Wayne's World 2 (1993)

PG-13 | 91 mins | Comedy | 10 December 1993

Director:

Stephen Surjik

Producer:

Lorne Michaels

Cinematographer:

Francis Kenny

Production Designer:

Gregg Fonseca

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

       During the fight scene between Wayne and “Mr. Wong,” the characters originally speak Cantonese with English subtitles, but switch to speaking Cantonese with different English-speaking voices dubbed over the soundtrack.
       The final dream sequence with “Jim Morrison” ends three different times as Wayne and “Garth Algar” become lost in the desert. Their first attempt to escape the dream world concludes with them dying of thirst. Realizing this is not a “happy ending,” they fantasize driving over a cliff together in a parody of Thelma & Louise (1991, see entry). The scene freezes as Garth says, “Wait! We don’t want to end the movie this way.” In a flash of white, the scene returns to “Waynestock,” which turns out to be a success.
       In the middle of end credits, the “Naked Indian” character appears in a brief scene parodying the 1971 “Keep America Beautiful” anti-pollution campaign commercial. Seeing the trash left behind from Waynestock, he begins to cry, but Wayne and Garth comfort him by cheerfully picking up the waste.
       Additional direct references are made to The Graduate (1967), Field of Dreams (1989), Jurassic Park (1993), and Leprechaun (1993, see entries).
       End credits state: “‘Wayne’s World’ used with permission from NBC, Inc.”; “Special thanks to: Kelly Brine; City of Inglewood, CA; the people of Monrovia, CA and the Monrovia Old Town Merchants’ Association; Lisa Law; National Hockey League Enterprises, Inc.”; “Woodstock® 3 Days of Peace & Music™ and the Dove and Guitar Logo® are trademarks of Woodstock Ventures LC”; and, “Kewpie® is a registered trademark used by permission of Jesco Imports, Inc.”
       An acknowledgment preceding music credits ... More Less

       During the fight scene between Wayne and “Mr. Wong,” the characters originally speak Cantonese with English subtitles, but switch to speaking Cantonese with different English-speaking voices dubbed over the soundtrack.
       The final dream sequence with “Jim Morrison” ends three different times as Wayne and “Garth Algar” become lost in the desert. Their first attempt to escape the dream world concludes with them dying of thirst. Realizing this is not a “happy ending,” they fantasize driving over a cliff together in a parody of Thelma & Louise (1991, see entry). The scene freezes as Garth says, “Wait! We don’t want to end the movie this way.” In a flash of white, the scene returns to “Waynestock,” which turns out to be a success.
       In the middle of end credits, the “Naked Indian” character appears in a brief scene parodying the 1971 “Keep America Beautiful” anti-pollution campaign commercial. Seeing the trash left behind from Waynestock, he begins to cry, but Wayne and Garth comfort him by cheerfully picking up the waste.
       Additional direct references are made to The Graduate (1967), Field of Dreams (1989), Jurassic Park (1993), and Leprechaun (1993, see entries).
       End credits state: “‘Wayne’s World’ used with permission from NBC, Inc.”; “Special thanks to: Kelly Brine; City of Inglewood, CA; the people of Monrovia, CA and the Monrovia Old Town Merchants’ Association; Lisa Law; National Hockey League Enterprises, Inc.”; “Woodstock® 3 Days of Peace & Music™ and the Dove and Guitar Logo® are trademarks of Woodstock Ventures LC”; and, “Kewpie® is a registered trademark used by permission of Jesco Imports, Inc.”
       An acknowledgment preceding music credits reads: “The music in the dentist drilling scene was composed by Carter Burwell with soprano saxophone performance by Steve Tavaglione. Kenny G did not authorize the use of his name or contribute any of the music to this motion picture.” A 12 Dec 1993 LAT indicated that Kenny G refused to provide a recording because he feared that the representation of his work would not be “complimentary.” A 13 Aug 1993 HR item suggested that saxophonist Dave Koz filmed a scene at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena, but he does not appear onscreen and final performance credit was given to Tavaglione.
       Various contemporary sources referred to the film as Wayne’s World II.
       Earning more than $120 million at the box-office, Wayne’s World (1992, see entry) was a surprise hit and prompted Paramount Pictures to quickly begin preparation of a sequel. The 23 Mar 1992 Var stated that the principal actors’ original contracts contained “muddy” sequel deals that needed to be re-negotiated to allow higher salaries and script approval privileges for Mike Myers and Dana Carvey. Due to these delays, the 14 Sep 1992 DV stated that production was not expected to begin until late Feb 1993. Although the 7 Dec 1992 LAT suggested that Myers planned to complete the script on his own, onscreen credits indicate that he was once again joined by fellow Wayne’s World writers Bonnie and Terry Turner.
       A 31 Aug 1992 DV item indicated that Rob Lowe was in talks to return for the sequel, but the 4 Jul 1993 LAT reported that he would not be reprising his role as “Benjamin Oliver,” and was instead considered to play a character named “Phillip.” Lowe ultimately chose to pass on the project, suggesting that appearing in an entirely different role in a Wayne’s World follow-up might “confuse the audience.” Christopher Walken was hired as his replacement, and the character’s name was changed to “Bobby Cahn” for the final film.
       The 3 Jun 1993 DV stated that Carvey was initially dissatisfied with the lack of screen time given to his character before Myers added love interest “Honey Hornée,” played by Kim Basinger. According to the Jul 1993 issue of Us magazine, the script was still incomplete and several roles were yet to be cast only a month before filming was set to begin. With few other projects scheduled for release that winter, however, Paramount rushed the film into production.
       Studio publicity materials in AMPAS library files confirm that principal photography began 24 Jun 1993 in Los Angeles, CA. Locations included: Stage 31 at Paramount studios, where the “Wayne’s World” television set was constructed; The African, an Inglewood, CA, clothing boutique that stood in for “Stan Mikita’s Donuts”; and the former Eureka restaurant brewery in West Los Angeles, where the “Comrades” nightclub was set. Aerosmith concert sequences were comprised of footage from the band’s 1 Aug 1993 “Get A Grip” tour performance in San Diego, CA. In addition to filming the concert, Aerosmith performed a special set after the show, and returned to Paramount studios to film backstage scenes with Myers and Carvey. Waynestock scenes were filmed 17 Aug 1993 at the Calamigos Ranch in Malibu Canyon. Additional shooting took place at the California-Arizona border near Yuma, AZ, and a second unit traveled to Chicago and Aurora, IL, and London, England. A 27 Aug 1993 DV item noted that Wayne’s World 2 marked the feature film debut of director Stephen Surjik. Production was estimated to cost almost twice the $20 million budget on Wayne’s World.
       The 10 Dec 1993 WSJ noted that Garth wears a T-shirt bearing the logo of Video Toaster, a video editing computer program created by the Topeka, KS-based company, NewTek Inc. The device was designed by the actor’s brother, Brad Carvey, who was the real-life inspiration for his Garth character and also helped design the Wayne’s World studio set. Dana Carvey reportedly chose to advertise the company as a “personal favor” to his brother.
       The 19 Nov 1993 BAM confirmed that Gin Blossoms and Urge Overkill performer Nash Kato make cameo appearances at the end of the film, but they are not listed in onscreen cast credits. Evan Dando was also expected to appear, but his inclusion in the film could not be verified. A 22 Jul 1993 LADN item stated that filmmakers planned to hire look-alikes for actors Dustin Hoffman, Joe Pesci, Patrick Stewart, and Charlton Heston. While the look-alikes for Hoffman, Pesci, and Stewart were not featured in the final film, Heston himself makes an appearance as the “Good actor” who replaces “Bad actor” Al Hansen in the middle of his scene.
       The 13 Aug 1993 HR reported that Paramount filed a preemptive lawsuit against Jim Morrison’s heirs to defend the studio’s “constitutional and legal right” to hire a Morrison look-alike after the family repeatedly denied rights to use Morrison’s image. It is undetermined if Morrison’s heirs pursued legal action, since Michael Nickles’ portrayal remains in the film.
       A 21 May 1993 DV article reported that Paramount launched a $100 million joint advertising campaign with McDonald’s for Wayne’s World 2 and Addams Family Values (1993, see entry), in which both films were cross-promoted through the home video sales of their predecessors, Wayne’s World and The Addams Family (1991, see entry).
       According to the 14 Dec 1993 DV, Wayne’s World 2 placed first at the box-office with an opening weekend gross of $13,516,699. Although it did not achieve the financial success of the first film, critics generally considered the sequel to be on par with the original.
      Mike Myers’ character, “Wayne Campbell,” frequently addresses the audience and acknowledges action is occurring within the story of Wayne’s World 2.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BAM
19 Nov 1993
p. 13.
Daily Variety
14 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1992.
---
Daily Variety
21 May 1993
p. 1, 28.
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1993
p. 19.
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1993.
---
Daily Variety
14 Dec 1993
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1993
p. 10, 74.
Los Angeles Daily News
22 Jul 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Dec 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 1993
pp. 31-32.
Los Angeles Times
10 Dec 1993
Calendar, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
12 Dec 1993.
---
New York Times
10 Dec 1993
Section C, p. 20.
Us
Jul 1993.
---
Variety
23 Mar 1992
p. 1, 131.
Variety
20 Dec 1993
p. 31.
WSJ
10 Dec 1993.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Lorne Michaels Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
B cam 1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Addl photog by
2d unit dir of photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Still photog
Video & computer supv
Video asst
Video playback
Chapman cranes and dollies provided by
Cam dollies provided by
Remote crane supplied by
Automated lighting provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Asst to prod des
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Lead person
Set dressing buyer
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Set des
Set des
Const coord
Const foreperson
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key costumer
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus ed
Mus contractor
Mus supv
Mus clearance
SOUND
Sd mixer
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv dial ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Matte painting
Title des
Titles & opticals
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst loc mgr
Voice casting
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Asst to Mr. Michaels
Asst to Mr. Koch, Jr.
Asst to Mr. Surjik
Asst to Ms. Minot
Asst to Mr. Thompson
Asst to Mr. Myers
Asst to Mr. Myers
Asst to Mr. Carvey
Asst to Mr. & Mrs. Turner
Prod assoc
Prod liaison
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Film consultant Aerosmith segment
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the characters created by Mike Myers.
AUTHOR
SONGS
“Frankenstein,” written and performed by Edgar Winter, courtesy of Windswept Pacific Entertainment Co./Monigar Productions
“’Wayne’s World’ Theme,” by Mike Myers and G. E. Smith
“’Batman’ Theme,” by Neal Hefti
+
SONGS
“Frankenstein,” written and performed by Edgar Winter, courtesy of Windswept Pacific Entertainment Co./Monigar Productions
“’Wayne’s World’ Theme,” by Mike Myers and G. E. Smith
“’Batman’ Theme,” by Neal Hefti
“Dream Weaver,” written and performed by Gary Wright, courtesy of Reprise Records, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“WPIG Logo,” by Adam Smalley
“Radar Love,” by George Kooymans and Barry Hay, performed by Golden Earring, courtesy of MCA Records/Polygram International Music
“Dude (Looks Like A Lady) (Live Version),” by Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, and Desmond Child, performed by Aerosmith, Aerosmith performs courtesy of Geffen Records, Inc.
“Mary’s House,” by Linda Perry and Shaunna Hall, performed and produced by 4 Non Blondes, co-produced by David Bianco, 4 Non Blondes perform courtesy of Interscope Records
“Guitar Licks,” by Michael McMahan
“Rule Britannia,” by Thomas Arne, performed by Grenadier Guards Band, by arrangement with Allegro Corp. and Source/Q
“Louie, Louie,” by Richard Berry, performed and produced by Robert Plant, Robert Plant performs courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp./Phonogram Limited
“Twist and Shout,” by Bert Russell and Philip Medley
“I Love Rock & Roll,” by Alan Merrill and Jake Hooker, performed by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, courtesy of Blackheart Records
“Can’t Get Enough,” by Mick Ralphs, performed by Bad Company, courtesy of ATCO Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“’Mission: Impossible’ Theme,” by Lalo Schifrin
“Wipe Out,” by The Surfaris, performed by The Ventures, courtesy of EMI Records USA, a division of ERG, under license from CEMA Special Markets
“Step It Up,” by Robert Birch and Nicholas Hallam, performed by Stereo MC’s, courtesy of Gee Street/Island Records, Ltd.
“Y.M.C.A.,” by Henri Belolo, Jacques Morali, and Victor Willis, performed by Village People, courtesy of Scorpio Music/Polygram Special Markets
“Superstar,” by Leon Russell and Bonnie Bramlett, performed by Superfan, produced by Bernard Edwards, Superfan performs courtesy of WEA Records Ltd./Geffen Records, Inc..
“Spirit in the Sky,” written and performed by Norman Greenbaum, courtesy of Trans/Tone Productions
“The Girl From Ipanema,” by Antonio Carlos Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes, and Norman Gimbel, performed by Stan Getz and Astrud Gilberto, courtesy of Polygram Special Markets
“Romeo And Juliet – Fantasy Overture,” by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, performed by Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, courtesy of Laserlight Digital, by arrangement with Source/Q
“Idiot Summer,” written, performed and produced by Gin Blossoms, Gin Blossoms performs courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Out There,” by J Mascis, performed Dinosaur Jr., Dinosaur Jr. performs courtesy of Sire Records/Blanco Y Negro/WEA Records Ltd.
“Show Me The Way,” written and performed by Peter Frampton, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Hey Joe,” by Billy Roberts, performed by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, courtesy of Elber B. V.
“Age Of Consent,” by Stephen Morris, Peter Hook, Bernard Sumner, and Gillian Gilbert
“Mrs. Robinson,” by Paul Simon, performed by Simon & Garfunkel, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing, also performed by Lemonheads, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Amen Chords,” by Dave Grusin
“Wedding March From ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’” by Felix Mendelssohn, arranged and performed by Anthony Newman, courtesy of Sony Classical, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Shut Up And Dance (Live Version),” by Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, Jack Blades and Tommy Shaw, performed by Aerosmith, Aerosmith performs courtesy of Geffen Records, Inc.
“The Wind Cries Mary,” by Jimi Hendrix, performed by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, courtesy of Elber B. V., “'Wayne’s World’ Theme (Extended Version),” by Mike Myers and G. E. Smith, performed by Wayne and Garth (Mike Myers and Dana Carvey).
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Wayne's World II
Release Date:
10 December 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 December 1993
Production Date:
began 24 June 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
4 January 1994
Copyright Number:
PA683312
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32546
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After more than a year of recording in his parents' basement, Wayne Campbell moves the headquarters of his public-access television program, Wayne’s World, to an abandoned doll factory in downtown Aurora, Illinois. Although he is happily dating his rock star girl friend, Cassandra Wong, Wayne feels pressure to do something more significant with his life. Following a taping of Wayne’s World, he and his best friend, Garth Algar, attend an Aerosmith concert in Chicago. During the show, Wayne and Garth surf the crowd and use their backstage passes to meet the band. Cassandra introduces them to her record producer, Bobby Cahn, who whisks her away to a restricted afterparty. That night, The Doors frontman, Jim Morrison, speaks to Wayne in a dream, accompanied by a Native-American man Wayne calls a “weird, naked Indian.” Morrison tells Wayne to find a British roadie named Del Preston, who will help him put on a concert in Aurora. In the morning, he and Garth visit Cassandra at Bobby Cahn’s recording studio and tell her their plan to host a festival called “Waynestock,” promising appearances by Aerosmith, Pearl Jam, Van Halen, and comedian Rip Taylor. Despite Bobby’s doubts, Cassandra also agrees to perform, and Wayne and Garth fly to London and track down Del Preston. When Wayne relays his prophecy, Del Preston realizes he had the same dream, and agrees to ... +


After more than a year of recording in his parents' basement, Wayne Campbell moves the headquarters of his public-access television program, Wayne’s World, to an abandoned doll factory in downtown Aurora, Illinois. Although he is happily dating his rock star girl friend, Cassandra Wong, Wayne feels pressure to do something more significant with his life. Following a taping of Wayne’s World, he and his best friend, Garth Algar, attend an Aerosmith concert in Chicago. During the show, Wayne and Garth surf the crowd and use their backstage passes to meet the band. Cassandra introduces them to her record producer, Bobby Cahn, who whisks her away to a restricted afterparty. That night, The Doors frontman, Jim Morrison, speaks to Wayne in a dream, accompanied by a Native-American man Wayne calls a “weird, naked Indian.” Morrison tells Wayne to find a British roadie named Del Preston, who will help him put on a concert in Aurora. In the morning, he and Garth visit Cassandra at Bobby Cahn’s recording studio and tell her their plan to host a festival called “Waynestock,” promising appearances by Aerosmith, Pearl Jam, Van Halen, and comedian Rip Taylor. Despite Bobby’s doubts, Cassandra also agrees to perform, and Wayne and Garth fly to London and track down Del Preston. When Wayne relays his prophecy, Del Preston realizes he had the same dream, and agrees to help. At Stan Mikita’s Donuts, Preston tells stories about the early years of his career to a rapt crowd, while Wayne and Garth seek a possible venue at Adlai Stevenson Memorial Park. The next day, the friends apply for a festival permit at the Aurora Parks and Recreation office and meet Betty Jo, an employee with blonde hair and glasses exactly like Garth's. The head of the department begrudgingly gives them the paperwork, which must be returned with a $5,000 deposit. Later, Cassandra dismisses Wayne’s fears that she is having an affair with Bobby, reminding him that she risks deportation if her record deal falls through. However, Bobby plans to sever Cassandra’s relationship with Wayne so he can take her to Los Angeles, California, to finish the album. Meanwhile, Garth meets a beautiful woman named Honey Hornée at the Laundromat. Honey asks him on a date, but Garth becomes flustered and leaves. When Cassandra’s father visits from Hong Kong, he expresses disapproval of her relationship with Wayne. Mr. Wong challenges Wayne to a fight, and is impressed enough by the young man’s martial arts skills to change his opinion. To raise money for the park deposit, Wayne, Garth, and Del Preston host a party at a local bar. There, Cassandra dances with Bobby and informs Wayne that the producer wants to take her to Los Angeles. Jealous, Wayne, Garth, and two of their friends disguise themselves to spy on Bobby and Cassandra as they eat lunch. Cassandra recognizes Wayne dressed as a telephone repairman, and the stalkers flee, seeking refuge in a “gay” club. While attempting to leave, they are mistaken for a Village People cover band and forced to dance onstage. That evening, Wayne breaks up with Cassandra, and Garth goes out with Honey. Despite Garth’s awkwardness, Honey seduces him, and in the morning he proudly tells Wayne he lost his virginity. Still struggling to book bands and sell tickets, Wayne and Garth go on radio to promote the festival. Wayne telephones Bobby in Los Angeles asking for Cassandra, but he claims to not know where she is. That night, Wayne has another dream featuring Jim Morrison, and expresses concern that he will not be able to organize Waynestock in time. Morrison reassures him that the audience will come provided he can book the bands. Wayne’s discouragement deepens when he sees Cassandra on The Tonight Show and she acknowledges Bobby offstage. Meanwhile, Garth ends his relationship with Honey upon learning she wants him to murder her abusive ex-husband. That afternoon, Rip Taylor shows up at the park grounds, claiming Jim Morrison urged him to attend Waynestock in a dream. Soon after, a group of hippies crowd Mikita’s donut shop looking for the festival. As more attendees arrive, Wayne worries why Cassandra is not there to perform as promised. He telephones her father, who reveals he selected Bobby as a more suitable match for his daughter and has arranged for them to be married. With little time left before the concert, Wayne speeds off in search of Cassandra, but crashes his car into a fire hydrant. Finding a red Alfa Romeo Spider parked on the street, Wayne drives to the church and pounds on the glass window only to realize he has crashed the wrong wedding. Dismayed, he turns around and finds himself in front of an identical church directly across the street. Inside, he sees Cassandra and Bobby at the altar and interrupts the ceremony by screaming Cassandra’s name. The bride runs to join him, and they board a bus back to the park, where Garth struggles to entertain the impatient crowd. Once they arrive, Wayne has a vision in which he and Garth meet Jim Morrison. With none of the bands expected to attend, Morrison says that organizing Waynestock was meant as an exercise for Wayne to learn about himself. A short time later, however, a blue stretch limousine pulls up to the stage and the members of Aerosmith get out. As the group performs, Morrison reminds Wayne that he must face adult responsibilities, but assures him that Cassandra loves him for who he is. Garth dances with his doppelganger, Betty Jo, and more bands arrive to round out the festival. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.