Gold Rush Maisie (1940)

82 mins | Drama | 26 July 1940

Director:

Edwin L. Marin

Producer:

J. Walter Ruben

Cinematographer:

Charles Lawton

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to news items in HR, producer J. Walter Ruben and director Norman Taurog filled in for Edwin L. Marin when he became ill. This picture was the third in the Maisie series. For additional information about the series, consult the Series Index and See Entry for Maisie. ...

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According to news items in HR, producer J. Walter Ruben and director Norman Taurog filled in for Edwin L. Marin when he became ill. This picture was the third in the Maisie series. For additional information about the series, consult the Series Index and See Entry for Maisie.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1940
p. 3
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1940
p. 1
Film Daily
6 Sep 1940
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1940
pp. 6-7
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1940
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1940
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
26 Jul 1940
p. 5
Motion Picture Herald
27 Jul 1940
p. 34
New York Times
2 Sep 1940
p. 44
Variety
31 Jul 1940
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Fill-In dir
Fill-In dir
Robert Golden
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Asst to prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
DANCE
Square dance calls and group dance instructor
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
26 July 1940
Production Date:
late Apr--late May 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
22 July 1940
LP9810
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6358
SYNOPSIS

Maisie Ravier is en route to a singing job at the Hula Parlor Cafe when her car breaks down near an Arizona ghost town at the edge of Bill Anders' ranch. She seeks refuge at the ranch, and there she meets the misanthropic Bill, who makes a pass at her. After locking Bill out of her room, Maisie indignantly leaves the ranch the next morning and hitchhikes into town. Arriving to find that her job has already been filled, Maisie visits a local diner, where she hears of a gold rush at the ghost town and meets little Jubie Davis. After finishing her dinner, Maisie starts her long trek to Phoenix, and is offered a ride by the Davis family, a pitiful bunch of dispossessed dustbowl farmers who have been lured to Arizona by the promise of gold. Touched by their plight, Maisie spends her last dollar on groceries to feed the hungry children. When the Davis car rolls into town, they find the previously abandoned town filled with poverty-stricken farmers who are being exploited by profit seekers, prompting Maisie to insist that they drive on to Bill's ranch where they can find free water. After bullying Bill into letting the family pitch their tent on his land, Maisie agrees to go into partnership with family head Bert Davis. After days of digging, the partners uncover a promising vein of gold, but must await the assayer's report to ascertain the value of their claim. That night, a violent storm destroys the Davis' tent, and Maisie leads them to shelter inside Bill's house. As the family sleeps, Maisie convinces Bill ...

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Maisie Ravier is en route to a singing job at the Hula Parlor Cafe when her car breaks down near an Arizona ghost town at the edge of Bill Anders' ranch. She seeks refuge at the ranch, and there she meets the misanthropic Bill, who makes a pass at her. After locking Bill out of her room, Maisie indignantly leaves the ranch the next morning and hitchhikes into town. Arriving to find that her job has already been filled, Maisie visits a local diner, where she hears of a gold rush at the ghost town and meets little Jubie Davis. After finishing her dinner, Maisie starts her long trek to Phoenix, and is offered a ride by the Davis family, a pitiful bunch of dispossessed dustbowl farmers who have been lured to Arizona by the promise of gold. Touched by their plight, Maisie spends her last dollar on groceries to feed the hungry children. When the Davis car rolls into town, they find the previously abandoned town filled with poverty-stricken farmers who are being exploited by profit seekers, prompting Maisie to insist that they drive on to Bill's ranch where they can find free water. After bullying Bill into letting the family pitch their tent on his land, Maisie agrees to go into partnership with family head Bert Davis. After days of digging, the partners uncover a promising vein of gold, but must await the assayer's report to ascertain the value of their claim. That night, a violent storm destroys the Davis' tent, and Maisie leads them to shelter inside Bill's house. As the family sleeps, Maisie convinces Bill to abandon his misanthropic ways and begin to trust people. The next morning, the farmers' hopes are crushed when the assayer pronounces that the ore is not worth the cost of mining. As the farmers prepare to return to the road as migrant workers, Maisie explains to Bill that they had turned to prospecting in desperation, as a way to feed their families rather than find their fortunes. Taking Maisie's words to heart, Bill offers his water to irrigate the valley, and as the farmers begin life anew as homesteaders, Maisie strikes out on her own.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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