Point of No Return (1993)

R | 108 mins | Drama | 19 March 1993

Producer:

Art Linson

Cinematographer:

Michael Watkins

Editor:

Frank Morriss

Production Designer:

Philip Harrison

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

Although not credited onscreen, the film contains footage from Mr. Skeffington (1944, see entry).
       According to articles in the 7 Jun 1991 HR and 9 Sep 1991 Var, French director Luc Besson had been commissioned to write an English-language remake of his 1990 French-Italian film, Nikita, which had earned nearly $5 million at the U.S. box-office. Although Besson and a team of American writers completed a first draft of the script, Besson and Warner Bros. did not agree on a directing deal, stalling development until John Badham joined the project later that year. Despite his contributions, Besson does not receive onscreen writing credit. Julia Roberts was reportedly interested in the leading role, and the 2 Dec 1991 DV and 31 Jan 1992 Screen International named Kim Basinger and Demi Moore among those rumored to star. Bridget Fonda was ultimately cast, and the 2 Mar 1992 DV suggested that Luke Perry was considered to play "J. P." A 3 Mar 1992 HR production chart indicated that filming was scheduled to begin 23 Mar 1993.
       The 31 Mar 1992 HR stated that principal photography began a week late, on 30 Mar 1992, with locations in Los Angeles, CA; New Orleans, LA; and Washington, D.C. Production notes in AMPAS library files claim that Point of No Return was the first motion picture shot on the new Kodak 5296 film stock, which allowed production to work in low-light conditions.
       Working titles included La Femme Nikita and Untitled/Nikita. A 14 Dec 1992 Var news item stated ... More Less

Although not credited onscreen, the film contains footage from Mr. Skeffington (1944, see entry).
       According to articles in the 7 Jun 1991 HR and 9 Sep 1991 Var, French director Luc Besson had been commissioned to write an English-language remake of his 1990 French-Italian film, Nikita, which had earned nearly $5 million at the U.S. box-office. Although Besson and a team of American writers completed a first draft of the script, Besson and Warner Bros. did not agree on a directing deal, stalling development until John Badham joined the project later that year. Despite his contributions, Besson does not receive onscreen writing credit. Julia Roberts was reportedly interested in the leading role, and the 2 Dec 1991 DV and 31 Jan 1992 Screen International named Kim Basinger and Demi Moore among those rumored to star. Bridget Fonda was ultimately cast, and the 2 Mar 1992 DV suggested that Luke Perry was considered to play "J. P." A 3 Mar 1992 HR production chart indicated that filming was scheduled to begin 23 Mar 1993.
       The 31 Mar 1992 HR stated that principal photography began a week late, on 30 Mar 1992, with locations in Los Angeles, CA; New Orleans, LA; and Washington, D.C. Production notes in AMPAS library files claim that Point of No Return was the first motion picture shot on the new Kodak 5296 film stock, which allowed production to work in low-light conditions.
       Working titles included La Femme Nikita and Untitled/Nikita. A 14 Dec 1992 Var news item stated that filmmakers also considered calling the film The Specialist, using the title of another Warner Bros. property written by screenwriter Alexandra Seros. However, the Nikita project was renamed Point of No Return, and The Specialist (see entry) retained its title for release in 1994.
       LAT critic Kenneth Turan called Point of No Return a “scene-by-scene remake” of its source material, and reviews were largely negative. A 24 Mar 1993 DV advertisement listed a three-day box-office gross of $7,160,389. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1991.
---
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 1993
p. 6, 14.
Los Angeles Times
19 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
19 Mar 1993
Section C, p. 10.
Screen International
31 Jan 1992.
---
Variety
9 Sep 1991.
---
Variety
2 Mar 1992.
---
Variety
14 Dec 1992.
---
Variety
22 Mar 1993
p. 50.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
An Art Linson Production
A John Badham Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Still photog
Video asst
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
Gen foreman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Weapons specialist
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Stand-by painter
Head greensman
Set des
Set des
Set des
Prop master, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Key costumer
Men's ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Addl mus score by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Makeup artist Ms. Fonda
Makeup artist
Hairstylist Ms. Fonda
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod assoc
Exec asst to Mr. Badham
Asst to Ms. Fonda
Asst to Mr. Byrne
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Asst prod secy
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Craft service
First aid
Tech adv (Police)
Tech adv (Medical)
Computer systems coord
Macintosh 24 frame sync
Macintosh 24 frame sync
Casting assoc
Scr supv, 2d unit
Transportation capt, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the French film Nikita written by Luc Besson (Gaumont, 1990).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Wild Is The Wind," written by Ned Washington and Dimitri Tiomkin, performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Want A Little Sugar In My Bowl," written and performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of EMG Music
"Everglade," written by Jennifer Finch and Daniel Ray, performed by L7, courtesy of Slash Records
+
SONGS
"Wild Is The Wind," written by Ned Washington and Dimitri Tiomkin, performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Want A Little Sugar In My Bowl," written and performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of EMG Music
"Everglade," written by Jennifer Finch and Daniel Ray, performed by L7, courtesy of Slash Records
"Feeling Good," written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Here Comes The Sun," written by George Harrison, performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of RCA Records Label of EMG Music
"Black Is The Color Of My True Love's Hair," arranged and performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Cuando Calienta El Sol," written by Carlos Rigual, Mario Rigual and Carlos Alberto Martinoli, performed by Vikki Carr, courtesy of EMI Records Group/EMI Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Zydeco Boogaloo," written by Stanley Dural Jr., performed by Buckwheat Zydeco, courtesy of Rounder Record Corp.
"Co-Fet?," written and performed by John Delafose, courtesy of Arhoolie Productions, Inc.
"Happy Birthday To You," written by Patty S. Hill and Mildred J. Hill
"Entertainment City," written and performed by Harry Perry.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Specialist
La Femme Nikita
Untitled/Nikita
Release Date:
19 March 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 19 March 1993
Production Date:
began 30 March 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP
Copyright Date:
27 May 1993
Copyright Number:
PA618004
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32163
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Washington, D.C., drug addict Margaret “Maggie” Hayward is condemned to die for killing a police officer while attempting to rob a pharmacy. During the sentencing, Maggie punches the security guards and climbs over the tables in an effort to escape, and the outburst is witnessed by a mysterious figure seated in the gallery. Shortly after she is executed by lethal injection, Maggie awakens in a white room. The man from the courtroom introduces himself as Bob, a government agent who faked her death in order to offer her a “second chance” at life as an undercover assassin. Quickly realizing she has no choice, Maggie begins her training regimen, which includes lessons in computers, martial arts, and etiquette. Despite her restlessness and difficult behavior, Maggie consistently receives high test scores. Having grown attracted to Maggie, Bob convinces Kaufman, the program director, to expedite her training. Six months later, Maggie has transformed into a beautiful and sophisticated woman. As reward for her efforts, Bob takes her out for an elegant dinner. Shortly after their arrival at the restaurant, he gives Maggie a large, loaded handgun and informs her that she must kill two diners sitting in the upstairs lounge. Once he excuses himself from the table, Maggie swiftly runs upstairs, shoots the targets, and flees to the men’s restroom. Unable to escape through the window as Bob instructed, Maggie runs through the kitchen, killing several of her targets’ bodyguards. Back at the training facility, Bob reveals she passed her final test, and will soon receive her first official assignment. He kisses her, but Maggie warns that she will never allow him to do it again. The next morning, Maggie assumes ... +


In Washington, D.C., drug addict Margaret “Maggie” Hayward is condemned to die for killing a police officer while attempting to rob a pharmacy. During the sentencing, Maggie punches the security guards and climbs over the tables in an effort to escape, and the outburst is witnessed by a mysterious figure seated in the gallery. Shortly after she is executed by lethal injection, Maggie awakens in a white room. The man from the courtroom introduces himself as Bob, a government agent who faked her death in order to offer her a “second chance” at life as an undercover assassin. Quickly realizing she has no choice, Maggie begins her training regimen, which includes lessons in computers, martial arts, and etiquette. Despite her restlessness and difficult behavior, Maggie consistently receives high test scores. Having grown attracted to Maggie, Bob convinces Kaufman, the program director, to expedite her training. Six months later, Maggie has transformed into a beautiful and sophisticated woman. As reward for her efforts, Bob takes her out for an elegant dinner. Shortly after their arrival at the restaurant, he gives Maggie a large, loaded handgun and informs her that she must kill two diners sitting in the upstairs lounge. Once he excuses himself from the table, Maggie swiftly runs upstairs, shoots the targets, and flees to the men’s restroom. Unable to escape through the window as Bob instructed, Maggie runs through the kitchen, killing several of her targets’ bodyguards. Back at the training facility, Bob reveals she passed her final test, and will soon receive her first official assignment. He kisses her, but Maggie warns that she will never allow him to do it again. The next morning, Maggie assumes the identity of “Claudia Dorne,” a computer expert from Chicago, Illinois, and Bob gives her the codename “Nina,” after her favorite singer, Nina Simone. As “Claudia,” Maggie moves to Venice, California, and takes up residence in a beachfront apartment. There, she begins a romantic relationship with building manager, J. P. After four months together, J. P. notices that “Claudia” remains guarded about her past. One day, Maggie receives instructions for an assignment at a hotel across town. Disguised as a maid, she delivers a bomb to a VIP guest and promptly returns home, where she runs into Bob. He insists on meeting J. P. for security reasons, and Maggie reluctantly invites him to dinner as her “uncle.” J. P. annoys her by prying Bob for personal information about his niece, but Bob diffuses the tension by telling an elaborate story about her childhood. Masquerading as a travel agent, Bob offers them two tickets to attend Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Louisiana, where Maggie must carry out her next job. During a parade, Maggie instinctively beats up two muggers in an alleyway and shocks J. P. with her skills. Back at the hotel, Maggie receives a telephone call informing her of a sniper weapon hidden in the bathroom cabinet. Pretending to take a bath, Maggie locks herself in the bathroom, assembles the gun, and waits at the window. As she takes aim, J. P. suggests they get married, and becomes frustrated when she does not answer. After prolonged hesitation, Maggie shoots her target and hides the gun in the bathtub moments before J. P. unlocks the door. She tearfully apologizes for remaining so secretive, but promises she has sufficient reason. During a stopover in Washington, D.C., Maggie tells Bob she wants to quit her job and begs him to find her a way out. He initially denies her request, and assigns her to investigate Fahd Bahktiar, a wealthy Iranian man who has been peddling nuclear information in the Middle East. Maggie asks her former instructor and confidante, Amanda, if agents ever escape the program. Amanda admits she never considered the possibility, and Maggie throws the Bahktiar file in the trash. Bob follows her back to California, promising to help her if she successfully completes her final task. Aided by her partner, Beth, Maggie poses as a manicurist and administers a sedative that knocks Bahktiar’s girl friend, Angela, unconscious. However, the mission goes awry when Beth gets shot in the scuffle and kills Angela’s two bodyguards. Beth panics and calls director Kaufman, who sends a “cleaner” named Victor to dispose of the bodies. Although she is not dead, Victor includes Angela among the corpses and uses acid to dissolve their remains before killing Beth, who suffers another panic attack. Afterward, Maggie enters Bahktiar’s house dressed as Angela and breaks into his computer system. Once she retrieves the files, Maggie returns to Victor’s getaway car. As they speed away, Maggie realizes Victor has been instructed to kill her and she grabs the steering wheel, crashing the car. Victor becomes wedged under the wrecked automobile, which rolls over the side of a cliff and sends him tumbling to his death. Surviving with only minor injuries, Maggie sneaks back to her apartment and climbs into bed with J. P. The next morning, she disappears without her belongings, but leaves behind Bahktiar’s computer disc and a note for Bob. Believing she does not want to be found, J. P. tears up the note and warns Bob to leave her alone. Lamenting his lost love, Bob takes one of Maggie’s Nina Simone records and returns to his car. Although he notices Maggie watching him from across the misty boardwalk, he telephones Kaufman and reports that she died in the car accident. +

In Washington, D.C. drug addict Margaret “Maggie” Hayward is condemned to die for killing a police officer while attempting to rob a pharmacy. During the sentencing, Maggie punches the security guards and climbs over the tables in an effort to escape, and the outburst is witnessed by a mysterious figure seated in the gallery. Shortly after she is executed by lethal injection, Maggie awakens in a white room. The man from the courtroom introduces himself as Bob, a government agent who faked her death in order to offer her a “second chance” at life as an undercover assassin. Quickly realizing she has no choice, Maggie begins her training regimen, which includes lessons in computers, martial arts, and etiquette. Despite her restlessness and difficult behavior, Maggie consistently receives high test scores. Having grown attracted to Maggie, Bob convinces Kaufman, the program director, to expedite her training. Six months later, Maggie has transformed into a beautiful and sophisticated woman. As reward for her efforts, Bob takes her out for an elegant dinner. Shortly after their arrival at the restaurant, he gives Maggie a large, loaded handgun and informs her that she must kill two diners sitting in the upstairs lounge. Once he excuses himself from the table, Maggie swiftly runs upstairs, shoots the targets, and flees to the men’s restroom. Unable to escape through the window as Bob instructed, Maggie runs through the kitchen, killing several of her targets’ bodyguards. Back at the training facility, Bob reveals she passed her final test, and will soon receive her first official assignment. He kisses her, but Maggie warns that she will never allow him to do it again. The next morning, Maggie assumes the identity of “Claudia Dorne,” a computer expert from Chicago, Illinois, and Bob gives her the codename “Nina,” after her favorite singer, Nina Simone. As “Claudia,” Maggie moves to Venice, California, and signs a lease for a beachfront apartment. There, she begins a romantic relationship with building manager, J. P. After four months together, J. P. notices that “Claudia” remains guarded about her past. One day, Maggie receives instructions for an assignment at a hotel across town. Disguised as a maid, she delivers a bomb to a VIP guest and promptly returns home, where she runs into Bob. He insists on meeting J. P. for security reasons, and Maggie reluctantly invites him to dinner as her “uncle.” J. P. annoys her by prying Bob for personal information about his niece, but Bob diffuses the tension by telling an elaborate story about her childhood. Masquerading as a travel agent, Bob offers them two tickets to attend Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Louisiana, where Maggie must carry out her next job. During a parade, Maggie instinctively beats up two muggers in an alleyway and shocks J. P. with her skills. Back at the hotel, Maggie receives a telephone call informing her of a sniper weapon hidden in the bathroom cabinet. Pretending to take a bath, Maggie locks herself in the bathroom, assembles the gun, and waits at the window. As she takes aim, J. P. suggests they get married, and becomes frustrated when she does not answer. After prolonged hesitation, Maggie shoots her target and hides the gun in the bathtub moments before J. P. unlocks the door. She tearfully apologizes for remaining so secretive, but promises she has sufficient reason. During a stopover in Washington, D.C., Maggie tells Bob she wants to quit her job and begs him to find her a way out. He initially denies her request, and assigns her to investigate Fahd Bahktiar, a wealthy Iranian man who has been peddling nuclear information in the Middle East. Maggie asks her former instructor and confidante, Amanda, if agents ever escape the program. Amanda admits she never considered the possibility, and Maggie throws the Bahktiar file in the trash. Bob follows her back to California, promising to help her if she successfully completes her final task. Aided by her partner, Beth, Maggie poses as a manicurist and administers a sedative that knocks Bahktir’s girl friend, Angela, unconscious. However, the mission goes awry when Beth gets shot in the scuffle and kills Angela’s two bodyguards. Beth panics and calls director Kaufman, who sends a “cleaner” named Victor to dispose of the bodies. Although she is not dead, Victor includes Angela among the corpses and uses acid to dissolve their remains before killing Beth, who suffers another panic attack. Afterward, Maggie enters Bahktiar’s house dressed as Angela and breaks into his computer system. Once she retrieves the files, Maggie returns to Victor’s getaway car. As they speed away, Maggie realizes Victor has been instructed to kill her and grabs the steering wheel, crashing the car. Victor becomes wedged under the wrecked automobile, which rolls over the side of a cliff and sends him tumbling to his death. Surviving with only minor injuries, Maggie sneaks back to her apartment and climbs into bed with J. P. The next morning, she disappears without her belongings, but leaves behind Bahktiar’s floppy disc and a note for Bob. Believing she does not want to be found, J. P. tears up the note and warns Bob to leave her alone. Lamenting his lost love, Bob takes one of Maggie’s Nina Simone records and returns to his car. Although he notices Maggie watching him from across the misty boardwalk, he telephones Kaufman and reports that she died in the car accident. +

In Washington, D.C. drug addict Margaret “Maggie” Hayward is condemned to die for killing a police officer while attempting to rob a pharmacy. During the sentencing, Maggie punches the security guards and climbs over the tables in an effort to escape, and the outburst is witnessed by a mysterious figure seated in the gallery. Shortly after she is executed by lethal injection, Maggie awakens in a white room. The man from the courtroom introduces himself as Bob, a government agent who faked her death in order to offer her a “second chance” at life as an undercover assassin. Quickly realizing she has no choice, Maggie begins her training regimen, which includes lessons in computers, martial arts, and etiquette. Despite her restlessness and difficult behavior, Maggie consistently receives high test scores. Having grown attracted to Maggie, Bob convinces Kaufman, the program director, to expedite her training. Six months later, Maggie has transformed into a beautiful and sophisticated woman. As reward for her efforts, Bob takes her out for an elegant dinner. Shortly after their arrival at the restaurant, he gives Maggie a large, loaded handgun and informs her that she must kill two diners sitting in the upstairs lounge. Once he excuses himself from the table, Maggie swiftly runs upstairs, shoots the targets, and flees to the men’s restroom. Unable to escape through the window as Bob instructed, Maggie runs through the kitchen, killing several of her targets’ bodyguards. Back at the training facility, Bob reveals she passed her final test, and will soon receive her first official assignment. He kisses her, but Maggie warns that she will never allow him to do it again. The next morning, Maggie assumes the identity of “Claudia Dorne,” a computer expert from Chicago, Illinois, and Bob gives her the codename “Nina,” after her favorite singer, Nina Simone. As “Claudia,” Maggie moves to Venice, California, and signs a lease for a beachfront apartment. There, she begins a romantic relationship with building manager, J. P. After four months together, J. P. notices that “Claudia” remains guarded about her past. One day, Maggie receives instructions for an assignment at a hotel across town. Disguised as a maid, she delivers a bomb to a VIP guest and promptly returns home, where she runs into Bob. He insists on meeting J. P. for security reasons, and Maggie reluctantly invites him to dinner as her “uncle.” J. P. annoys her by prying Bob for personal information about his niece, but Bob diffuses the tension by telling an elaborate story about her childhood. Masquerading as a travel agent, Bob offers them two tickets to attend Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Louisiana, where Maggie must carry out her next job. During a parade, Maggie instinctively beats up two muggers in an alleyway and shocks J. P. with her skills. Back at the hotel, Maggie receives a telephone call informing her of a sniper weapon hidden in the bathroom cabinet. Pretending to take a bath, Maggie locks herself in the bathroom, assembles the gun, and waits at the window. As she takes aim, J. P. suggests they get married, and becomes frustrated when she does not answer. After prolonged hesitation, Maggie shoots her target and hides the gun in the bathtub moments before J. P. unlocks the door. She tearfully apologizes for remaining so secretive, but promises she has sufficient reason. During a stopover in Washington, D.C., Maggie tells Bob she wants to quit her job and begs him to find her a way out. He initially denies her request, and assigns her to investigate Fahd Bahktiar, a wealthy Iranian man who has been peddling nuclear information in the Middle East. Maggie asks her former instructor and confidante, Amanda, if agents ever escape the program. Amanda admits she never considered the possibility, and Maggie throws the Bahktiar file in the trash. Bob follows her back to California, promising to help her if she successfully completes her final task. Aided by her partner, Beth, Maggie poses as a manicurist and administers a sedative that knocks Bahktir’s girl friend, Angela, unconscious. However, the mission goes awry when Beth gets shot in the scuffle and kills Angela’s two bodyguards. Beth panics and calls director Kaufman, who sends a “cleaner” named Victor to dispose of the bodies. Although she is not dead, Victor includes Angela among the corpses and uses acid to dissolve their remains before killing Beth, who suffers another panic attack. Afterward, Maggie enters Bahktiar’s house dressed as Angela and breaks into his computer system. Once she retrieves the files, Maggie returns to Victor’s getaway car. As they speed away, Maggie realizes Victor has been instructed to kill her and grabs the steering wheel, crashing the car. Victor becomes wedged under the wrecked automobile, which rolls over the side of a cliff and sends him tumbling to his death. Surviving with only minor injuries, Maggie sneaks back to her apartment and climbs into bed with J. P. The next morning, she disappears without her belongings, but leaves behind Bahktiar’s floppy disc and a note for Bob. Believing she does not want to be found, J. P. tears up the note and warns Bob to leave her alone. Lamenting his lost love, Bob takes one of Maggie’s Nina Simone records and returns to his car. Although he notices Maggie watching him from across the misty boardwalk, he telephones Kaufman and reports that she died in the car accident. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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