cam 2d asst photog
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Technocrane op
Technocrane asst
Video supv
Video assist
Video tech supv
24 frame video displays by
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video crew
Video crew
Video crew
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Dimmer op
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Grip
Still photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam systems by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept researcher
Art dept prod asst
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Paint foreperson
Paint foreperson
Prod painter
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Mus coord
Supv mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supv ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec make-up eff
Spec make-up eff
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Titles and opt eff
Title des
DANCE
"Foxy Lady" choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Body make-up
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Voice casting
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
AFI trainee
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Asst to Mr. Michaels
Asst to Mr. Koch, Jr.
Asst to Ms. Spheeris
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Post prod accountant
Accounting asst
Unit pub
Casting assoc
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
First aid
Dial instructor
Dial instructor
Caterer
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc mgr, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Mike Myers.
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Romeo and Juliet - Fantasy Overture," by P. Tchaikovsky, performed by Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, courtesy of Laserlight, by arrangement with Sounds of Film Ltd.
"String Quartet in G, Opus 54, No. 1 - Third Movement," by F. Haydn, performed by The Aeolian Quartet, courtesy of Decca Records, a division of Polygram Classics
"Theme from 'Star Trek'," by Alexander Courage
+
MUSIC
"Romeo and Juliet - Fantasy Overture," by P. Tchaikovsky, performed by Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, courtesy of Laserlight, by arrangement with Sounds of Film Ltd.
"String Quartet in G, Opus 54, No. 1 - Third Movement," by F. Haydn, performed by The Aeolian Quartet, courtesy of Decca Records, a division of Polygram Classics
"Theme from 'Star Trek'," by Alexander Courage
"The Murder," by Bernard Herrmann
"'Mission: Impossible Theme," by Lalo Schifrin.
+
SONGS
"'Wayne's World' Theme," by Mike Myers & G. E. Smith
"Bohemian Rhapsody," by Freddie Mercury, performed by Queen, courtesy of Hollywood Records/EMI Records
"Everything About You," by Whitfield Crane & Klaus Eichstadt, performed by Ugly Kid Joe, courtesy of Stardog Records/Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
+
SONGS
"'Wayne's World' Theme," by Mike Myers & G. E. Smith
"Bohemian Rhapsody," by Freddie Mercury, performed by Queen, courtesy of Hollywood Records/EMI Records
"Everything About You," by Whitfield Crane & Klaus Eichstadt, performed by Ugly Kid Joe, courtesy of Stardog Records/Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Products
"Sound Off," by Willie Lee Duckworth
"Dream Weaver," written and performed by Gary Wright, produced by David Gamson & Gary Wright
"Fire," by Jimi Hendrix, performed by Tia Carrere, produced by Ted Templeman
"Loud Love," written by Chris Cornell, performed by Soundgarden, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Rock Candy," by Ronnie Montrose, Sammy Hagar, Bill Church & Denny Carmassi, performed by BulletBoys, produced by Ted Templeman, BulletBoys performs courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Loving Your Lovin," by Jerry Williams, performed by Eric Clapton, courtesy of Reprise Records
"Blue Hawaii," by Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger
"Touch Me," by Jennifer Blakeman, Kelly Breznik & Danny Johnson, performed by Tia Carrere, produced by Ted Templeman
"Hot and Bothered," by Eric Brittingham & Tom Keifer, performed by Cinderella, produced by Gary Lyons & Tom Keifer, courtesy of Mercury/Polygram Inc.
"Sikamikanico," by Anthony Keidis, Flea, John Frusciante & Chad Smith, performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Mickey," by Nicky Chinn and Michael Chapman
"Foxy Lady," written & performed by Jimi Hendrix, courtesy of Are You Experienced? Ltd.
"Cold Chills," by Donnie Purnell & Bob Halligan, Jr., performed by Kix, courtesy of Eastwest Records America, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"All Night Thing," by Chris Cornell, performed by Temple of the Dog, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Happy to Birthday to You," by Mildred J. Hill & Patty S. Hill
"Ride with Yourself," by Greg Fields & Georg Dolivo, performed by Rhino Bucket, courtesy of Reprise Records
"Why You Wanna Break My Heart," by Dwight Twilley, performed by Tia Carrere, produced by Ted Templeman
"Feed My Frankenstein," by Zodiac Mindwarp, Alice Cooper, Nick Coler & Ian Richardson, performed by Alice Cooper, courtesy of Epic Records
"Making Our Dreams Come True," by Norman Gimbel & Charles Fox
"Time Machine," by Geezer Butler, Ronnie James Dio & Tony Iommi, performed by Black Sabbath, Black Sabbath performs courtesy of Warner Bros. Records/I.R.S. Records
"'Wayne's World' Theme (Extended Version)," by Mike Myers & G. E. Smith, performed by Wayne & Garth (Mike Myers & Dana Carvey), produced by G. E. Smith
"Ballroom Blitz," by Michael Chapman & Nicky Chinn, performed by Tia Carrere, produced by Ted Templeman.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 February 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 14 February 1992
New York opening: week of 14 February 1992
Production Date:
2 August--late September 1991 in Southern California
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
18 February 1992
Copyright Number:
PA560628
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31308
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Watching television in bed, TV producer Benjamin Oliver happens upon a public-access program called “Wayne’s World,” hosted by Wayne Campbell, a twenty-something who lives with his parents, and his dimwitted friend, Garth Algar. Intrigued by the show, Oliver calls a colleague, Russell Finley, and tells him to watch. Later, a camera follows Wayne around as he explains that he lives in Aurora, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Wayne expresses his wish to produce “Wayne’s World” for a living, then hops into Garth’s awaiting car. With their friends Terry and Neil in the backseat, Garth and Wayne play a cassette tape of the song “Bohemian Rhapsody,” singing along as they drive into town. At a drive-in, they pick up their inebriated friend, Phil, and continue to Stan Mikita’s Donuts, where they order crullers and coffee. Garth ogles one of the female employees, Dreamwoman, while Stacy, Wayne’s obsessive ex-girlfriend, tries to give Wayne a gift that he rejects. Later, Wayne spots Cassandra, a Chinese-American singer, as she and her band perform at a nightclub. After the show, a smitten Wayne introduces himself, and Cassandra invites him to an upcoming party at her loft. At the office, Oliver and Russell show “Wayne’s World” to Noah Vanderhoff, who owns a chain of arcades, hoping Noah will provide advertising sponsorship for “Wayne’s World” if they produce it. Although Noah initially rejects the idea, Oliver promises Noah a regular appearance on the show so that he can inform viewers about his latest arcade games. Oliver and Russell then show up at Wayne’s house after a taping of “Wayne’s World,” inviting Wayne and Garth out to dinner. At a restaurant, Oliver informs the duo that Noah ... +


Watching television in bed, TV producer Benjamin Oliver happens upon a public-access program called “Wayne’s World,” hosted by Wayne Campbell, a twenty-something who lives with his parents, and his dimwitted friend, Garth Algar. Intrigued by the show, Oliver calls a colleague, Russell Finley, and tells him to watch. Later, a camera follows Wayne around as he explains that he lives in Aurora, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Wayne expresses his wish to produce “Wayne’s World” for a living, then hops into Garth’s awaiting car. With their friends Terry and Neil in the backseat, Garth and Wayne play a cassette tape of the song “Bohemian Rhapsody,” singing along as they drive into town. At a drive-in, they pick up their inebriated friend, Phil, and continue to Stan Mikita’s Donuts, where they order crullers and coffee. Garth ogles one of the female employees, Dreamwoman, while Stacy, Wayne’s obsessive ex-girlfriend, tries to give Wayne a gift that he rejects. Later, Wayne spots Cassandra, a Chinese-American singer, as she and her band perform at a nightclub. After the show, a smitten Wayne introduces himself, and Cassandra invites him to an upcoming party at her loft. At the office, Oliver and Russell show “Wayne’s World” to Noah Vanderhoff, who owns a chain of arcades, hoping Noah will provide advertising sponsorship for “Wayne’s World” if they produce it. Although Noah initially rejects the idea, Oliver promises Noah a regular appearance on the show so that he can inform viewers about his latest arcade games. Oliver and Russell then show up at Wayne’s house after a taping of “Wayne’s World,” inviting Wayne and Garth out to dinner. At a restaurant, Oliver informs the duo that Noah wants to sponsor their show on Oliver’s television station. Oliver presents contracts and two checks for $5,000, and Wayne and Garth panic. Wayne skims the contract and signs it, although Garth worries that they are moving too fast. Afterward, the four go to Cassandra’s loft party, where Wayne stares at Cassandra as she performs. Oliver gives Cassandra his business card, suggesting that she could play on a late-night show he is producing, and afterward, Wayne takes her up to the roof and, in Cantonese, tells her she looks pretty. Impressed, Cassandra responds in Cantonese, and although he is just learning, Wayne is strangely fluent. Rehearsing for the first time at the television station, Wayne and Garth have a hard time adjusting to the professional setting. Later, Oliver asks Garth about giving Noah a spot on the show, and Garth says he fears change. On a date with Cassandra, Wayne shows her a Fender Stratocaster© electric guitar he wants to buy. Elsewhere in the music store, Garth sits down at a drum set and fantasizes about playing onstage, impressing a store clerk with his skills. Back at the television studio, Russell tells Oliver that Wayne is not going to want Noah appearing on “Wayne’s World,” but Oliver argues that it is stipulated in Wayne and Garth’s contract. When Oliver approaches Wayne about Noah coming onto the show, Wayne rejects the idea as commercialism. The next morning, lying in bed with Wayne, Cassandra gets a call from her drummer that he might not be able to film the music video Oliver has arranged for them, but she insists he be there. Angling to spend more time alone with Cassandra, Oliver gives Garth and Wayne backstage passes to an Alice Cooper concert in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At the concert, they spy a limousine owned by Frankie “Mr. Big” Sharp, a powerful record executive. Wayne and Garth personally congratulate Alice Cooper after the show, although Garth can hardly speak in the singer’s presence. During the first taping of “Wayne’s World” at the television station, Wayne and Garth are taken aback by the pre-recorded theme song that Russell plays in place of Wayne and Garth’s usual singing. During the first segment, Wayne begrudgingly introduces Noah to talk about his arcades; however, Wayne uses note cards with insults written on the back of them, encouraging viewers to laugh at his guest. At commercial break, Oliver calls Wayne into the control room and reprimands him for humiliating Noah. Wayne storms out, leaving Garth to host the show alone. Panicked, Garth goes silent on camera. Later that night, Garth is angry that Wayne abandoned him on set, and warns Wayne that Oliver is trying to seduce Cassandra. The next day, Wayne finds Garth at the donut shop and the two reconcile, and Garth encourages Wayne to go after Cassandra. The two devise a scheme to broadcast a performance by Cassandra’s band from their basement so that it will be picked up by the antenna on Mr. Big’s limousine, hopefully piquing the record producer’s interest. Wayne interrupts Cassandra’s music video shoot, which is not going well, to tell her that he has set up an audition for her with Mr. Big, but she must return with Wayne to his basement so he can broadcast her performance. Annoyed by Oliver, Cassandra leaves with Wayne. That night, Russell catches Garth and his friends stealing equipment from the television station, and after Garth convinces Russell that Oliver is a bad guy, he joins them. Wayne’s broadcast of Cassandra’s band successfully reaches Mr. Big’s limousine, and after Wayne announces his street address, Mr. Big orders his limousine driver to take him there. Oliver and Mr. Big arrive separately at Wayne’s basement at the same time. Mr. Big tells Cassandra that she is beautiful, but he cannot offer her a record deal. Stacy shows up to tell Wayne that she is pregnant, the television equipment catches fire, and Cassandra leaves with Oliver. Wayne and Garth then address a camera and say that their story does not end that way. Returning to Cassandra’s performance in the basement, Wayne speaks to the camera as Mr. Big introduces himself and the police lead Oliver inside in handcuffs. Wayne rips a mask off Oliver’s face, revealing that Oliver is really an old local named Mr. Withers. Wayne and Garth declare that this is their “Scooby Doo” ending, then suggest that they go to their “mega-happy ending.” Returning to the moment that Mr. Big appears in Wayne’s basement once again, Mr. Big offers Cassandra a six-record deal just before Cassandra declares her love for Wayne. Garth’s Dreamwoman from the donut shop appears, declaring her love for him, and Oliver admits that his money and good looks can’t get him everything in life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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