Father Hood (1993)

PG-13 | 95 mins | Comedy-drama, Adventure | 27 August 1993

Writer:

Scott Spencer

Cinematographer:

Mark Vicente

Editor:

David Heitner

Production Designer:

David Barkham

Production Companies:

Hollywood Pictures , Rare Touch Productions
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HISTORY

The film opens with a scene featuring characters “Kathleen Mercer,” “Eddie Charles,” and “Kelly Charles” as they reunite with their father, “Jack Charles,” upon his release from prison. Actress Sabrina Lloyd provides voice-over narration: “I guess not every girl in the world has to wait in the hot sun for her father to get out of jail. But I didn’t care about that. I just wanted us to be together again. I used to be pretty angry at him. Eddie was too. We figured he kinda dumped us. But it wasn’t that simple. We’ve all done a lot of growing up since the bad old days. You see, the thing about Jack—I don’t know— he kind of grows on you.” When they embrace, she continues, “Look at us. The perfect, happy family, right? Well, trust me, it wasn’t always like this.” The story then jumps back fifteen months earlier to depict the events leading up to Jack’s incarceration.
       End credits include thanks from producers to the following: “San Antonio Film Commission, Kathy Rhoads—Director; Judge Leif Clark; San Antonio Police Department; New Orleans Mayor Sidney J. Barthelemy; New Orleans Film and Television Board, Kimberly M. Carbo—Liaison, Tom McDermott—Chairman; St. James Parish Police Department, Lt. Travis St. Pierre; Louisiana Office of Film and Video, Phil Seifert; Louisiana State Police; Louisiana Dept. of Transportation and Development; M/V Sen. Alvin T. Stumpf, Capt. John Swadener; Las Vegas Metropolitan Police; Nevada Motion Picture and TV Division, Bob Hirsch—Director; Nevada Highway Patrol; Valley of Fire State Park; Arizona State Police; Hoover Dam; U.S. Department of Interior; U.S. Bureau of Land Management; People and cities of San Antonio, New Orleans, Las Vegas & Los Angeles.”
       ... More Less

The film opens with a scene featuring characters “Kathleen Mercer,” “Eddie Charles,” and “Kelly Charles” as they reunite with their father, “Jack Charles,” upon his release from prison. Actress Sabrina Lloyd provides voice-over narration: “I guess not every girl in the world has to wait in the hot sun for her father to get out of jail. But I didn’t care about that. I just wanted us to be together again. I used to be pretty angry at him. Eddie was too. We figured he kinda dumped us. But it wasn’t that simple. We’ve all done a lot of growing up since the bad old days. You see, the thing about Jack—I don’t know— he kind of grows on you.” When they embrace, she continues, “Look at us. The perfect, happy family, right? Well, trust me, it wasn’t always like this.” The story then jumps back fifteen months earlier to depict the events leading up to Jack’s incarceration.
       End credits include thanks from producers to the following: “San Antonio Film Commission, Kathy Rhoads—Director; Judge Leif Clark; San Antonio Police Department; New Orleans Mayor Sidney J. Barthelemy; New Orleans Film and Television Board, Kimberly M. Carbo—Liaison, Tom McDermott—Chairman; St. James Parish Police Department, Lt. Travis St. Pierre; Louisiana Office of Film and Video, Phil Seifert; Louisiana State Police; Louisiana Dept. of Transportation and Development; M/V Sen. Alvin T. Stumpf, Capt. John Swadener; Las Vegas Metropolitan Police; Nevada Motion Picture and TV Division, Bob Hirsch—Director; Nevada Highway Patrol; Valley of Fire State Park; Arizona State Police; Hoover Dam; U.S. Department of Interior; U.S. Bureau of Land Management; People and cities of San Antonio, New Orleans, Las Vegas & Los Angeles.”
       Actor Josh Lucas is credited onscreen as “Joshua Lucas.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, producer Nicholas Pileggi had written a series of New York magazine articles investigating child care homes, and conceived the idea for a feature film based on a real-life incident involving a father who abducts his children from an abusive foster home. Director Darrell James Roodt joined the production with producers Gillian Gorfil and Anant Singh, who had collaborated with Roodt on six previous films in his home country of South Africa. At the time, Gorfil and Roodt were developing another project together, but they decided to put it on hold for the chance to work on their first American feature. The 21 Sep 1992 HR announced the casting of Patrick Swayze, as well as the involvement of Rare Touch Productions and Hollywood Pictures. Various HR items indicated that the film went through numerous title changes, and was known as Untitled Darrell James Roodt, Desperado, Jack of Hearts, Honor Among Thieves, and Untitled Patrick Swayze, before its final release title, Father Hood.
       Principal photography began 16 Nov 1992, in the small town of Helotes, outside San Antonio, TX. Filming then moved to the Louisiana bayous, and also took place on a ferry traveling to New Orleans. Additional locations included Hoover Dam and the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada.
       Leading up to the 27 Aug 1993 Los Angeles release, the 21 Jun 1993 Long Beach Press-Telegram reported that actress Halle Berry questioned Hollywood Pictures’ promotional tactics, which misleadingly suggested the film contained a romance between her and Swayze’s characters. According to Berry, she and Swayze considered adding a romantic element during production, but ultimately decided against it.
       Reception was generally negative. In his 27 Aug 1993 LAT review, Michael Wilmington praised the photography of the film’s locations, but claimed that the script’s “dim” themes and dialogue were only marginally elevated by the actors’ performances. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1992
p. 1, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 1993
p. 5, 12.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
21 Jun 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Aug 1993
Calendar, p. 14.
Variety
6 Sep 1993
p. 27.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Hollywood Pictures presents
A Darrell James Roodt Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
1st asst dir/2d unit
2d asst dir/2d unit
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op/Steadicam® op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit dir of photog
Aerial cam dir of photog
Aerial cam 1st asst cam
Still photog
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Musco light tech
Prod asst, San Antonio crew
Addl cam op, New Orleans crew
Addl cam asst, New Orleans crew
Addl cam asst, New Orleans crew
Addl cam asst, New Orleans crew
Studio teacher, New Orleans crew
Addl cam op, Las Vegas crew
Addl cam asst, Las Vegas crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadperson
Prop master
Prop master
Asst props
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Standby painter
Const coord, San Antonio crew
Const foreman, San Antonio crew
Set dresser, San Antonio crew
Set dresser, New Orleans crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ward supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer, San Antonio crew
Set costumer, New Orleans crew
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer, Las Vegas crew
SOUND
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Digital sd ed
Digital sd ed
Digital sd ed
Digital sd ed
Digital sd ed
Digital sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Post prod sd by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
Diane Ladd's makeup
Hairstylist, New Orleans crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
ADR voice casting
ADR voice casting, The Loopys
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Helicopter coord
Marine coord
Marine coord, Studio Sea
Consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Unit pub
Prod coord
Prod assoc
Asst prod coord
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Asst to Patrick Swayze
Asst to Mr. Roodt & Ms. Gorfil
Asst to Mr. Singh
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Payroll auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
First aid
Craft service
Studio teacher
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Mr. Swayze's driver
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting coord
Loc asst, San Antonio crew
Prod asst, San Antonio crew
Prod asst, San Antonio crew
Prod asst, San Antonio crew
Extras casting, San Antonio crew
Extras casting, Republic Casting, San Antonio crew
Transportation capt, San Antonio crew
Transportation capt, San Antonio crew
Loc asst, New Orleans crew
Prod asst, New Orleans crew
Prod asst, New Orleans crew
Extras casting, New Orleans crew
Studio teacher, New Orleans crew
Transportation capt, New Orleans crew
Loc asst, Las Vegas crew
Prod asst, Las Vegas crew
Extras casting, Las Vegas crew
Prod services provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Can't Run From Yourself," written by Marshall Chapman, performed by Tanya Tucker, courtesy of Liberty Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)," written by Edward Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland, performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"Your True Love," written by Carl Perkins, performed by Stray Cats, courtesy of Toshiba/EMI Records
+
SONGS
"Can't Run From Yourself," written by Marshall Chapman, performed by Tanya Tucker, courtesy of Liberty Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)," written by Edward Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland, performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"Your True Love," written by Carl Perkins, performed by Stray Cats, courtesy of Toshiba/EMI Records
"Flying Saucers Rock & Roll," written by Ray Scott, performed by Stray Cats, courtesy of Toshiba/EMI Records
"You've Really Got A Hold On Me," written by William "Smokey" Robinson, performed by Smokey Robinson, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"Feels Like Home," written by Mark Keefner and Mayf Nutter, performed by Mark Keefner
"Time On My Hands," written and performed by Tom Bohn
"Hometalk," written by John Leyden, Kevin Botha, Sipho Bhengo and Jack Lerole, performed by Mango Groove, courtesy of Status Music Ltd.
"Shot Gun Boogie," written and performed by Tennessee Ernie Ford, courtesy of Liberty Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"You're A Wonderful One," written by Edward Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland, performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"When I'm Gone," written by William "Smokey" Robinson, performed by Brenda Holloway, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"Cold Hands, Warm Heart," written by Marc Ferrari, performed by Michael Mulholland
"Bye And Bye (When The Morning Comes)," performed by Jolly Reeds and Steamin' Horns, courtesy of GHB Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Untitled Darrell James Roodt
Desperado
Jack of Hearts
Honor Among Thieves
Untitled Patrick Swayze
Release Date:
27 August 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 27 August 1993
Production Date:
began 16 November 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Pictures, an accepted alternative of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
1 September 1993
Copyright Number:
PA620752
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®; Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32553
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Two years after the death of his wife and the seizure of his children by the state of California, petty criminal Jack Charles meets with his lawyer to discuss the terms of his impending jail sentence for robbing an undercover policeman posing as a drug dealer. Although he promises to stay out of trouble until he meets with the judge, Jack is surprised to find his teenage daughter Kelly at his Los Angeles apartment after breaking out of Bigelow Hall juvenile center. Kelly says that her seven-year-old brother, Eddie, is being moved from his foster home to the abusive, prison-like confines of Bigelow, and begs her father to have them transferred to a different facility. He ignores her pleas, and makes plans to steal $250,000 from a drug dealer in New Orleans, Louisiana. On the way back to Bigelow, Jack changes his mind and goes to court to request his children’s transfer. While the judge doubts Jack’s claims that Bigelow staff handcuffs the children, Kelly and Jack watch from their car as Lazzaro, the Bigelow overseer, shackles Eddie and the orphans and loads them onto a bus. Furious, Jack pulls his car in front of the bus and holds Lazzaro at gunpoint until he releases Eddie and Kelly’s pregnant friend, Delores. Evading police, Jack drops Delores at her former foster house and drives his children to see their grandmother, Rita, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Jack finds Rita gambling in a casino and pulls her away from the table moments before a security guard can apprehend her for cheating. Shocked to meet her grandchildren, Rita agrees to let them stay for one night, but scolds her son when he attempts ... +


Two years after the death of his wife and the seizure of his children by the state of California, petty criminal Jack Charles meets with his lawyer to discuss the terms of his impending jail sentence for robbing an undercover policeman posing as a drug dealer. Although he promises to stay out of trouble until he meets with the judge, Jack is surprised to find his teenage daughter Kelly at his Los Angeles apartment after breaking out of Bigelow Hall juvenile center. Kelly says that her seven-year-old brother, Eddie, is being moved from his foster home to the abusive, prison-like confines of Bigelow, and begs her father to have them transferred to a different facility. He ignores her pleas, and makes plans to steal $250,000 from a drug dealer in New Orleans, Louisiana. On the way back to Bigelow, Jack changes his mind and goes to court to request his children’s transfer. While the judge doubts Jack’s claims that Bigelow staff handcuffs the children, Kelly and Jack watch from their car as Lazzaro, the Bigelow overseer, shackles Eddie and the orphans and loads them onto a bus. Furious, Jack pulls his car in front of the bus and holds Lazzaro at gunpoint until he releases Eddie and Kelly’s pregnant friend, Delores. Evading police, Jack drops Delores at her former foster house and drives his children to see their grandmother, Rita, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Jack finds Rita gambling in a casino and pulls her away from the table moments before a security guard can apprehend her for cheating. Shocked to meet her grandchildren, Rita agrees to let them stay for one night, but scolds her son when he attempts to sneak away after dark. In the morning, she alerts him that several newspaper headlines are labeling him as a “madman,” and the Charles family is forced to continue their journey east. When a police officer spots them, a high-speed car chase ensues until the squad car flips over. To put an end to the children’s constant whining, Jack stops at Hoover Dam and telephones Kathleen Mercer, writer of one of the newspaper articles, to complain about her erroneous reporting. When police catch up to them, Jack rigs another tourist’s car to drive over the cliff, leading onlookers to believe he was inside and died in the resulting explosion. After reuniting with Kelly and Eddie, Jack steals another car and they head to New Orleans. At a roadside bar, Jack again telephones Kathleen to dispute certain points she published about Kelly’s previous life in foster care. Eager to hear the truth behind his story, Kathleen asks him to question his daughter about Bigelow’s problematic disciplining policies. When she hears that Kelly’s pregnant friend Delores has been seized from her foster mother and returned to Bigelow, Kathleen investigates the institution for corruption. Meanwhile, as the hour grows late, Jack begins to doze at the wheel and forces Kelly to drive. Just after daybreak, Kelly swerves to avoid colliding with a semi-trailer truck, and crashes their car. Escaping on foot, the fugitives jump into a speedboat hitched to another traveler’s pickup truck, and help themselves to the owner’s food. As they eat, Jack asks if Kelly was ever sexually abused in Bigelow. The girl defensively denies it, and when the driver stops, Jack uses a payphone to call Kathleen, informing her of his suspicion that his daughter was mistreated. While on the phone, the owner of the boat drives away with Kelly and Eddie still onboard. Jack eventually catches up to them, but Kelly is annoyed that her father’s reckless behavior is setting a bad example for Eddie, who has grown attached to him. Once the boat is docked in a Louisiana lake, Jack turns on the engine and hijacks the vessel through the wetlands. Pursued by police and news helicopters, Kelly sets off a flare gun, creating a smoke screen that allows them to jump overboard undetected. The fugitives hitchhike to New Orleans to find Jack’s contact, Jerry. On the phone with Kathleen, Jack learns that his lawyer has negotiated a reduced, two-year sentence if he agrees to return to Los Angeles and testify against Lazzaro’s corrupt foster care system. Jack refuses. The next morning, Kelly is dejected when she reunites with Andy, a former Bigelow intern, whose friendliness she misinterpreted as affection. Later, Jack and Jerry drive onto a ferryboat to meet the drug dealers they intend to rob, hoping to garner enough money to move to Belize and start a new life. In the middle of the operation, however, Jack realizes his children are hiding in the trunk. When he gets out of the car to release them, the drug dealers flee, shooting Jerry in the scuffle. Although Jack considers killing them and stealing the money for himself, he remembers the presence of his children and puts his gun away. Back in Los Angeles, Lazzaro appears in court, asserting that Kelly is a “troubled youth” who ran away to pursue her obsession with Andy. After a brief meeting, Jack and Kathleen barge into the courtroom, and Jack offers his defense, assisted by Kelly’s implication that Lazzaro witnessed and subsequently ignored her sexual assault at Bigelow. In an emotional speech, Jack pleads for the custody of his children after the completion of his two-year sentence. On the day of his release, Kelly and Eddie wait with Kathleen outside the prison and greet their father with a hug. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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