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HISTORY

       Although not credited onscreen, the character "Thomas Reilly" sings "The Star-Spangled Banner," by John Stafford Smith and Francis Scott Key.
       According to a 15 Aug 1993 LAT item, in 1987, Loyola Marymount University film student Gregory Hansen collaborated with his brother, Erik, to create a 16mm short film titled, Seven Souls, about a man “accompanied through life by the souls of six people who had died the night he was born.” The brothers adapted the story into a feature-length screenplay at the insistence of their agent, Nancy Roberts. Although the Hansens were originally supposed to direct and produce the project as well, Universal Pictures decided to expand the budget to hire “more prominent star talent,” including director Ron Underwood, who first expressed interest when the script was completed in 1991. The 19 Mar 1992 DV indicated that the feature shared a working title with the original short film before it was later changed to Heart and Souls. Roberts, serving as producer with Sean Daniel, hired her clients Brent Maddock and S. S. Wilson, who wrote Underwood’s debut feature, Tremors (1990, see entry), to provide rewrites up through the early weeks of production. Since Maddock and Wilson reduced the number of “souls” in the story to four, added a comedic tone, and edited the dialogue, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) determined that that duo would receive first credit for the screenplay, while Gregory and Erik Hansen received first credit for the film’s screen story.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that principal photography began 1 Dec 1992 in Los Angeles, CA, before production moved to San Francisco, ... More Less

       Although not credited onscreen, the character "Thomas Reilly" sings "The Star-Spangled Banner," by John Stafford Smith and Francis Scott Key.
       According to a 15 Aug 1993 LAT item, in 1987, Loyola Marymount University film student Gregory Hansen collaborated with his brother, Erik, to create a 16mm short film titled, Seven Souls, about a man “accompanied through life by the souls of six people who had died the night he was born.” The brothers adapted the story into a feature-length screenplay at the insistence of their agent, Nancy Roberts. Although the Hansens were originally supposed to direct and produce the project as well, Universal Pictures decided to expand the budget to hire “more prominent star talent,” including director Ron Underwood, who first expressed interest when the script was completed in 1991. The 19 Mar 1992 DV indicated that the feature shared a working title with the original short film before it was later changed to Heart and Souls. Roberts, serving as producer with Sean Daniel, hired her clients Brent Maddock and S. S. Wilson, who wrote Underwood’s debut feature, Tremors (1990, see entry), to provide rewrites up through the early weeks of production. Since Maddock and Wilson reduced the number of “souls” in the story to four, added a comedic tone, and edited the dialogue, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) determined that that duo would receive first credit for the screenplay, while Gregory and Erik Hansen received first credit for the film’s screen story.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that principal photography began 1 Dec 1992 in Los Angeles, CA, before production moved to San Francisco, CA, for five weeks of exterior filming. Locations included the Stockton Street Tunnel, Pacific Heights, the San Francisco Opera House, the Civic Auditorium, and the Golden Gate Park’s Conservatory of Flowers, which was also re-created on a Universal Studios soundstage. The 10 Aug 1993 LAT listed a production cost of roughly $25 million.
       An advertisement in the 31 Jul 1993 LAT indicated that a “sneak preview” screening was held that evening at several theaters in the Los Angeles area. According to a 13 Aug 1993 DV news item, the premiere took place 11 Aug 1993 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Los Angeles. The 10 Aug 1993 LAT stated the picture opened 13 Aug 1993 in 1,200 theaters.
      End production credits are preceded by the statement: “Dedicated to Dirk Petersmann,” referring to the film’s line producer and unit production manager, who died of cancer on 13 Jun 1993, before the film’s release. The following acknowledgments also appear in end credits: “‘The Donna Reed Show’ courtesy of Columbia Pictures Television,” and, “Special thanks to: Lou Malacarne, S & The 3 Ls, Molly Petit, the San Francisco Film and Video Arts Commission, the San Bernadino/Riverside County Film Commission, Sid Seidenberg, Tina Brincat.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1992.
---
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1993
p. 5, 22.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Aug 1993
p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1993
Calendar, p. 26.
New York Times
13 Aug 1993
Section C, p. 14.
Variety
25 Jun 1993.
---
Variety
16 Aug 1993
p. 39.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures Presents
An Alphaville/Stampede Entertainment Production
A Ron Underwood Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
2d 2d asst dir, San Francisco crew
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Line prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Scr story by
Scr story by
Scr story by
Scr story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam loader
Steadicam op
1st asst B-cam
Video asst
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting teh
Universal best boy elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
Grip
Still photog
Addl 2d cam asst, San Francisco crew
Lighting tech, San Francisco crew
Lighting tech, San Francisco crew
Grip, San Francisco crew
Grip, San Francisco crew
Cranes & dollies by
"Wescam" provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Conceptual artist
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Prod buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
Drapery foreman
Prop master
Asst prop master
2d asst props
Const coord
Gen foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Labor foreman
2d labor foreman
Gang boss/Purchaser
Paint foreman
Stand-by painter
Greensman
Const auditor
Leadman, San Francisco crew
2d prop asst, San Francisco crew
Const foreman, San Francisco crew
Standby painter, San Francisco crew
Set dresser, San Francisco crew
Set dresser, San Francisco crew
Set dresser, San Francisco crew
Draper, San Francisco crew
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Asst cost des
Set costumer, San Francisco crew
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Addl mus ed
Mus rec & mixed by
Score cond by
Orchestrator
Orchestrator
Orchestrator
Mus prod assoc
Mus contractor
Addl orchestrator
Addl orchestrator
Asst scoring eng
Asst scoring eng
Asst scoring eng
Asst scoring eng
Asst scoring eng
On cam mus contractor
Addl mus cond by
SOUND
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Cable op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
ADR rec
ADR group coord
ADR group coord
Processed eff by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Cableman, San Francisco crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff prod
Visual eff supv, Pacific Data Images, Inc.
Visual eff supv, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Supv dir of photog, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Visual eff coord
Visual eff conceptual artist
Vista Vision op
Greenscreen lighting
Visual eff prod
Exec prod
Art dir
Tech supv
Anim supv
Anim supv
Lead anim
Anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Digital 1/O supv
Visual eff line-up
Film rec
Software development
Software development
Visual eff prod
Dir of photog
Visual eff line-up
Line prod
Miniature supv
Miniature mechanical eff
Gaffer
Miniature fabrication & operation
Miniature fabrication & operation
Miniature fabrication & operation
Miniature fabrication & operation
Miniature fabrication & operation
Model builder
Model builder
Model builder
Model builder
Model builder
Grip & elec
Grip & elec
Prod asst
Vista Vision cams
Digital/Opt wire removals by, Visual Eff
Opt printing
Motion control cam
Digital retouch
Opticals
Spec eff tech, San Francisco crew
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Makeup artist, San Francisco crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Underwood
Asst to Ms. Roberts
Asst to Mr. Petersmann
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Cam car driver
Chapman crane driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Albert
Asst to Mr. Downey
Asst to Mr. Grodin
Animals supplied by
Head animal trainer
Craft service
Craft service
Set medic
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Teacher
Angel sculpture
Asst prod coord, San Francisco crew
Prod asst, San Francisco crew
Prod asst, San Francisco crew
Extras casting, San Francisco crew
S.F. loc mgr, San Francisco crew
Loc coord, San Francisco crew
Loc asst, San Francisco crew
Loc asst, San Francisco crew
Loc asst, San Francisco crew
Loc asst, San Francisco crew
Transportation co-capt, San Francisco crew
Craft service, San Francisco crew
Paramedic coord, San Francisco crew
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short film Seven Souls written by Gregory Hansen.
SONGS
"Walk Like A Man," written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, performed by Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, courtesy of The Four Seasons Partnership, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Al Dubin and Harry Warren, performed by The Flamingos, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera Sera)," written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, performed by Doris Day, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
+
SONGS
"Walk Like A Man," written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, performed by Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, courtesy of The Four Seasons Partnership, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Al Dubin and Harry Warren, performed by The Flamingos, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera Sera)," written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, performed by Doris Day, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"What'd I Say," written and performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Ah Ci Ben Mio," composed by Guiseppe Verdi, performed by Franco Corelli, courtesy of Angel/EMI Classics, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"The Thrill Is Gone," written by Roy Hawkins and Rick Darnell, performed by B. B. King
"Mr. Hug-A-Bug," lyrics by Brent Maddock, music by Marc Shaiman, performed by Alfre Woodard, also performed by Wren T. Brown
"My Heart & Soul," written by Marc Shaiman, performed by Stephen Bishop, produced by Andrew Gold, arranged by Claude Gaudette.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Seven Souls
Release Date:
13 August 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles sneak preview: 31 July 1993
Los Angeles and New York opening: 13 August 1993
Production Date:
began 1 December 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 October 1993
Copyright Number:
PA665804
Physical Properties:
Sound
Digital DTS in selected theatres; Dolby Stereo® in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Eastman Color Film
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32586
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1959, four strangers board a bus on a rainy San Francisco, California, night: Harrison Winslow, a timid musical theater singer leaving a failed audition; Penny Washington, a single mother on her way to work as a telephone operator; Julia, an ambitious small-town waitress, chasing her boyfriend, John McBride, after first rejecting his marriage proposal; and Milo Peck, a petty thief caught attempting to retrieve and return a book of vintage postage stamps he stole from a child. Distracted by a woman in the adjacent traffic lane, Hal the bus driver swerves and narrowly misses an oncoming car carrying Frank and Eva Reilly, on their way to the hospital to have a baby. The bus crashes through a bridge railing and lands on the street below, killing everyone onboard. Eva delivers her child in the front seat of the Reilly car, and the souls of Harrison, Penny, Julia, and Milo ascend from the wreckage to watch over newborn boy, Thomas Reilly. As Thomas grows older, he befriends the four ghosts, who remain invisible to everyone but him. When his behavior rouses the suspicions of his teacher and a child welfare officer, the ghosts decide they will no longer interfere in Thomas’s life, and vanish from the crying boy’s bedroom. Thirty-four years later, the four souls watch, unseen, as Thomas becomes a calloused, hardworking liquidator unwilling to make a serious commitment to his girl friend, Anne. One day, the ghost of bus driver Hal appears to usher Harrison, Penny, Julia, and Milo to the afterlife. Apologizing for showing up late, Hal informs them they should have been controlling Thomas’s body to resolve conflicts in their former lives, and ... +


In 1959, four strangers board a bus on a rainy San Francisco, California, night: Harrison Winslow, a timid musical theater singer leaving a failed audition; Penny Washington, a single mother on her way to work as a telephone operator; Julia, an ambitious small-town waitress, chasing her boyfriend, John McBride, after first rejecting his marriage proposal; and Milo Peck, a petty thief caught attempting to retrieve and return a book of vintage postage stamps he stole from a child. Distracted by a woman in the adjacent traffic lane, Hal the bus driver swerves and narrowly misses an oncoming car carrying Frank and Eva Reilly, on their way to the hospital to have a baby. The bus crashes through a bridge railing and lands on the street below, killing everyone onboard. Eva delivers her child in the front seat of the Reilly car, and the souls of Harrison, Penny, Julia, and Milo ascend from the wreckage to watch over newborn boy, Thomas Reilly. As Thomas grows older, he befriends the four ghosts, who remain invisible to everyone but him. When his behavior rouses the suspicions of his teacher and a child welfare officer, the ghosts decide they will no longer interfere in Thomas’s life, and vanish from the crying boy’s bedroom. Thirty-four years later, the four souls watch, unseen, as Thomas becomes a calloused, hardworking liquidator unwilling to make a serious commitment to his girl friend, Anne. One day, the ghost of bus driver Hal appears to usher Harrison, Penny, Julia, and Milo to the afterlife. Apologizing for showing up late, Hal informs them they should have been controlling Thomas’s body to resolve conflicts in their former lives, and they convince Hal to give them more brief time on Earth. Milo frightens Thomas Reilly by suddenly rematerializing inside his car and causing a crash that sends Thomas to the hospital. Thomas explains that after the disappearance of his four invisible friends, he convinced himself they were only figments of his imagination. Doubting his sanity once again, Thomas initially refuses to help the ghosts fulfill their tasks, but later relents when Milo and Julia possess him and sabotage an important business meeting. Later, Thomas allows Milo to inhabit his body in order to retrieve the stolen postage stamps and return them to the wronged boy, who is now a grown father. Once the deed is completed, Hal appears and insists Milo accompany him to the afterlife. Next, Thomas learns that Penny’s two orphaned daughters were sent to foster homes in Sacramento, California, while her son’s whereabouts remain unknown. Deciding the trip is too far to drive, Penny jumps into Thomas’s body and sneaks backstage at a sold-out concert for blues musician B. B. King. Before the show, she encourages Harrison to follow his dream and perform the national anthem onstage. As Harrison hesitantly begins to sing with Thomas’s voice, B. B. King joins in on his guitar, and the crowd bursts into applause. Harrison thanks Thomas for believing in him, and boards Hal’s bus as it rolls across the stage. Afterward, Thomas is arrested for his disorderly conduct, but released on bail. Outside the police station, he runs into his girl friend Anne, who was at the concert with her parents. Bemoaning their stagnant relationship, Anne criticizes Thomas for lying in order to avoid meeting her family. Leaving the parking lot, Thomas crashes into the car of kindly police officer Sergeant William “Billy” Barclay. Billy sings a lullaby to his frightened daughter. Penny’s ghost recognizes the tune as a song she used to sing her son. Making the connection, Thomas tells Billy that his long-lost sisters now live in Sacramento, and Penny excitedly uses Thomas’s arms to hug her son before boarding Hal’s bus and driving away. With only Julia remaining, Thomas goes to her boyfriend John McBride’s farmhouse to help Julia write and deliver a letter of heartfelt apology. An increasingly impatient Hal appears, allowing them only a few extra minutes to complete the task. At the door, Thomas speaks with the new owner of the farmhouse, who reveals that John died several years earlier. Although the news infuriates Thomas, Julia realizes she can obtain closure by encouraging him to repair his relationship with Anne. She instructs him to tell Anne his true feelings and allow himself to experience the romance she never got to have. Reaching her hands toward Thomas’s face, she is shocked to discover she can touch him. They hug, and Julia boards the bus, which disappears into the distance. Back in the city, Thomas meets Anne, gives her the keys to his apartment, and confesses his love for her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.