Coneheads (1993)

PG | 109 mins | Comedy, Science fiction | 23 July 1993

Director:

Steve Barron

Producer:

Lorne Michaels

Cinematographer:

Francis Kenny

Editor:

Paul Trejo

Production Designer:

Gregg Fonseca

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

The film incorporates footage from the television series, Star Trek (NBC, 8 Sep 1966—3 Jun 1969).
       According to a 25 Apr 1993 NYT article, after the surprising box-office success of Wayne’s World (1992, see entry), Paramount Pictures chairman Brandon Tartikoff contacted Saturday Night Live [ SNL ] (NBC, 1975—present) producer Lorne Michaels about developing more feature films inspired by the show’s television sketches. Michaels then approached creators Dan Aykroyd and Tom Davis about the potential of their recurring “Coneheads” sketch, which debuted in the 15 Jan 1977 episode. Aykroyd and Davis’s first draft of the screenplay was reportedly too focused on military action, and was changed to reflect the themes of immigration and suburban life, aided by the participation of Wayne’s World writers Bonnie and Terry Turner.
       Following an 11 Sep 1992 DV statement that Coneheads: The Movie was set to begin filming later that fall, the 13 Oct 1992 DV announced that Michaels had officially agreed to extend his contract with Paramount and begin production on the project, referred to by the working title, The Coneheads, along with Wayne’s World 2 (1993, see entry). Although the 20 Nov 1992 Screen International erroneously reported that Catherine O’Hara would play “Prymaat,” the role essayed by Jane Curtin in the television show, Aykroyd and Curtin both reprised their roles from the sketches. In her feature film debut, Michelle Burke was cast as their daughter “Connie,” replacing SNL comedienne Laraine Newman, who was instead cast as “Beldar’s” sister, “Laarta.” According to the 24 Jul 1993 Telegraph Journal ... More Less

The film incorporates footage from the television series, Star Trek (NBC, 8 Sep 1966—3 Jun 1969).
       According to a 25 Apr 1993 NYT article, after the surprising box-office success of Wayne’s World (1992, see entry), Paramount Pictures chairman Brandon Tartikoff contacted Saturday Night Live [ SNL ] (NBC, 1975—present) producer Lorne Michaels about developing more feature films inspired by the show’s television sketches. Michaels then approached creators Dan Aykroyd and Tom Davis about the potential of their recurring “Coneheads” sketch, which debuted in the 15 Jan 1977 episode. Aykroyd and Davis’s first draft of the screenplay was reportedly too focused on military action, and was changed to reflect the themes of immigration and suburban life, aided by the participation of Wayne’s World writers Bonnie and Terry Turner.
       Following an 11 Sep 1992 DV statement that Coneheads: The Movie was set to begin filming later that fall, the 13 Oct 1992 DV announced that Michaels had officially agreed to extend his contract with Paramount and begin production on the project, referred to by the working title, The Coneheads, along with Wayne’s World 2 (1993, see entry). Although the 20 Nov 1992 Screen International erroneously reported that Catherine O’Hara would play “Prymaat,” the role essayed by Jane Curtin in the television show, Aykroyd and Curtin both reprised their roles from the sketches. In her feature film debut, Michelle Burke was cast as their daughter “Connie,” replacing SNL comedienne Laraine Newman, who was instead cast as “Beldar’s” sister, “Laarta.” According to the 24 Jul 1993 Telegraph Journal of Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, Chris Farley’s “Ronnie Guestsetter” was written to replace the character portrayed by Bill Murray, since Murray was also considered too old to play a teenager. Jason Alexander and Lisa Jane Persky assumed the roles of the “Farbers,” replacing John Belushi and Gilda Radner, who died in 1982 and 1989, respectively. Farley and other cast members concurrently performing on Saturday Night Live were required to fly back and forth between New York City and the film set in Los Angeles, CA. Coneheads marked the feature film debuts of Ellen DeGeneres, Drew Carey, and Tim Meadows.
       After a 15 Dec 1992 HR brief indicated that filming was initially set to begin 25 Jan 1993, 2 Mar 1993 HR production charts confirmed a start date of 1 Feb 1993, in Los Angeles, CA. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Coneheads had a three-month shooting schedule. Filmmakers scouted NJ neighborhoods, taking reference photographs in order to re-create a suburban cul-de-sac and street of tract homes.
       To transform into “Coneheads,” the prosthetic “coning” process took roughly two hours for Aykroyd, Curtin, and Burke, who arrived before dawn each day. Since the foam latex structures were destroyed upon removal, a new piece was required for each day’s filming, resulting in the creation of nearly 1,000 “cones” by the David Miller Studio in North Hollywood, CA. Once the cones were shaped to fit molds of the actors’ heads, the material was baked for six hours to remove moisture, then applied to the skull with an adhesive called Pax Paint and blended into the skin with makeup.
       The 25 Apr 1993 NYT stated that the $300,000 “Remulak” arena set was used for a sequence which included a character named “Krathnor the Insistent,” who does not appear onscreen. The article also indicated that an additional scene was later shot on Stage 14 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, CA, depicting Beldar and Prymaat swearing U.S. citizenship before a judge. However, the scene is not included in the final film. Total production costs were estimated at $30 million.
       According to the 19 Aug 1993 DV, Composite Image Systems (CIS) was used for the creation of the main title graphic and in more than fifty special effects scenes. High-resolution scanning of film images for digital compositing took roughly six weeks to complete.
       A 31 Aug 1993 HR story indicated that special effects technicians on both Coneheads and Super Mario Bros. (1993, see entry) used “Flame” image processing software. Following the pictures’ releases in summer 1993, Canadian-based companies Softimage Inc. and Discreet Logic Inc. fought for ownership of the program, as well as credit and payment for its use in these films. The outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined, and Coneheads does not give onscreen credit to either company.
       As part of the film’s marketing, Paramount printed an advertisement in various major magazines that parodied the marketing campaigns of clothing retailer, The Gap. According to the 15 Jul 1993 NYT, The Gap issued a court order against further use of the advertisement, which Paramount honored. The article stated that additional promotional efforts included the manufacture of 50,000 Conehead prosthetics for people to wear in public settings, such as public transit. The May 1993 Box noted that Subway restaurants beat out Burger King for featured product placement within the film, and that companies such as Playmates Toys, Masquerade, and Winterland Productions were contributing to the manufacture of licensed Coneheads –related products.
       The 21 Jul 1993 DV stated that the premiere took place 19 Jul 1993, at Mann’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood.
       After the film’s release, the 18 Jul 1993 LAT reported that “Zippy the Pinhead” comic strip creator Bill Griffith published a series of cartoons accusing Aykroyd of basing the “Conehead” characters on Zippy. While the article reported it was “common knowledge” that “Zippy the Pinhead” was the inspiration for the SNL skit at the time of its creation, Griffith did not assert his comic strip was a source for the characters until after the release of the feature film, and ultimately did not pursue legal action against any of the parties involved in developing the Coneheads sketches or theatrical release. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
May 1993.
---
Daily Variety
11 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1992.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1993.
---
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jul 1993
p. 27, 30.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jul 1993
p. 1.
New York Times
25 Apr 1993
p. 34, 38.
New York Times
15 Jul 1993.
---
New York Times
23 Jul 1993
Section C, p. 3.
Screen International
20 Nov 1992.
---
Telegraph Journal
24 Jul 1993
p. 6.
Variety
1 Aug 1993
pp. 43-44.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Lorne Michaels Productions
A Steve Barron Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Steadicam/B cam op
Steadicam focus puller
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Video supv
Video eng
Remote crane supplied by
Remote crane tech
Musco light by, Musco Mobil Lighting, Ltd.
Musco light by, Musco Mobil Lighting, Ltd.
Musco light by, Musco Mobil Lighting, Ltd.
Night lights by
Cam cars and cranes provided by
Nettman cam remote systems by
Fries Mitchel cams provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Visual consultant
Asst to the prod des
Art dept coord
Asst art dept coord
Asst art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Leadperson
Prop master
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const gen foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Paint foreperson
Prod painter
Set painter
Sculptor
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Asst cost des
MUSIC
Orig score
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Music preparation
Mus orch and cond by
Addl orch by
Addl orch by
Orch contractor
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Utility sd
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Initial graphic des by
Computer sketching by
Titles and opticals by
Visual eff supv
Visual eff des
Visual eff des
Matte painting supv
Digital anim supv
Digital matte painting
Digital matte painting
Eff anim
Eff anim
Paintbox artist
Visual eff coord
Visual eff coord
Visual eff ed
Visual eff asst ed
Visual eff dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
Visual eff photog unit
Visual eff photog unit
Visual eff photog unit
Visual eff photog unit
Visual eff photog unit
Visual eff photog unit
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Monster Garthok created by
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature eff by, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Motion control photog by
Motion control photog by, Image G
Motion control photog by, Image G
Motion control photog by, Image G
Motion control photog by, Image G
Motion control photog by, Image G
Motion control photog by, Image G
Approach to Remulak seq by
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Approach to Remulak seq by, Video Image/VIFX
Digital visual eff composited by
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital visual eff composited by, Composite Image
Digital film rec by
Digital film rec by, EFILM
Digital film rec by, EFILM
Digital film rec by, EFILM
Digital film rec by, EFILM
Digital film rec by, EFILM
Digital compositing by
a division of Dream Quest Images
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital compositing by, Motion Pixel Corporation
Digital film services provided by
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by, Cinesite, Inc.
Digital film services provided by
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital film services provided by, Sidley Wright &
Digital opticals by
Digital opticals by, Digital Magic
Digital opticals by, Digital Magic
Digital opticals by, Digital Magic
Digital eff
Paris, France
Digital eff, Ex Machina
Digital eff, Ex Machina
Digital eff, Ex Machina
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
Digital eff, David Miller Studio Conehead Prosthet
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Conehead makeup des and created by
Prosthetic makeup
Prosthetic makeup
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Voice casting by
Asst to Mr. Barron
Asst to Mr. Michaels
Asst to Mr. Michaels
Asst to Mr. Rachmil
Asst to Ms. Minot
Asst to Mr. Thompson
Prod assoc
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Casting asst
Extras casting
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Animal trainer
Animal trainer, PhD. Animals
Craft service
Marine coord
Marine coord, Studio Sea
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
MUSIC
Music from Star Trek TV series, by Sol Kaplan and Fred Steiner
"The Lincoln Memorial," by Bernard Herrmann, from The Day the Earth Stood Still, courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.
SONGS
"Fight The Power," by Carlton Ridenhour, Keith Shocklee and Eric Sadler, performed by Barenaked Ladies, courtesy of Sire Records Company
"Mia Marina," written, performed and produced by Michael Muhlfriedel and Chris Guardino
"Chale Jao," written and produced by T. Bailey, performed by Babble
+
SONGS
"Fight The Power," by Carlton Ridenhour, Keith Shocklee and Eric Sadler, performed by Barenaked Ladies, courtesy of Sire Records Company
"Mia Marina," written, performed and produced by Michael Muhlfriedel and Chris Guardino
"Chale Jao," written and produced by T. Bailey, performed by Babble
"Little Renee," written and performed by Digable Planets, produced by Butterfly, co-produced by Ladybug, Digable Planets performs courtesy of Pendulum Records
"Kodachrome®," written and performed by Paul Simon, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products, Kodachrome® is a registered trademark for Color Film
"You Got The Right One Baby, Uh-Huh," by Al Merrin and Peter Cofield
"Tainted Love," by Edward C. Cobb, performed by Soft Cell, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets
"Communion," by Deborah Harry and Guy Pratt, performed by Deborah Harry, courtesy of Sire Records Company/Reprise Records
"It's A Free World Baby," by John Michael Stipe, William Berry, Peter Buck and Mike Mills, performed by R.E.M., courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc.
"Silk Cuts," written, performed and produced by Michael Muhlfriedel and Chris Guardino
"Soul To Squeeze," by Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Jonathan Frusciante and Chad Smith, performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Devil With The Blue Dress On," by Frederick Long and William Stevenson
"Moonlight Cha-Cha," written, performed and produced by Michael Muhlfriedel and Chris Guardino
"Me and Mrs. Jones," by Leon Huff, Kenneth Gamble and Cary Gilbert, performed by Billy Paul, courtesy of Sony Music by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Magic Carpet Ride," by John Kay and Rushton Moreve, performed by Slash and Michael Monroe, produced by Mike Clink and Slash, Slash performs courtesy of Geffen Records, Inc.
"No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)," by Paul Jabara and Bruce Roberts, performed by k.d. lang and Andy Bell, courtesy of Sire Records Company/Mute Records Ltd.
"Conehead Vibe," written by Dimi Sloane, Jazzy Everett and Eric Harris, performed by Nu Blooz, produced by Dimi Sloane
"Can't Take My Eyes Off Of You," by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, performed by Morten Harket, produced by Stephen Hague, Morten Harket performs courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Conehead Love," written and produced by Peter Aykroyd and Bruce Gowdy, performed by Beldar and Prymaat with Nan Schaefer.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Coneheads
Coneheads: The Movie
Release Date:
23 July 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 July 1993
New York opening: week of 23 July 1993
Production Date:
1 February--April 1993 in Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
24 August 1993
Copyright Number:
PA625507
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
109
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32543
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After evading U.S. Air Force pursuit and crashing his damaged spaceship into New York’s East River, Beldar Clorhone, a humanoid alien with an elongated, cone-shaped skull, checks into a motel with his female mate, Prymaat. Inspecting the amenities inside their room, they conclude that they must adapt to human, or “Bluntskull,” society until they are rescued. Over the next few weeks, Beldar establishes himself as an efficient employee at Otto’s Appliance Repair shop, while secretly collecting mechanical parts to build a hailing device. He contacts his brother-in-law on the planet Remulak, Marlax Zanthstram, who expresses his disappointment in their failure to conquer Earth, and claims that a rescue vessel will not be sent for several years. Prymaat announces she is pregnant, and Otto, realizing that Beldar is an illegal alien, arranges to have his friend, Carmine, find them false identities. Beldar easily memorizes his new information as “Donald R. DeCicco,” but Immigration and Nationalization Service (INS) Agent Eli Turnbull and his sadistic boss, District Chief Gorman Seedling, immediately notice the discrepancy in their records. With the identical name stolen many times in the past, Seedling becomes fixated on catching the perpetrator, and leads a team of policemen to Beldar and Prymaat’s trailer home. Although the aliens escape, Seedling confiscates their Remulak clothing and a diagram of their spaceship for further inspection. However, when it is found that both articles are made of unidentifiable materials, Seedling excitedly deduces that their subjects are from another planet. Using a turban to cover his oblong head, Beldar takes a job as a New York City taxi driver and moves into his employer’s basement. Upon the birth of their child, Beldar and Prymaat decide ... +


After evading U.S. Air Force pursuit and crashing his damaged spaceship into New York’s East River, Beldar Clorhone, a humanoid alien with an elongated, cone-shaped skull, checks into a motel with his female mate, Prymaat. Inspecting the amenities inside their room, they conclude that they must adapt to human, or “Bluntskull,” society until they are rescued. Over the next few weeks, Beldar establishes himself as an efficient employee at Otto’s Appliance Repair shop, while secretly collecting mechanical parts to build a hailing device. He contacts his brother-in-law on the planet Remulak, Marlax Zanthstram, who expresses his disappointment in their failure to conquer Earth, and claims that a rescue vessel will not be sent for several years. Prymaat announces she is pregnant, and Otto, realizing that Beldar is an illegal alien, arranges to have his friend, Carmine, find them false identities. Beldar easily memorizes his new information as “Donald R. DeCicco,” but Immigration and Nationalization Service (INS) Agent Eli Turnbull and his sadistic boss, District Chief Gorman Seedling, immediately notice the discrepancy in their records. With the identical name stolen many times in the past, Seedling becomes fixated on catching the perpetrator, and leads a team of policemen to Beldar and Prymaat’s trailer home. Although the aliens escape, Seedling confiscates their Remulak clothing and a diagram of their spaceship for further inspection. However, when it is found that both articles are made of unidentifiable materials, Seedling excitedly deduces that their subjects are from another planet. Using a turban to cover his oblong head, Beldar takes a job as a New York City taxi driver and moves into his employer’s basement. Upon the birth of their child, Beldar and Prymaat decide to find a more respectable home, narrowly evading Seedling and Turnbull’s search. Moments after arresting Beldar’s boss, Seedling receives word that he has been promoted to Southwest Assistant Deputy Commissioner, and decides to instantly abandon the DiCicco investigation. Relocating to Paramus, New Jersey, Beldar and Prymaat pose as French immigrants and raise their daughter, Connie, with the surname, “Conehead.” Now a teenager, Connie’s habits annoy her overprotective father, but her knowledge of machinery enchants automobile mechanic Ronnie Guestsetter, who takes her on a date. As she assumes the role of a suburban housewife, Prymaat grows conscious of her appearance and befriends the neighbor, Lisa Farber, who warns her that Beldar may be unfaithful. However, Beldar rejects the amorous advances of one of the students at his driving school, and becomes obsessed with winning a golf tournament at the local country club. As their relationship progresses, Ronnie becomes frustrated by Connie’s lack of affection and attempts to pressure her into having sex. Beldar upsets his daughter by threatening Ronnie, who repeatedly apologizes until Connie forgives her boyfriend for his behavior. Meanwhile, Seedling’s promotion is withheld until he can validate his expenditures on the DiCicco case, forcing him to reopen the file. Turnbull eventually finds a newspaper advertisement for Beldar’s driving school and traces the Coneheads to Paramus. On the day of the neighborhood costume party, Turnbull and Seedling pose as Jehovah’s Witnesses and enter the Conehead home, but their conversation is interrupted by a message on the alien hailing device, informing them that the rescue vessel will arrive later that night. At the celebration, Connie is distraught to learn that she will be forced to leave without saying good-bye to Ronnie. When her father is preoccupied accepting his trophy for winning the golf tournament, Connie sneaks Ronnie back to her house, where they partake in her species’ mating ritual. Moments after Beldar and Prymaat return home and attempt to flee, the INS surround their cul-de-sac. The alien rescue vessel suddenly appears, lifting the Coneheads’ car into the sky with Seedling and Turnbull clinging to the bumper. On Remulak, the two INS agents are presented as slaves to the Highmaster Mentot, who is unimpressed with Beldar’s sparse Earth souvenirs and offended by the dental work he has undergone to hide his once-pointed teeth. Accusing him of treason, the Highmaster sentences Beldar to battle a vicious creature called a Garthok. Although the Garthok kills the other criminals on trial, Beldar constructs a makeshift golf club and hits a rock into the creature’s throat, choking it to death. Victorious, Beldar asks to be returned to Earth to conquer the “Bluntskulls,” accompanied by his family, Seedling, and a fleet of spaceships. Heeding his daughter’s disapproval, Beldar fakes an attack on his fleet, forcing the other ships to return to Remulak while he evacuates and detonates his own vessel. The Highmaster and Turnbull, his new assistant, believe the aliens and Seedling were killed in battle. Still under Beldar’s enslavement, Seedling agrees to allow the aliens to stay in the U.S., and the Coneheads resume suburban life by seeing Connie and Ronnie off to their high school prom. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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