The Three Musketeers (1993)

PG | 105 mins | Adventure, Romance | 12 November 1993

Director:

Stephen Herek

Writer:

David Loughery

Producers:

Joe Roth, Roger Birnbaum

Cinematographer:

Dean Semler

Editor:

John F. Link

Production Designer:

Wolf Kroeger

Production Companies:

Walt Disney Pictures , Caravan Pictures, Vienna Film Financing Fund
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HISTORY

       The 22 May 1992 HR announced Walt Disney Pictures and Columbia Pictures/Vision International simultaneously began development on two separate adaptations of Alexandre Dumas’s 1844 novel, The Three Musketeers. A 24 Nov 1992 DV article stated that Disney paid $650,000 for a screenplay by David Loughery, who had previously been considered for the rival project by Columbia producer Brad Wyman. As a result, Wyman sent Disney a letter claiming that Loughery’s script contained concepts that were considered the property of Columbia, but the matter was reportedly settled. Around this time, yet another “Three Musketeers” project went into development at TriStar Pictures with director Jeremiah Chechik and a screenplay by Joel Gross, which DV described as a “sophisticated and faithful adaptation of the Dumas classic” that contrasted with Disney’s younger, more “hip” version of the story.
       On 7 Jan 1993, DV reported that Cinergi Productions, which was signed on to produce the Disney film, dropped out because company owner Andrew Vajna disagreed with many of the studio’s casting and scheduling decisions. Jordan Kerner and Jon Avnet were brought on as replacements following their success on Disney’s The Mighty Ducks (1992, see entry). However, the duo quickly stepped down to the position of executive producers in order to produce When a Man Loves a Woman (1994, see entry) for Touchstone Pictures. President David Hoberman then hired Joe Roth and Roger Birnbaum of Caravan Pictures, explaining that “the casting of producers would be better if they were switched,” since Roth and Birnbaum had previously bid on Loughery’s The Three Musketeers property when they worked at ... More Less

       The 22 May 1992 HR announced Walt Disney Pictures and Columbia Pictures/Vision International simultaneously began development on two separate adaptations of Alexandre Dumas’s 1844 novel, The Three Musketeers. A 24 Nov 1992 DV article stated that Disney paid $650,000 for a screenplay by David Loughery, who had previously been considered for the rival project by Columbia producer Brad Wyman. As a result, Wyman sent Disney a letter claiming that Loughery’s script contained concepts that were considered the property of Columbia, but the matter was reportedly settled. Around this time, yet another “Three Musketeers” project went into development at TriStar Pictures with director Jeremiah Chechik and a screenplay by Joel Gross, which DV described as a “sophisticated and faithful adaptation of the Dumas classic” that contrasted with Disney’s younger, more “hip” version of the story.
       On 7 Jan 1993, DV reported that Cinergi Productions, which was signed on to produce the Disney film, dropped out because company owner Andrew Vajna disagreed with many of the studio’s casting and scheduling decisions. Jordan Kerner and Jon Avnet were brought on as replacements following their success on Disney’s The Mighty Ducks (1992, see entry). However, the duo quickly stepped down to the position of executive producers in order to produce When a Man Loves a Woman (1994, see entry) for Touchstone Pictures. President David Hoberman then hired Joe Roth and Roger Birnbaum of Caravan Pictures, explaining that “the casting of producers would be better if they were switched,” since Roth and Birnbaum had previously bid on Loughery’s The Three Musketeers property when they worked at Twentieth Century Fox.
       With production teams underway, the three rival studios each raced to be the first to begin casting. The 18 Jan 1993 Var indicated Brad Pitt turned down an offer to star in the Disney film, while the 22 Jan 1993 Screen International stated that the role of “D’Argatnan” was originally offered to Brendan Fraser. Gary Oldman was also reportedly attached, with Robert Downey, Jr., William Baldwin , and Kiefer Sutherland in consideration for supporting roles at both Disney and TriStar. A 21 Jan 1993 DV article announced that Disney surged ahead of its competitors as the studio entered into final negotiations with Chris O’Donnell, Kiefer Sutherland, and Charlie Sheen. According to a news item in the 15 Mar 1993 issue of People magazine, Sheen and Sutherland earned $3.5 million and $1.75 million, respectively, while Oliver Platt negotiated a “low six-figure fee” and O’Donnell received $500,000. The TriStar and Columbia projects never went into production.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmakers opted against shooting in the story’s actual setting of Paris, France, due to the dearth of period-appropriate structures that had survived World War II. Although the Barrandov Studios in Prague, Czech Republic, was initially selected as the picture’s base of operations, the 26 Mar 1993 Screen International announced production would relocate to Vienna, Austria, after the Vienna Film Financing Fund offered $2 million to film entirely on location in Austria. Following a brief delay, an 11 May 1993 HR production chart reported that principal photography began 26 Apr 1993. Locations included a fifteenth century manor house in the village of Petronell; Vienna’s Hofburg Palace; the Lichtenstein and Kreuzenstein castles; the village of Perchtoldsdorf; and the underground, water-filled caves of Seegrotte near the town of Hinterbrühl. The final weeks of filming took place at the port of Charleston in Cornwall, England, which stood in for the French port city of “Calais” and utilized an outfitted, 1948 square sail clipper. In his 12 Nov 1993 Rolling Stone review, Peter Travers noted that production cost roughly $30 million.
       As reported in the 26 Oct 1993 LAT, singer-songwriter Bryan Adams flew from London, England, to Los Angeles, CA, to record the song “All For Love” in two separate sessions with fellow performers Sting and Rod Stewart. The three later united to film a music video in early Nov 1993.
       On 24 Aug 1993, DV announced the Thanksgiving weekend release date had been moved up to 12 Nov 1993. According to the 24 Sep 1993 HR, The Three Musketeers received the highest test ratings for any Disney picture to date, and debuted as the opening night film at ShowEast in Atlantic City, NJ, on 26 Oct 1993. As a result of its popularity at the exhibition, the 29 Oct 1993 DV reported the studio chose to increase the number of prints in distribution from roughly 1,500 to more than 2,000.
       Despite the early hype, the film received overwhelmingly negative reviews from critics who questioned the necessity of yet another adaptation of Dumas’s novel and disapproved of the younger cast. A 16 Jun 1994 HR advertisement cited a domestic gross of $53,898,845.
      End credits state: “Produced in cooperation with Wolfgang Odelga Filmproduction, GmbH, Vienna and the Vienna Film Financing Fund/City of Vienna.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1992
p. 3.
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1993
p. 1, 37.
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1993
p. 1, 37.
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1993.
---
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 1992
pp. 1-2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 1992
p. 1, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Sep 1993
p. 3, 30.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1993
p. 6, 25.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1994.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
12 Nov 1993
Section C, p. 10.
People
15 Mar 1993.
---
Rolling Stone
12 Nov 1993.
---
Screen International
22 Jan 1993.
---
Screen International
26 Mar 1993.
---
Variety
11 Jan 1993.
---
Variety
18 Jan 1993.
---
Variety
22 Mar 1993.
---
Variety
22 Nov 1993
pp. 32-33
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Walt Disney Pictures presents
In association with Caravan Pictures
A Stephen Herek film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
3d asst dir (Austria)
3d asst dir (Austria)
3d asst dir (UK)
2d unit dir
Asst dir/Prod mgr, 2d unit
2d asst dir/1st asst dir (UK), 2d unit
3d asst dir (Austria), 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
"A" cam op/Steadicam® op
"A" cam focus puller
"A" cam clapper/Loader
"B" cam op
"B" cam focus puller (UK)
"B" cam clapper/Loader (UK)
Video op
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Best boy (UK)
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Cam, 2d unit
"A" cam op/Steadicam® op, 2d unit
"A" focus puller, 2d unit
"A" clapper/Loader (UK), 2d unit
"A" clapper/Loader (UK), 2d unit
"B" focus puller, 2d unit
"B" focus puller (UK), 2d unit
"B" clapper/Loader, 2d unit
"B" clapper/Loader (UK), 2d unit
Gaffer (UK), 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Supv art dir
Art dir (UK)
Asst art dir
Sketch/Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post prod supv
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec (Austria)
Asst set dec/Draftsman (Austria)
Draftsman
Draftsman
Draftsman
Prop master
Supv standby prop (Austria)
Supv dressing props (Austria)
Supv dressing props (Austria)
Prop buyer (Austria)
Action vehicles/Weapons coord (Austria)
Action vehicles/Weapons coord (Austria)
Action vehicles/Weapons coord (Austria)
Armourer
Sword master
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Supv rigger
Supv rigger
Scenic supv
Scenic artist
Supv painter
Supv painter
Supv painter
Supv plasterer
Supv plasterer
Supv plasterer
Sculptor
Sculptor
Props (UK)
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Ward mistress
Ward, 2d unit
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman (Austria)
Cableman (Austria)
Cableman (UK)
Sd des & supv sd ed
Sd des & supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
ADR supv
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR asst
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Addl sd processing
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
ADR mixer
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Sd mixer, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
SFX wire supv
Sr SFX tech
Sr SFX tech
Sr SFX tech
Sr SFX tech
Sr SFX tech
Sr SFX tech (UK)
Title des
Titles & opticals
Matte paintings by
Visual eff prod, Dream Quest Images
Head of prod, Dream Quest Images
Head of digital imaging, Dream Quest Images
Prod mgr, Dream Quest Images
Tech dir, Dream Quest Images
Compositor, Dream Quest Images
Compositor, Dream Quest Images
Digital matte artist, Dream Quest Images
Digital matte artist, Dream Quest Images
Visual eff ed, Dream Quest Images
Asst ed, Dream Quest Images
MAKEUP
Chief makeup
Asst makeup
Mr. Sheen's makeup
Ms. De Mornay's makeup
Makeup supv
Chief hairdresser
Asst hairdresser
Asst makeup/Hairdresser
Hair, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Dial coach
Horse master
Prod coord (Austria)
Unit coord (Austria)
Unit mgr (Austria)
Unit mgr (Austria)
Asst unit mgr (Austria)
Office prod asst (Austria)
Prod coord (UK)
Prod asst (UK)
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Loc accountant (Austria)
Asst loc accountant (Austria)
Computer op (Austria)
Loc accountant (UK)
Asst to Mr. Roth
Asst to Mr. Birnbaum
Asst to co-prods
Asst to Mr. Herek
Asst to Mr. Sheen
Loc mgr (Austria)
Asst loc mgr (Austria)
Asst loc mgr (Austria)
Loc mgr (UK)
Asst loc mgr (UK)
Unit pub
Transport mgr
Transport capt
Transport mgr (UK)
Animal handler (Austria)
Physical trainer
Casting (UK), Davis & Zimmerman
Casting (UK)
Casting (Austria & Germany)
Casting (Austria & Germany)
Casting consultant
Casting consultant
Casting consultant
Nurse (Austria)
Catering (Austria)
GmbH
Catering (UK)
Scr supv, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt double (Charlie Sheen)
Stunt double (Kiefer Sutherland)
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas (New York
London, 1911).
SONGS
“All For Love,” performed by Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart, and Sting, written by Bryan Adams, Robert John “Mutt” Lange, and Michael Kamen, produced by Chris Thomas, Bryan Adams, and David Nicholas, Bryan Adams and Sting appear courtesy of A&M Records, Rod Stewart appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc.
“A L’entrada Del Temps Clar,” from Troubadours, performed by Rene Clemencic & the Clemencic Consort, recorded by Harmonia Mundi France, courtesy of Harmonia Mundi USA, Inc.
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 November 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 12 November 1993
Production Date:
began 26 April 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
9 November 1993
Copyright Number:
PA659806
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®; Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
Austria, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1625 France, the king has been assassinated and the throne ascended by his impressionable son, Louis. The corrupt Cardinal Richelieu has positioned himself as the king’s chief advisor and intends to usurp power before the boy comes of age at the end of the week. As his first executive order, Richelieu disbands the king’s guard, known as the Musketeers, and reassigns them to the infantry in preparation for impending war with England. Unaware of the recent changes, the noble yet hot-headed D’Artagnan prepares to move to Paris to become a Musketeer like his father, who died trying to save the former king’s life. Before he leaves, a man named Girard challenges D’Artagnan to a duel to protect his sister’s honor after he caught the would-be Musketeer kissing her goodbye. A skilled swordsman, D’Artagnan easily defeats Girard, but his opponent’s four brothers chase him out of town. En route to Paris, D’Artagnan meets Constance, a lady-in-waiting serving under Louis’s wife, Queen Anne of Austria. She wishes D’Artagnan luck in his quest to become a Musketeer, and he continues on his journey. Once he reaches the palace, he discovers the Musketeers have been dissolved, but separately encounters three former members who have refused to relinquish their responsibilities to the king: the moody and anguished Athos; the gregarious Porthos; and the philandering Aramis, a former student of theology. Put off by his arrogance, the men each challenge D’Artagnan to a duel later that afternoon. Meanwhile, King Louis stands up to Richelieu for disbanding the Musketeers too hastily, which prompts the cardinal to maximize his efforts to quash the boy king’s authority. With a team of personal guards, he sends Count de ... +


In 1625 France, the king has been assassinated and the throne ascended by his impressionable son, Louis. The corrupt Cardinal Richelieu has positioned himself as the king’s chief advisor and intends to usurp power before the boy comes of age at the end of the week. As his first executive order, Richelieu disbands the king’s guard, known as the Musketeers, and reassigns them to the infantry in preparation for impending war with England. Unaware of the recent changes, the noble yet hot-headed D’Artagnan prepares to move to Paris to become a Musketeer like his father, who died trying to save the former king’s life. Before he leaves, a man named Girard challenges D’Artagnan to a duel to protect his sister’s honor after he caught the would-be Musketeer kissing her goodbye. A skilled swordsman, D’Artagnan easily defeats Girard, but his opponent’s four brothers chase him out of town. En route to Paris, D’Artagnan meets Constance, a lady-in-waiting serving under Louis’s wife, Queen Anne of Austria. She wishes D’Artagnan luck in his quest to become a Musketeer, and he continues on his journey. Once he reaches the palace, he discovers the Musketeers have been dissolved, but separately encounters three former members who have refused to relinquish their responsibilities to the king: the moody and anguished Athos; the gregarious Porthos; and the philandering Aramis, a former student of theology. Put off by his arrogance, the men each challenge D’Artagnan to a duel later that afternoon. Meanwhile, King Louis stands up to Richelieu for disbanding the Musketeers too hastily, which prompts the cardinal to maximize his efforts to quash the boy king’s authority. With a team of personal guards, he sends Count de Rochefort to arrest Aramis, Athos, and Porthos at the Musketeers’ headquarters. They resist, reminding Rochefort that they also successfully cast him out of the Musketeers. Later, they meet D’Artagnan for their appointed duels and reveal themselves as members of the king’s guard. The meeting is interrupted by four of the cardinal’s men, and D’Artagnan helps the Musketeers fight. Although they are impressed by his skills, they refuse to let him join their cause and flee. Rochefort locks D’Artagnan in a tower cell and confiscates the boy’s golden rapier, which once belonged to his father. D’Artagnan later escapes his cell and overhears Cardinal Richelieu meeting with Milady de Winter, a countess who frequently remarries and kills her husbands for financial and political gain. Richelieu enlists her to deliver a peace treaty to the English Duke of Buckingham, which must be signed before the king’s upcoming birthday. D’Artagnan is caught spying, and he is sentenced to be beheaded. The three Musketeers save him from execution, and they escape in the cardinal’s carriage. Once D’Artagnan relays Richelieu’s plan, the Musketeers decide to obtain the treaty and prove the cardinal guilty of treason. While resting at an inn, Porthos and Aramis teach D’Artagnan how to seduce a woman with poetry and passionate kisses. Athos, however, tells a cautionary tale about a woman he once loved and betrayed after learning she was to be executed for crimes she claimed she did not commit. In the morning, D’Artagnan and the Musketeers split up to evade the patrols sent to find them. As they ride, Athos reveals that D’Artagnan’s father died after a fellow Musketeer exposed him for discovering an assassination plot against the former king. When they are attacked, he instructs D’Artagnan to continue alone to the port city of Calais, and intercept the cardinal’s messenger. Back at the palace, Constance tells Queen Anne about her feelings for D’Artagnan, and the queen admits she has grown attracted to her husband despite their loveless arranged marriage. Although Cardinal Richelieu assures King Louis of his loyalty, he attempts to seduce the queen, hoping she will assist him in his rise to power. At nightfall, D’Artagnan collapses from exhaustion just outside Calais, and Milady de Winter discovers his unconscious body. He awakens in her chambers without his clothes, and, unaware she is the messenger he is pursuing, D’Artagnan reveals he is on a mission to stop a spy from leaving the country. When he thwarts her attacks, Milady de Winter opts to take him with her as a prisoner. At the docks, the other Musketeers arrive, and Athos recognizes Milady de Winter as his former lover, Sabine. She relinquishes the treaty, but is immediately captured by the vengeful brother of her most recent husband and sentenced to die. The Musketeers learn that the agreement is contingent on a demonstration of the cardinal’s power, and they need Milady de Winter’s help to determine his traitorous plan. Before her execution the following morning, Milady de Winter tells Athos that Richelieu intends to assassinate the king at his upcoming birthday celebration. After forgiving Athos for abandoning her, she jumps off a cliff to her death. On the king’s birthday, the Musketeers don their former uniforms and fight the cardinal’s guards in the palace courtyard as D’Artagnan disarms a shooter positioned on the roof. Realizing his plan has failed, Richelieu orders Rochefort to stab King Louis with the sword of D’Artagnan’s father. Richelieu flees with the royal couple as his hostages. Aramis attempts to stop them, but the cardinal shoots him and continues to the dungeons. D’Artagnan reclaims his rapier and duels with Rochefort, while Athos and Porthos tend to Aramis, who was unharmed after the bullet pierced a rosary tucked beneath his doublet. Rochefort identifies himself as the one who betrayed D’Artagnan’s father, and the young man kills him. In the dungeons, the three Musketeers reveal they have seized the treaty, but Richelieu vows to one day gain power and be stronger than ever. King Louis punches Richelieu in the face, and Queen Anne pulls her husband into a loving embrace. Later, the king appoints D’Artagnan to be one of the Musketeers, and Constance kisses him as Porthos and Aramis express their approval. Outside the palace, Girard appears, hoping to revive his feud with D’Artagnan. Porthos, Aramis, and Athos remind their new friend that the Musketeers stand “All for one, one for all,” and together they chase Girard through the streets. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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