The Beverly Hillbillies (1993)

PG | 94 mins | Comedy | 15 October 1993

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HISTORY

       A 23 Sep 1964 HR item indicated that interest in a motion picture adaptation of The Beverly Hillbillies (CBS, 26 Sep 1962—23 Mar 1971) began while the popular television series was still on the air. Although Filmways&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>Filmways planned to distribute through CBS theatrical affiliate Paramount Pictures, news items in the 2 Oct 1987 and 20 Jun 1990 DV later linked the project to Warner Bros. Pictures after producer David Permut obtained rights to the property. Television series creator Paul Henning, producer Dale Launer, and screenwriters Peter Farrelly, Bennett Yellin, and Bob Farrelly were also attached. Only Permut remained involved with the production, although he did not receive a credit in the final film.
       The1 Oct 1992 HR announced that Penelope Spheeris would direct for Twentieth Century Fox, following her $121-million hit, Wayne’s World (1992, see entry), and the recent success of other television adaptations such as Dragnet (1987, see entry) and The Addams Family (1991, see entry). At the time, production was expected to begin in Jan 1993 for a 4 Jul 1993 release.
       The 2 Mar 1993 HR stated that principal photography began 22 Feb 1993. According to the 4 May 1993 Long Beach Press-Telegram, highway markers along Shoreline Drive in Long Beach, CA, were changed to resemble Los Angeles, CA, signs during filming. Although that specific area was free from the strict jurisdiction of the California Department of Transportation, modifications were reportedly made without Long Beach city permission. A 17 Oct 1993 LAT article also named the Beverly Hills Civic Center, Rodeo Drive, and Beverly Hills ... More Less

       A 23 Sep 1964 HR item indicated that interest in a motion picture adaptation of The Beverly Hillbillies (CBS, 26 Sep 1962—23 Mar 1971) began while the popular television series was still on the air. Although Filmways&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>Filmways planned to distribute through CBS theatrical affiliate Paramount Pictures, news items in the 2 Oct 1987 and 20 Jun 1990 DV later linked the project to Warner Bros. Pictures after producer David Permut obtained rights to the property. Television series creator Paul Henning, producer Dale Launer, and screenwriters Peter Farrelly, Bennett Yellin, and Bob Farrelly were also attached. Only Permut remained involved with the production, although he did not receive a credit in the final film.
       The1 Oct 1992 HR announced that Penelope Spheeris would direct for Twentieth Century Fox, following her $121-million hit, Wayne’s World (1992, see entry), and the recent success of other television adaptations such as Dragnet (1987, see entry) and The Addams Family (1991, see entry). At the time, production was expected to begin in Jan 1993 for a 4 Jul 1993 release.
       The 2 Mar 1993 HR stated that principal photography began 22 Feb 1993. According to the 4 May 1993 Long Beach Press-Telegram, highway markers along Shoreline Drive in Long Beach, CA, were changed to resemble Los Angeles, CA, signs during filming. Although that specific area was free from the strict jurisdiction of the California Department of Transportation, modifications were reportedly made without Long Beach city permission. A 17 Oct 1993 LAT article also named the Beverly Hills Civic Center, Rodeo Drive, and Beverly Hills High School as locations, while the 2 Dec 1993 LAT stated the “Clampett” mansion in “Beverly Hills” was actually located on South Oakland Avenue in Pasadena, CA. The property had previously burned down and a developer was in the process of reconstruction when Fox offered to complete exterior renovations in exchange for its use. Neighbors allowed the production to film a cattle drive on the same street, but the scene was cut from the final film. A 13 Jun 1993 LAT item estimated a final production cost of $25 million.
       Playing to the audience’s familiarity with the television series, Spheeris hired country singer Jerry Scoggins to re-record his original theme song, “The Ballad Of Jed Clampett.” According to the 31 Oct 1993 LAT, the updated version changed a key lyric, elevating the eponymous character from “millionaire” to “billionaire.” Jesse Dupree, lead singer of the band Jackyl, was also signed to perform a song for the film’s soundtrack, but the 12 Aug 1993 HR reported that Spheeris revoked Dupree’s participation after learning of his nude photo spread in the Aug 1993 issue of Playgirl magazine.
       A 16 Aug 1993 HR article announced that positive feedback from test screenings in Fort Worth, TX, prompted Fox to move the Thanksgiving weekend opening up to 24 Sep 1993, thereby avoiding competition with that year’s other holiday releases, Sister Act 2, The Three Musketeers, and Addams Family Values (see entries). As a result of the compressed schedule, Subway Sandwiches and Shasta soft drinks were forced to drop their promised media funding and instead promoted the film through point-of-purchase materials and sweepstakes contests beginning 20 Sep 1993. Despite the earlier reported release date change, however, The Beverly Hillbillies actually opened three weeks later, on 15 Oct 1993. The premiere took place 11 Oct 1993 at Mann’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, CA, as reported in the 13 Oct 1993 DV.
       Although reviews were generally negative, LAT critic Peter Rainer and NYT critic Janet Maslin praised the film’s strong cast for invoking the humor of the television show.
      End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The character Barnaby Jones provided by Evergreen Programs, Inc., a unit of Spelling Entertainment Group”; “Clip from People’s Court provided by Ralph Edwards Productions”; and, “The Producers wish to thank: The City of Beverly Hills, The City of Long Beach, The City of Pasadena, O. W. Lee Outdoor Furniture, Imperial Wallcoverings, Precor.” A statement notes that animal action was monitored by the American Humane Association, and, “The orangutan used in this film is a captive-born animal. He belongs to a highly endangered species protected by international laws and treaties.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Oct 1987.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1990
p. 1, 25.
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 1964.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1992
p. 3, 21.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1993
p. 17, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 1993
p. 1, 23.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1993
p. 5, 14.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
4 May 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 3, 30.
Los Angeles Times
15 Oct 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
17 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Oct 1993
Calendar.
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1993.
---
New York Times
15 Oct 1993
Section C, p. 20.
Variety
18 Oct 1993
p. 51.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
as Jethro and Jethrine
as Barnaby Jones
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Penelope Spheeris Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
Cam loader
Video eng
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
Rigging gaffer
Key rigging grip
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Grip best boy
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Addl photog
Addl cam asst
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Still photog
Video asst equip by
Arriflex cams provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Illustrator
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Lightworks asst
2d asst ed
Intern
Negative cutter
Post prod services provided by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Prop master
Asst prop master
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Const coord
Gen cost foreman
Propmaker foreman
Painter foreman
Greens foreman
Labor foreman
Set dressing asst
Const estimator
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
MUSIC
Score by
Acoustic steel guitar
Mus coord
Scoring eng
Orch mgr
Mus supv
for Music Advisory Group
Soundtrack exec
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR asst ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
ADR rec
ADR group
Foley artist
Foley artist
Post prod sd services provided by
a division of Lucas Digital Ltd., Marin County
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff gang boss
Titles and opticals by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Hair supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Asst to Ms. Spheeris
Asst prod coord
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Dialect coach
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting, Central Casting
Loc security
Jethro's trucks fabricated by
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Animals supplied by
Head animal trainer
Animal trainer
First aid
Caterer, For Stars Catering
Craft service
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based upon the television series The Beverly Hillbillies created by Paul Henning (CBS Television Network and Filmways Television, 1962).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“White Lightnin’,” performed by Joe Diffie, written by J. P. Richardson, produced by Johnny Slate and Joe Diffie, for Johnny Slate Productions, Joe Diffie appears courtesy of Epic Records
“Ballad Of Jed Clampett,” performed by Jerry Scoggins, written by Paul Henning, produced by Bela Fleck
“If You’ve Got The Money I’ve Got The Time,” performed by Ricky Van Shelton, written by Lefty Frizzell and Jim Beck, produced by Steve Buckingham, Ricky Van Shelton appears courtesy of Columbia Records
+
SONGS
“White Lightnin’,” performed by Joe Diffie, written by J. P. Richardson, produced by Johnny Slate and Joe Diffie, for Johnny Slate Productions, Joe Diffie appears courtesy of Epic Records
“Ballad Of Jed Clampett,” performed by Jerry Scoggins, written by Paul Henning, produced by Bela Fleck
“If You’ve Got The Money I’ve Got The Time,” performed by Ricky Van Shelton, written by Lefty Frizzell and Jim Beck, produced by Steve Buckingham, Ricky Van Shelton appears courtesy of Columbia Records
“Hot Rod Lincoln,” performed by Jim Varney featuring Ricky Skaggs, written by Charlie Ryan and W. S. Stevenson, produced by Garth Pundle, Ricky Skaggs appears courtesy of Epic Records
“I Ain’t Never,” performed by The Oak Ridge Boys, written by Mel Tillis and Webb Pierce, produced by Richard Landis for Outlandis Productions, Doug Supernaw appears courtesy of the BNA Entertainment Label of DMG Music
"Together Again," performed by Doug Supernaw, written by Buck Owens, produced by Richard Landis for Outlandis Productions, Doug Supernaw appears courtesy of the DNA Entertainment Label of BMG Music
“Wasted Days and Wasted Nights,” performed by Texas Tornados, vocal by Freddy Fender, written by Freddy Fender and Wayne Duncan, produced by Bill Halverson for Moligra Productions, Texas Tornados appear courtesy of Reprise Records
“I’m Movin’ On,” performed by Sammy Kershaw, written by Hank Snow, produced by Buddy Cannon and Norro Wilson, Sammy Kershaw appears courtesy of Mercury Nashville
“Honey Don’t,” performed by Joe Walsh and Steve Earle, written by Carl Lee Perkins, produced by Joe Walsh, Steve Earle and Chris Lord-Alge, Joe Walsh appears courtesy of Great Pyramid Records
“Crying Time,” performed by Lorrie Morgan, written by Buck Owens, produced by Richard Landis for Outlandis Productions, Lorrie Morgan appears courtesy of the BNA Entertainment Label of BMG Music
“I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” performed by Aaron Tippin, written by Hank Williams, produced by Scott Hendricks, Aaron Tippin appears courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Music
“If You Ain’t Got Love,” written and performed by Dolly Parton, produced by Dolly Parton with the Mighty Fine Band, Dolly Parton appears courtesy of Columbia Records
“Ballad Of Jet Clampett (Instrumental),” performed by Bela Fleck with Randy Scruggs, written by Paul Henning, produced by Bela Fleck, Bela Fleck appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” written and performed by Hank Williams, produced by Fred Rose, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution
“Jeopardy Theme,” written by Merv Griffin
“Dueling Banjos,” performed by Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell, written by Arthur Smith, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Productions
“Barnaby Jones” Main Title, written by Jerry Goldsmith
“Rocky Mountain Way,” performed by Joe Walsh, written by Joe Walsh, Joe Vitale, Ken Passarelli and Rocke Grace, courtesy of MCA Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 11 October 1993
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 October 1993
Production Date:
began 22 February 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
12 October 1993
Copyright Number:
PA659588
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32377
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While hunting in the backwoods of Arkansas, poor mountaineer Jedediah “Jed” Clampett accidentally strikes an oil well worth $1 billion. That evening, Aunt Pearl and Cousin Jethro Bodine advise Jed to sign a contract with Ozark Mountain Oil and move somewhere more luxurious, such as Beverly Hills, California. Jethro, Jed, and daughter Elly May Clampett pack their belongings in Jethro’s dilapidated jalopy, strapping their resistant Granny, Daisy May Moses, to her wooden chair on top of the car. Awaiting their arrival in California, Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills President Milburn Drysdale expects the newcomers to be refined and sophisticated individuals. As personal overseer of their account, Mr. Drysdale finds them a mansion in his affluent neighborhood and convinces his layabout son, Morgan, to show Elly May around school. Meanwhile, conniving but dim-witted bank employee Woodrow Tyler plans to extort the Clampetts with the help of his money-grubbing girl friend, Laura Jackson. Once they reach Beverly Hills, the bewildered Clampetts pull up to their lavish estate and explore the property, but Mr. Drysdale’s assistant, Jane Hathaway, mistakes them for burglars and telephones police. At the police station, Miss Hathaway and Mr. Drysdale are shocked to learn the rednecks are the Clampett billionaires. Although Mr. Drysdale fires Miss Hathaway, the kindhearted Jed requests she be reinstated as the family’s personal assistant. Concerned that any dissatisfaction will prompt the Clampetts to withdraw their money from his bank, Mr. Drysdale allows Jethro to drive his expensive Rolls Royce and promises him the position of vice president at his company. When Jed announces his intention to marry, Miss Hathaway is charged with finding him a wife. The Clampetts invite their new friends to dinner, ... +


While hunting in the backwoods of Arkansas, poor mountaineer Jedediah “Jed” Clampett accidentally strikes an oil well worth $1 billion. That evening, Aunt Pearl and Cousin Jethro Bodine advise Jed to sign a contract with Ozark Mountain Oil and move somewhere more luxurious, such as Beverly Hills, California. Jethro, Jed, and daughter Elly May Clampett pack their belongings in Jethro’s dilapidated jalopy, strapping their resistant Granny, Daisy May Moses, to her wooden chair on top of the car. Awaiting their arrival in California, Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills President Milburn Drysdale expects the newcomers to be refined and sophisticated individuals. As personal overseer of their account, Mr. Drysdale finds them a mansion in his affluent neighborhood and convinces his layabout son, Morgan, to show Elly May around school. Meanwhile, conniving but dim-witted bank employee Woodrow Tyler plans to extort the Clampetts with the help of his money-grubbing girl friend, Laura Jackson. Once they reach Beverly Hills, the bewildered Clampetts pull up to their lavish estate and explore the property, but Mr. Drysdale’s assistant, Jane Hathaway, mistakes them for burglars and telephones police. At the police station, Miss Hathaway and Mr. Drysdale are shocked to learn the rednecks are the Clampett billionaires. Although Mr. Drysdale fires Miss Hathaway, the kindhearted Jed requests she be reinstated as the family’s personal assistant. Concerned that any dissatisfaction will prompt the Clampetts to withdraw their money from his bank, Mr. Drysdale allows Jethro to drive his expensive Rolls Royce and promises him the position of vice president at his company. When Jed announces his intention to marry, Miss Hathaway is charged with finding him a wife. The Clampetts invite their new friends to dinner, which takes place at the family’s billiard table. As Woodrow Tyler barges in with a bouquet of flowers to welcome the Clampetts, he overhears Jed suggesting the beautiful but tomboyish Elly May should be more genteel, like her late mother. Jed is receptive to Mrs. Drysdale’s idea of hiring a French tutor, and Tyler shares this information with Laura. Intending to sabotage Jed’s prospective engagement, Laura poses as a French governess named “Laurette Voleur.” As the Clampetts settle in, Jethro begins work at the bank and helps Miss Hathaway write a personal advertisement to find Jed a suitable partner. Tyler eavesdrops, and Laura uses her newfound knowledge of Jed’s favorite foods and music to charm him. Despite Miss Hathaway’s attempts at discretion, Jethro rents a flashy billboard on Sunset Boulevard and produces a television commercial, drawing thousands of interested suitors to the office. At the high school, Elly May invites the student body to watch as she challenges a wrestling captain who has been bullying Morgan. She easily defeats him, and the coach asks her to take over as the team leader. Later, the Clampetts throw a birthday party for Jed, and everyone is impressed when Elly May arrives wearing an elegant evening gown. The new debutante accepts Morgan’s request to go on a date, and Miss Hathaway teases Jethro, with whom she has become smitten. While flirting with Jed, Laura plants the idea that she would make a proper wife and mother to Elly May. Jed agrees, and announces their betrothal to the guests. Once he signs the prenuptial papers, however, distrustful Granny catches Laura conspiring with Tyler about transferring the Clampett family fortune to a Swiss bank account. The two forcibly admit her to a retirement home, claiming she is mentally unstable. Suspecting foul play, Miss Hathaway files a missing persons report with police, and Detective Barnaby Jones uncovers Laura’s history of marrying wealthy men and stealing their money. With only hours until the wedding, Miss Hathaway telephones the Clampett residence to cancel the ceremony, but Tyler intercepts the call and purposely fails to relay the message to Mr. Drysdale. She disguises herself as a nurse and rescues Granny from the retirement home, where she was being treated with electroshock therapy. A swig of Granny’s homemade tonic revives her, and she reveals the details of Laura’s plan. Back at the Clampett estate, the ceremony begins, with Jed’s large extended family in attendance. Unable to get past security, Granny and Miss Hathaway barge in riding Jethro’s jalopy, which was recently outfitted with monster truck wheels. Amid the commotion, Tyler sets up his portable computer to perform the money transfer, but Jane grabs one of the Clampett relative’s shotguns and destroys the machine. Once the criminals are arrested, Jed encourages the Clampett clan to carry on with the party. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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