The Richest Girl in the World (1934)

78 or 80 mins | Romantic comedy | 21 September 1934

Director:

William A. Seiter

Writer:

Norman Krasna

Cinematographer:

Nicholas Musuraca

Editor:

George Crone

Production Designers:

Van Nest Polglase, Charles Kirk

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

An Apr 1934 HR news item announced that RKO outbid M-G-M for the rights to Norman Krasna's original screenplay, paying the writer $4,000. At that time, the picture was being considered as a vehicle for Ann Harding. According to a Jun 1934 HR news item, John Norton was engaged by RKO to write the screenplay for the film. The exact nature of Norton's contribution to the production has not been determined. RKO borrowed Miriam Hopkins from Paramount and Fay Wray from Twentieth Century for this production. According to a HR production chart, Charles Coleman and William Burress were in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Some exteriors for the film were shot at Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to DV . Krasna was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Story category, but lost to Arthur Caesar, who wrote Manhattan Melodrama . According to modern sources, producer Pandro Berman bought Krasna's story with his own money, then sold the idea to his RKO superiors. Modern sources contend that during this period, the twenty-two-year-old Krasna was being blackballed by M-G-M's Louis B. Mayer, and as a result of this blackballing, other studios were reluctant to hire him. RKO remade Krasna's story in 1944 under the title Bride By Mistake . That film was directed by Richard Wallace and starred Laraine Day and Alan ... More Less

An Apr 1934 HR news item announced that RKO outbid M-G-M for the rights to Norman Krasna's original screenplay, paying the writer $4,000. At that time, the picture was being considered as a vehicle for Ann Harding. According to a Jun 1934 HR news item, John Norton was engaged by RKO to write the screenplay for the film. The exact nature of Norton's contribution to the production has not been determined. RKO borrowed Miriam Hopkins from Paramount and Fay Wray from Twentieth Century for this production. According to a HR production chart, Charles Coleman and William Burress were in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Some exteriors for the film were shot at Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to DV . Krasna was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Story category, but lost to Arthur Caesar, who wrote Manhattan Melodrama . According to modern sources, producer Pandro Berman bought Krasna's story with his own money, then sold the idea to his RKO superiors. Modern sources contend that during this period, the twenty-two-year-old Krasna was being blackballed by M-G-M's Louis B. Mayer, and as a result of this blackballing, other studios were reluctant to hire him. RKO remade Krasna's story in 1944 under the title Bride By Mistake . That film was directed by Richard Wallace and starred Laraine Day and Alan Marshall. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Jul 34
p. 5.
Daily Variety
25 Jul 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Sep 34
p. 3.
HF
4 Aug 34
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 34
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 34
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 34
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 34
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
27 Aug 34
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Sep 34
p. 25.
New York Times
21 Sep 34
p. 21.
Variety
25 Sep 34
p. 13.
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 September 1934
Production Date:
13 July--15 August 1934
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Copyright Date:
20 September 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4958
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78 or 80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
164
SYNOPSIS

To avoid publicity upon her return to the United States, Dorothy Hunter, the "richest girl in the world" whom the "world" has never seen, uses her secretary, Sylvia Lockwood, to impersonate her. Just before she is to announce her upcoming marriage, Dorothy's fiancé Donald breaks their engagement, explaining that he has fallen in love with someone else. Devastated by Donald's contention that no man could ever love her for herself, Dorothy enlists Sylvia to pose as her at her engagement party. There, while pretending to be Sylvia, Dorothy meets handsome Tony Travers and plays a game of pool with him. Tony, believing Dorothy to be the secretary, invites her to a canoe ride, but winds up taking Sylvia instead. Furious, Dorothy, with Sylvia's husband Phillip in tow, pursues Tony and Sylvia in a speedboat and causes their canoe to capsize. Although Tony insists that his interest in Sylvia is strictly polite, Dorothy insinuates that if the opportunity to marry the heiress presented itself, he would take it. While maintaining that he prefers Dorothy, Tony accepts the false secretary's challenge to woo "the heiress" and agrees to invest his modest savings in a speculative stock venture in order to finance his courtship. After two weeks of romancing, Dorothy, whose guardian, John Connors, believes that her "love tests" are unfair, advises Tony to propose to Sylvia during a scheduled Adirondack retreat. Buoyed by Dorothy's confidence in him, Tony goes to the mountain retreat as planned, unaware that Dorothy has arranged for them to spend the first evening alone. As Tony lies with his head in her lap in front of a cozy fire, ... +


To avoid publicity upon her return to the United States, Dorothy Hunter, the "richest girl in the world" whom the "world" has never seen, uses her secretary, Sylvia Lockwood, to impersonate her. Just before she is to announce her upcoming marriage, Dorothy's fiancé Donald breaks their engagement, explaining that he has fallen in love with someone else. Devastated by Donald's contention that no man could ever love her for herself, Dorothy enlists Sylvia to pose as her at her engagement party. There, while pretending to be Sylvia, Dorothy meets handsome Tony Travers and plays a game of pool with him. Tony, believing Dorothy to be the secretary, invites her to a canoe ride, but winds up taking Sylvia instead. Furious, Dorothy, with Sylvia's husband Phillip in tow, pursues Tony and Sylvia in a speedboat and causes their canoe to capsize. Although Tony insists that his interest in Sylvia is strictly polite, Dorothy insinuates that if the opportunity to marry the heiress presented itself, he would take it. While maintaining that he prefers Dorothy, Tony accepts the false secretary's challenge to woo "the heiress" and agrees to invest his modest savings in a speculative stock venture in order to finance his courtship. After two weeks of romancing, Dorothy, whose guardian, John Connors, believes that her "love tests" are unfair, advises Tony to propose to Sylvia during a scheduled Adirondack retreat. Buoyed by Dorothy's confidence in him, Tony goes to the mountain retreat as planned, unaware that Dorothy has arranged for them to spend the first evening alone. As Tony lies with his head in her lap in front of a cozy fire, Dorothy falls deeper in love with him, but is dismayed when, after confessing his love for her, he admits that Sylvia "wouldn't have him anyway." In spite of John's continued protests, Dorothy refuses to accept Tony's love until she has proven to herself that she, as a secretary, is his first choice. To that end, she pushes Tony to propose to Sylvia the next night, and as instructed by Dorothy, Sylvia accepts. Later, however, Tony sees Phillip sneak into Sylvia's bedroom, and the next morning, he slugs Phillip at the breakfast table and denounces Sylvia. As a last test of love, Dorothy explains to Tony that she had switched rooms with Sylvia. When Tony then carries her off in a display of masculine authority and marries her, Dorothy finally believes in his love. Although Dorothy insists on continuing her impersonation during her ocean cruise honeymoon, John surreptitiously orders the newly married couple to be given luxurious accomodations, delighting Tony with the ship's remarkable second-class service. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.