Made in America (1993)

PG-13 | 110 mins | Comedy, Romance | 28 May 1993

Full page view
HISTORY

       African music arrangements were done by Lebo Morake, who is credited onscreen as "Lebo M."
       On 13 May 1991, DV reported that filmmaker Blake Edwards was expected to direct Change of Heart, one of several recently-announced joint productions between Rick Bieber and Michael Douglas’s Stonebridge Entertainment and Moshe Diamant and Eduard Sarlui’s Epic Productions, collectively known as Stone Group Pictures. Edwards’s longtime partner Tony Adams was set to produce in association with Kalola Productions. Although a 25 May 1992 LAT news item named Kalola founder Carol Burnett as one of the film’s executive producers, only Marcia Brandwynne and Nadine Schiff, who also receive story credit, are listed as executive producers onscreen. The $15-20 million project was set to begin filming in Aug or Sep 1991, with domestic release through Columbia Pictures. A 6 Aug 1991 HR production chart stated that principal photography would take place in Southern California.
       The Jun 1993 issue of Venice magazine reported that the script was written for two white actors, but Whoopi Goldberg expressed interest in playing the role of “Sarah Mathews” after she received the script as a writing sample. Although director Richard Benjamin had previously read the screenplay, he did not agree to join the project until Stonebridge informed him of Goldberg’s involvement.
       HR production charts indicated that principal photography was delayed several times throughout the spring of 1992. A 26 May 1992 HR item listed a start date of 18 Apr 1992, by which point the filmmakers had decided to shoot on location in Oakland and Berkeley, CA. A 10 Jan 1992 Screen International ... More Less

       African music arrangements were done by Lebo Morake, who is credited onscreen as "Lebo M."
       On 13 May 1991, DV reported that filmmaker Blake Edwards was expected to direct Change of Heart, one of several recently-announced joint productions between Rick Bieber and Michael Douglas’s Stonebridge Entertainment and Moshe Diamant and Eduard Sarlui’s Epic Productions, collectively known as Stone Group Pictures. Edwards’s longtime partner Tony Adams was set to produce in association with Kalola Productions. Although a 25 May 1992 LAT news item named Kalola founder Carol Burnett as one of the film’s executive producers, only Marcia Brandwynne and Nadine Schiff, who also receive story credit, are listed as executive producers onscreen. The $15-20 million project was set to begin filming in Aug or Sep 1991, with domestic release through Columbia Pictures. A 6 Aug 1991 HR production chart stated that principal photography would take place in Southern California.
       The Jun 1993 issue of Venice magazine reported that the script was written for two white actors, but Whoopi Goldberg expressed interest in playing the role of “Sarah Mathews” after she received the script as a writing sample. Although director Richard Benjamin had previously read the screenplay, he did not agree to join the project until Stonebridge informed him of Goldberg’s involvement.
       HR production charts indicated that principal photography was delayed several times throughout the spring of 1992. A 26 May 1992 HR item listed a start date of 18 Apr 1992, by which point the filmmakers had decided to shoot on location in Oakland and Berkeley, CA. A 10 Jan 1992 Screen International brief reported that the working title had been changed to Everyday People, but that name did not appear in any other contemporary sources, and production got underway with the title, Made in America.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Berkeley’s H. Tulanian & Sons rug store stood in for Sarah’s bookshop, “African Queen.” A large portion of filming also took place in a 300-space Oakland parking lot at the corner of 14th and Madison Streets, where the crew spent six weeks building the “Jackson Motors” car dealership, a structure with ceilings high enough to accommodate camera and lighting equipment as if in a soundstage. At the nearby Lake Merritt Park, crew added a “lagoon-like swimming pool” along the water’s edge, due to restrictions against the elephant entering the natural lake and disrupting the ecosystem. The 19 May 1992 DV stated that principal photography lasted ten weeks.
       A 31 May 1993 LAT article reported that the premiere took place 27 May 1993 at the Bruin theater in Westwood, CA. $60,000 was raised for the Weizmann Institute of Science, located in producer Arnon Milchan’s hometown of Rehovot, Israel. The 23 Apr 1993 HR stated that the film opened 28 May 1993 in 2,000 theaters. A 3 Jun 1993 DV advertisement announced a box-office gross of $11,821,326 after the first four days of release.
       Two years later, the 26 May 1995 HR reported that screenwriter Kristi Kane filed a $1 million lawsuit against Milchan’s New Regency Productions, screenwriter Holly Goldberg Sloane, and agent Geoffrey Sanford. Kane alleged that Whoopi Goldberg had previously agreed to star in Scrambled Eggs, a similar script that was received by Milchan after she submitted it to the former Sanford Agency in 1990. The outcome of the case has not been determined.
      At the end of the film, cast credits briefly appear before returning to the final graduation scene in which “Tea Cake Walters” introduces a performance by the school choir. End credits state: "Animal action was monitored by The American Humane Association with on set supervision by the Oakland S.P.C.A. No animal was harmed in the making of this film"; "The Little Princess footage courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox, All rights reserved.,” and include thanks from producers to: “City of Oakland – Jeannie Rucker; City of Berkeley; University of California – Berkeley; Allen Temple Baptist Church Youth Choir: Betty Gadling, Minister of Music & Reverend Anthony Williams, Director; Williams Allums, Jr., Wayman Henry; Westinghouse Electric Corporation; Val Strough Company, Chevrolet – Ford – Lexus; Oakland Dodge; Signer Buick – Cadillac; Cochran & Celli Chevrolet; Marin Dodge; Dick Cepek Company.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 May 1991
p. 1, 6.
Daily Variety
19 May 1992.
---
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 1993
p. 5, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1995.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 May 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 May 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
31 May 1993.
---
New York Times
28 May 1993
Section C, p. 5.
Screen International
10 Jan 1992.
---
Variety
7 Jun 1993
p. 38.
Venice
Jun 1993
pp. 40-43.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Le Studio Canal+ Regency Enterprises Alcor Films Present
A Stonebridge Entertainment Kalola Productions, Inc. Arnon Milchan Production
A Richard Benjamin Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
2d grip
2d grip
Best boy elec
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam cam asst
Steadicam cam asst
Video consultant
Still photog
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Aerial unit dir of photog
Westcam tech
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Sketch artist
FILM EDITORS
Assoc film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dressing buyer
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Const coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Prop master
Asst props
2d asst props
Scenic charge
Standby painter
Sign writer
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Costumer to Ms. Goldberg
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv
Orch & arr by
African arr by
Copyist
Scoring eng
Mus contractor
Mus business affairs
Mus business affairs
Mus supv for Elektra Records
Mus supv for Elektra Records
Mus coord for Third Stone
Mus coord for Third Stone
Mus coord for Third Stone
Mus coord for Third Stone
Mus coord for Third Stone
SOUND
Boom op
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd processor
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals by
DANCE
In loving memory,
Choreog
Asst choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist to Mr. Danson
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Const accountant
Asst prod accountant
Post prod accountant
New Regency financial representative
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Post prod supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Casting assoc
Loc casting
Extras loc casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Palmer
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
Asst to Mr. Benjamin
Asst to Mr. Douglas
Asst to Mr. Douglas
1st asst to Mr. Milchan
Asst to Mr. Milchan
Asst to Mr. Reuther
Asst to Mr. Reuther
Asst to Ms. Schiff
Asst to Ms. Goldberg
Asst to Mr. Danson
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
L.A. prod asst
Ms. Goldberg management
Mr. Danson management
Transportation coord
Teamster capt
Driver for Mr. Benjamin
Driver for Ms. Goldberg
Driver for Mr. Danson
Projectionist
Helicopter pilot
Animals supplied by
Elephants owned and trained by
Elephants owned and trained by
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Orthopedic surgical consultant
Orthopedic surgical consultant
Promotions
ADR voice casting
Catering
For Stars Catering
Cook/Driver
Craft service
Chimp trained by
Chimp trained by, Goin' Ape
Chimp trained by, Goin' Ape
Loc projection systems
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
"Sarah," Stand-ins
"Hal," Stand-ins
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Go Away," written by Gloria M. Estefan and Lawrence Dermer, performed by Gloria Estefan, produced by Emilio Estefan, Jr., Jorge Casas, Clay Ostwald, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Dance Or Die," written by Will Smith, Jeff Townes, Victor E. Cooke, performed by DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince, produced by Victor E. Cooke, Jeff Townes, courtesy of Zomba Enterprises, Inc.
"The Colors Of Love," written by Carole Bayer Sager, James Ingram & Bruce Roberts, performed by Lisa Fischer, produced by David Foster, Lisa Fischer appears courtesy of Elektra Entertainment
+
SONGS
"Go Away," written by Gloria M. Estefan and Lawrence Dermer, performed by Gloria Estefan, produced by Emilio Estefan, Jr., Jorge Casas, Clay Ostwald, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Dance Or Die," written by Will Smith, Jeff Townes, Victor E. Cooke, performed by DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince, produced by Victor E. Cooke, Jeff Townes, courtesy of Zomba Enterprises, Inc.
"The Colors Of Love," written by Carole Bayer Sager, James Ingram & Bruce Roberts, performed by Lisa Fischer, produced by David Foster, Lisa Fischer appears courtesy of Elektra Entertainment
"Personality," written and performed by Greg Lawson
"Wild Thing," written by Chip Taylor, courtesy of EMI Blackwood Music Inc.
"Somewhere Over The Rainbow," written by E. Y. Harburg and Harold Arlen, performed by Judy Garland, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Voromby," written by Samoelo Andriammalalahanjaona, performed by Tarika Sammy with Henry Kaiser & David Lindley, courtesy of Shanachie Entertainment
"Ngoma Ra Mrongo (Taita, Kenya)," from the album Kenya & Tanzania/Witchcraft & Ritual Music, recorded by David Fanshawe, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Rebound," written and performed by Gen
"If You Need A Miracle," written by Eddie Cunningham and Dennis Knutson, performed by Ben E. King, produced by Nick Martinelli, courtesy of Ichiban Records
"Smoke On The Water," written by Ritchie Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Roger Glover, Jon Lord, and Ian Paice, performed by Deep Purple, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc./EMI Records UK, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, produced under license from EMI Records Limited, by arrangement with EMI Records Ltd.
"Does He Do It Good," written by Keith Sweat & Roy Murray, performed by Keith Sweat & Silk, produced by Keith Sweat, Keith Sweat & Silk appear courtesy of Elektra Entertainment
"I Know I Don't Walk On Water," written by Laura Satterfield/Ira Walker, performed by Laura Satterfield & Ephraim Lewis, produced by Peter Asher, Laura Satterfield appears courtesy of Third Stone Records/Atlantic Recording Corp., Ephraim Lewis appears courtesy of Elektra Entertainment
"M-O-T-H-E-R (A Word That Means The World To Me)," written by Howard Johnson and Theodore Morse
"Mysterious Island," written by Mickey Hart, Airto Moreira, Laura Purim & Jeff Sterling, performed by Mickey Hart/Planet Drum, courtesy of RYKODISC
"Pomp And Circumstance," written by Sir Edward Elgar
"What Is This?," written by Carmen Alice, performed by Sergio Mendes, courtesy of Elektra Entertainment, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Stand," written by Sylvester Stewart, performed by YT Style, produced by Paul Wright III, courtesy of Third Stone Records/Atlantic Recording Corp., additional rap written by YT Style: Antoine Foote, Gregory Fields, Jeffrey Russell, & Meashell Mc Cann
"The Good The Bad The Ugly," written by Ennio Morricone
"Made In America," written by Del, Kwame and Domino Dee, performed by Del Thafunkee Homosapien, produced by Kwame and Domino Dee, courtesy of Street Knowledge Inc.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Change of Heart
Everyday People
Release Date:
28 May 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 27 May 1993
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 May 1993
Production Date:
began 18 April 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Regency Enterprises, VOF & Studio Canal+
Copyright Date:
27 August 1993
Copyright Number:
PA625506
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording® Dolby Stereo SR in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Countries:
France, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32162
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As the owner of an African bookstore, widow Sarah Mathews lives comfortably in Oakland, California, with her teenage daughter, Zora. One day in biology class, Zora pricks her finger for a blood sample and realizes her blood type differs from those of her mother and late father. When confronted, Sarah confesses she conceived Zora using sperm from an anonymous donor after her husband died. Determined to find her biological father, Zora goes to the clinic and hacks into the office computer database while her best friend, “Tea Cake” Walters, reluctantly distracts the receptionist by pretending to be a potential donor. After finding her mother’s file, Zora visits the home of donor Halbert “Hal” Jackson, who turns out to be a white automobile salesman. Late for work, Hal offers to drive her to his dealership, Jackson Motors, where he dons a gaudy, gold-fringed cowboy suit to film a television commercial featuring a live bear. Once Zora reveals her identity, Hal breaks his concentration and is subsequently mauled by the bear. The salesman is appalled that Zora invaded his privacy and claims he has nothing to offer her, causing the girl to leave in tears. That night, Zora makes dinner for her mother and tells her about Hal. The news shocks Sarah, who specifically requested a black donor. When the clinic fails to acknowledge the error, Sarah visits Hal’s dealership and confronts him for rudely dismissing Zora the previous day. Moments later, Zora barges in, and Hal watches as the two women become consumed in an argument about whether Zora should attend the University of California, Berkeley or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After accepting several drinks from Hal, Sarah ... +


As the owner of an African bookstore, widow Sarah Mathews lives comfortably in Oakland, California, with her teenage daughter, Zora. One day in biology class, Zora pricks her finger for a blood sample and realizes her blood type differs from those of her mother and late father. When confronted, Sarah confesses she conceived Zora using sperm from an anonymous donor after her husband died. Determined to find her biological father, Zora goes to the clinic and hacks into the office computer database while her best friend, “Tea Cake” Walters, reluctantly distracts the receptionist by pretending to be a potential donor. After finding her mother’s file, Zora visits the home of donor Halbert “Hal” Jackson, who turns out to be a white automobile salesman. Late for work, Hal offers to drive her to his dealership, Jackson Motors, where he dons a gaudy, gold-fringed cowboy suit to film a television commercial featuring a live bear. Once Zora reveals her identity, Hal breaks his concentration and is subsequently mauled by the bear. The salesman is appalled that Zora invaded his privacy and claims he has nothing to offer her, causing the girl to leave in tears. That night, Zora makes dinner for her mother and tells her about Hal. The news shocks Sarah, who specifically requested a black donor. When the clinic fails to acknowledge the error, Sarah visits Hal’s dealership and confronts him for rudely dismissing Zora the previous day. Moments later, Zora barges in, and Hal watches as the two women become consumed in an argument about whether Zora should attend the University of California, Berkeley or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After accepting several drinks from Hal, Sarah fervently attempts to deny his paternity, but is forced to accept the truth when she realizes he and Zora share the same habit of loudly cracking their knuckles. Hal apologizes for hurting Zora’s feelings and drives Sarah back to her store after she struggles to ride her bicycle. While using the bathroom, Hal finds a photograph of Sarah’s former husband, and the two share a moment of connection reflecting on their previous failed relationships. That night, Hal watches The Little Princess on television and finds himself proudly thinking of Zora and her academic accomplishments. Zora returns to Jackson’s Motors to watch Hal shoot another commercial riding on the back of an elephant. When Sarah arrives to retrieve her daughter, the animal chases after her, drawn to the sound of her bicycle bell. The pursuit concludes at a nearby marina, and Hal falls into the water. Although concerned that the incident will hurt his business, he later discovers hundreds of customers gathered outside his dealership, and sells every car on the lot. At closing time, Hal realizes he has no one to celebrate with, and stops by the Mathews’ house bearing gifts: a bicycle helmet for Sarah and a book of maps for Zora, which contains a sentimental inscription. As Sarah walks Hal back to his car, the dealer’s mechanic, Diego, arrives to take Zora on a date. Now alone with Sarah, Hal awkwardly invites her to join him for dinner. At a sushi restaurant, Hal is unfamiliar with the dishes and unknowingly consumes a gob of spicy wasabi, which amuses Sarah. On the walk back to her house, Sarah becomes more receptive to Hal’s seduction, and they clumsily move to her bedroom to make love. Just then, however, Zora returns home, eager to get away from Diego after he tried to pressure her into having sex. Hal and Sarah scramble to compose themselves, but Zora notices the house in disarray and chides her mother for jeopardizing the father-daughter relationship between herself and Hal. In the morning, Hal realizes he is dissatisfied with his slovenly lifestyle and unhappy with his ditzy, live-in girl friend, Stacy. He returns to work and is delighted to see Sarah waiting in his office. Due to Zora’s unhappiness, she suggests they end their courtship, but Hal accuses her of being afraid to part with the memory of her former husband. Sarah leaves in a rage, and collides with a car when she rides her bicycle into traffic. Several hours later, Zora and Hal hear of her accident and find she has been hospitalized with a concussion and severe leg wound. When Sarah revives the next morning, Hal kisses her before returning home to change clothes. There, Stacy announces she is leaving him for another man, and Hal is secretly relieved. Back at the hospital, Zora reveals she has won a prestigious science award that will fund her college tuition. When Sarah openly acknowledges Hal as Zora’s father, he reveals that after giving a blood donation for Sarah’s leg operation, he learned that his rare blood type makes his relation to Zora genetically impossible. A clerical error was responsible for the clinic’s incorrect file, and the real donor was likely a member of the science department at Berkeley. When Zora excuses herself from the room, Sarah thanks Hal for looking out for her. Returning home, Zora embraces Tea Cake and admits she is disappointed because she had come to accept Hal as her father. On graduation day, Zora plans to attend MIT and dedicates her award to her mother. As Sarah hobbles toward the stage with her cane, Hal pushes his way to the front of the crowd and escorts her up the stairs. Zora introduces them as her parents, and the crowd cheers as Sarah, Hal, Zora, and the other graduates dance to a performance by the school choir. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.