Private Detective 62 (1933)

67 mins | Drama | 10 June 1933

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Cinematographer:

Tony Gaudio

Editor:

Harold McLernon

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's working titles were Private Detective and Man Killer. According to production records in the file on the film in the AMPAS library, the film was shot over twenty-one days at a cost of $260,000. Modern sources list Hal B. Wallis as supervisor. ...

More Less

The film's working titles were Private Detective and Man Killer. According to production records in the file on the film in the AMPAS library, the film was shot over twenty-one days at a cost of $260,000. Modern sources list Hal B. Wallis as supervisor.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
8 Jul 1933
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1933
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
7 Jul 1933
p. 14
Motion Picture Herald
15 Jul 1933
p. 70
New York Times
7 Jul 1933
p. 20
Variety
11 Jul 1933
p. 15
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Man Killer
Private Detective
Release Date:
10 June 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
20 July 1933
LP4021
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In France, United States State Department employee Donald Free is caught trying to steal French state papers and is deported. Because of the publicity, Donald is released from his government job and has a hard time finding another because jobs are scarce during the Depression. One day, he walks into the Peerless Detective Agency, run by the incompetent and crooked Dan Hogan. Hogan does not have customers and Donald does not have a license, so Donald proposes a partnership. Hogan fails to complete his first assignment and starts a dog stealing racket to bring in money. Then, without Donald's knowledge, Hogan connects with gangster Tony Bandor and business booms. Bandor complains that a society woman, Janet Reynolds, is winning too much at his gambling tables and hires Hogan to find some scandal he can use to prevent her from collecting her winnings. Hogan assigns Donald, without telling him the reason for his request. While keeping an eye on Janet, Donald falls in love with her. They begin seeing each other, but Donald is recognized as a private detective by a friend of Janet, who suggests that he is probably spying on her. After learning the truth about his assignment, Donald immediately quits the detective agency, and warns Hogan to stop harrassing Janet. Janet then informs Bandor that she wants to collect her winnings. To help Bandor, Hogan suggests that they make Janet think she has killed Bandor under suspicious conditions. Hogan then double-crosses Bandor by hiring a drug addict to shoot him after Janet leaves the apartment. She then hires the Peerless Agency to help her, and Donald personally takes her case. ...

More Less

In France, United States State Department employee Donald Free is caught trying to steal French state papers and is deported. Because of the publicity, Donald is released from his government job and has a hard time finding another because jobs are scarce during the Depression. One day, he walks into the Peerless Detective Agency, run by the incompetent and crooked Dan Hogan. Hogan does not have customers and Donald does not have a license, so Donald proposes a partnership. Hogan fails to complete his first assignment and starts a dog stealing racket to bring in money. Then, without Donald's knowledge, Hogan connects with gangster Tony Bandor and business booms. Bandor complains that a society woman, Janet Reynolds, is winning too much at his gambling tables and hires Hogan to find some scandal he can use to prevent her from collecting her winnings. Hogan assigns Donald, without telling him the reason for his request. While keeping an eye on Janet, Donald falls in love with her. They begin seeing each other, but Donald is recognized as a private detective by a friend of Janet, who suggests that he is probably spying on her. After learning the truth about his assignment, Donald immediately quits the detective agency, and warns Hogan to stop harrassing Janet. Janet then informs Bandor that she wants to collect her winnings. To help Bandor, Hogan suggests that they make Janet think she has killed Bandor under suspicious conditions. Hogan then double-crosses Bandor by hiring a drug addict to shoot him after Janet leaves the apartment. She then hires the Peerless Agency to help her, and Donald personally takes her case. He learns the identity of Bandor's actual killer and traces him back to Hogan. Meanwhile, Hogan tries to blackmail Janet. After Donald has Hogan arrested, he is offered his old job again. Finally, Janet proposes to Donald and he accepts.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

The working titles of the film were The Body Snatchers and They Came from Another World . According to a modern source, director Don Siegel ... >>

Star Wars

The film’s title card is preceded by the statement: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away....” Afterward, a prologue reads: “It is a period of ... >>

Duck Soup

The opening title card to the film reads "Paramount presents The Four Marx Brothers in Duck Soup." As noted by a May 1933 news ... >>

Highway 301

The film's working titles were The Tri-State Gang , Road Block , The One Million Dollar Bank Robbery , The Two Million Dollar Bank Robbery, ... >>

Love Story

The title, Love Story, appears at the beginning of the film. All other credits are presented at the end. The story begins with a voiceover by Ryan ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.