In Person (1935)

87 or 90 mins | Romantic comedy | 22 November 1935

Director:

William A. Seiter

Writer:

Allan Scott

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Arthur Schmidt

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Tamed. HR announced in Nov 1934 that Fred Astaire was RKO's first choice for the picture's male lead. RKO borrowed George Brent from Warner Bros. for the production. MPH's "The Cutting Room" includes Henry Stephenson and Shelly Hall in the cast, while HR news items and production charts list Jack Hatfield, Monte Vandergrift and Bud Jamison as cast members. The participation of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Scenes for this film were shot at Big Bear Lake in Southern California. Modern sources credit Mel Berns as makeup artist and John Miehle as still photographer. Additional modern source cast includes Lew Kelly (Mountain man), Bob McKenzie (Theater manager), Lee Shumway (Studio representative), Tiny Jones (Woman in theater), William B. Davidson (Director Bill Sutter) and George Davis (Cabbie). Bud Jamison's character is listed as "Man in elevator." According to modern sources, Public Property was a second working title. ...

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The working title of this film was Tamed. HR announced in Nov 1934 that Fred Astaire was RKO's first choice for the picture's male lead. RKO borrowed George Brent from Warner Bros. for the production. MPH's "The Cutting Room" includes Henry Stephenson and Shelly Hall in the cast, while HR news items and production charts list Jack Hatfield, Monte Vandergrift and Bud Jamison as cast members. The participation of these actors in the final film has not been confirmed. Scenes for this film were shot at Big Bear Lake in Southern California. Modern sources credit Mel Berns as makeup artist and John Miehle as still photographer. Additional modern source cast includes Lew Kelly (Mountain man), Bob McKenzie (Theater manager), Lee Shumway (Studio representative), Tiny Jones (Woman in theater), William B. Davidson (Director Bill Sutter) and George Davis (Cabbie). Bud Jamison's character is listed as "Man in elevator." According to modern sources, Public Property was a second working title.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1935
p. 3
Film Daily
2 Nov 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1934
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 1935
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 1935
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 1935
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 1935
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
30 Oct 1935
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
14 Sep 1935
p. 51
Motion Picture Herald
9 Nov 1935
p. 57, 60
New York Times
13 Dec 1935
p. 31
Variety
18 Dec 1935
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Pandro S. Berman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Jimmy Anderson
Asst dir
WRITERS
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Clem A. Portman
Rec
P. J. Faulkner Jr.
Mus rec
DANCE
Dances created by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Don't Mention Love to Me," "Got a New Lease on Life" and "Out of Sight, Out of Mind," music and lyrics by Dorothy Fields and Oscar Levant.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Tamed
Release Date:
22 November 1935
Production Date:
began 29 Jul 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
22 November 1935
LP5986
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87 or 90
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1537
SYNOPSIS

While staying at the Hotel San Francisco, Emory Muir encounters a strange woman in a heavy veil, who faints when she is surrounded by a mob of people gathering around a car accident. After Emory whisks her away in a taxi, the woman, Miss Colfax, asks to return to the hotel, where she finally reveals her bucktoothed face to her benefactor. Later, Miss Colfax, who is in reality Carol Corliss, a beautiful movie star suffering from agoraphobia brought on by a confrontation with over-zealous fans, overhears Emory and his uncle, Judge Thaddeus Parks, discussing the Parks's mountain retreat. In disguise as the homely Miss Colfax, Carol begs Emory to take her with him to the retreat, and he reluctantly drives her there. To protect her reputation, Emory gives Carol the big, untidy cabin, then goes off to sleep in a nearby shack. While bird watching the next morning, Emory spies an undisguised Carol swimming in the lake and follows her wet footprints back to the cabin. Confused and curious, Emory telephones Carol's psychiatrist in San Francisco and demands to know her identity. Although the doctor refuses to name Carol, Emory stumbles on a photograph of the star while he is in town. By the time Emory returns to her cabin, the lazy, tempermental Carol has decided to reveal herself to him and is shocked when he refuses to believe that she is a movie star. In spite of her efforts to convince him, Emory maintains his ruse as a skeptic and bullies her into cleaning up the cabin and cooking his meals. Eventually Jay Holmes, Carol's egotistical co-star, tracks her to the ...

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While staying at the Hotel San Francisco, Emory Muir encounters a strange woman in a heavy veil, who faints when she is surrounded by a mob of people gathering around a car accident. After Emory whisks her away in a taxi, the woman, Miss Colfax, asks to return to the hotel, where she finally reveals her bucktoothed face to her benefactor. Later, Miss Colfax, who is in reality Carol Corliss, a beautiful movie star suffering from agoraphobia brought on by a confrontation with over-zealous fans, overhears Emory and his uncle, Judge Thaddeus Parks, discussing the Parks's mountain retreat. In disguise as the homely Miss Colfax, Carol begs Emory to take her with him to the retreat, and he reluctantly drives her there. To protect her reputation, Emory gives Carol the big, untidy cabin, then goes off to sleep in a nearby shack. While bird watching the next morning, Emory spies an undisguised Carol swimming in the lake and follows her wet footprints back to the cabin. Confused and curious, Emory telephones Carol's psychiatrist in San Francisco and demands to know her identity. Although the doctor refuses to name Carol, Emory stumbles on a photograph of the star while he is in town. By the time Emory returns to her cabin, the lazy, tempermental Carol has decided to reveal herself to him and is shocked when he refuses to believe that she is a movie star. In spite of her efforts to convince him, Emory maintains his ruse as a skeptic and bullies her into cleaning up the cabin and cooking his meals. Eventually Jay Holmes, Carol's egotistical co-star, tracks her to the cabin and demands that she return to the city with him. Carol, who is now in love with Emory, threatens Jay with a gun just as Sheriff Twing arrives. After the disapproving sheriff disarms Carol, Emory shows up and, telling Jay that he is Carol's psychiatrist, finagles him into staging a phony fight as part of her "treatment." Desperate to prove her identity, Carol then takes Emory to the village movie theater, where her latest picture is being screened. After she "convinces" Emory that she really is Carol Corliss, she announces herself to the audience. In spite of the mob that forms, Carol remains calm and embraces her fans. Although cured of her agoraphobia, Carol fights with Emory over Jay and her career, and the couple separates. The next morning, a weeping Carol connives with Minna, Twing's granddaughter, to have the sheriff force Emory into marrying her on moral grounds. The sheriff, however, confuses Jay with Emory and, at gunpoint, makes the actor sign the marriage license instead of Emory. Before Jay and Carol are pronounced man and wife, Minna rushes in with Emory, who agrees to wed Carol on condition that the marriage be annuled once they have returned to the city. Eventually Carol, who has resumed her movie career, reconciles with Emory, but also learns through Jay that she is not legally married to him.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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