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HISTORY

This film's working title was Concertina . A news item in HR on 20 Jan 1936 stated that the starting date for the film was postponed for the writing of additional dialogue; the delay caused a change in directors from Harold Young to William K. Howard. At that point, filming was slated to start on 27 Jan, but was delayed until mid-Feb because George Raft, set to star with Lombard, walked off the set at the start of production because he objected to the assignment of Ted Tetzlaff as cameraman.
       As reported in MPH on 14 Mar 1936, Raft was suspended from Paramount for his behavior, and was replaced by Fred MacMurray. Raft returned to the studio for Yours for the Asking (see below). According to a HR news item on 27 Mar 1936, Howard, claiming interference on the set by producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr.'s assistant, Dick Blumenthal , refused to continue shooting unless Blumenthal left the set, which he then did. Later, Howard refused to answer a summons by Hornblow, who reacted by giving official notice that production would cease until Howard reported to him. Executive producer William LeBaron subsequently rescinded Hornblow's order, and Howard resumed shooting. Reportedly, a meeting of Paramount executives was called to discuss the recent campaigning of the Screen Directors' Guild for the right of a director to film his picture without front-office ... More Less

This film's working title was Concertina . A news item in HR on 20 Jan 1936 stated that the starting date for the film was postponed for the writing of additional dialogue; the delay caused a change in directors from Harold Young to William K. Howard. At that point, filming was slated to start on 27 Jan, but was delayed until mid-Feb because George Raft, set to star with Lombard, walked off the set at the start of production because he objected to the assignment of Ted Tetzlaff as cameraman.
       As reported in MPH on 14 Mar 1936, Raft was suspended from Paramount for his behavior, and was replaced by Fred MacMurray. Raft returned to the studio for Yours for the Asking (see below). According to a HR news item on 27 Mar 1936, Howard, claiming interference on the set by producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr.'s assistant, Dick Blumenthal , refused to continue shooting unless Blumenthal left the set, which he then did. Later, Howard refused to answer a summons by Hornblow, who reacted by giving official notice that production would cease until Howard reported to him. Executive producer William LeBaron subsequently rescinded Hornblow's order, and Howard resumed shooting. Reportedly, a meeting of Paramount executives was called to discuss the recent campaigning of the Screen Directors' Guild for the right of a director to film his picture without front-office interference. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 May 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 May 36
p. 12.
Film Daily
14 May 36
pp. 4-5.
Film Daily
20 May 36
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 36
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 36
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 36
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 36
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 36
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 36
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
8 May 36
p. 13.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Feb 36
p. 31.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Mar 36
p. 14, 37
Motion Picture Herald
16 May 36
pp. 29-30.
MPSI
1 May 36
p. 22.
New York Times
4 Jun 36
p. 27.
Variety
10 Jun 36
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
Head electrician
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel A Halálkabin by Louis Lucien Rogger (Budapest, 1934)
SONGS
"My Concertina," music and lyrics by Phil Boutelje and Jack Scholl.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Concertina
Release Date:
22 May 1936
Production Date:
mid February--early April 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 May 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6388
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75-76
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
2130
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

The steamship S.S. Mammoth leaves from Havre, France for New York. On board is Princess Olga of Sweden and Gertie, her lady in waiting. Olga, who is really actress Wanda Nash of Brooklyn, has pretended to be a princess to win a movie contract. Due to a mix-up of rooms, Olga meets Joe King Mantell, a famous concertina player, who falls immediately in love with her. Meanwhile, Captain Nicholls receives word that escaped murderer Paul Musko is on board and gathers together five international detectives who are on their way to a convention to help locate him. Musko speaks seven languages and is known to be an actor. As the detectives meet, a mysterious man searches suite B50, belonging to blackmailer Robert M. Darcy, and eavesdrops on the detectives' meeting. Darcy then threatens to expose King's prison record and Wanda's impersonation to Detective Lorel. Although King resists Darcy's threat, Wanda gives him her last £50 and her emerald ring. After Olga dines with King, she discovers Darcy dead in her room. King and his friend, Benton, move Darcy's body to his room and discover that Olga's fifty pounds are missing. When the detectives later search Darcy's room and examine the body, they discover that it was moved from the scene of the crime. They also find Darcy's list of three on-board blackmail targets. The detectives, meanwhile, have deduced that Musko is disguised as passenger Nicholai Petroff, whom no one can locate. Although the detectives believe Musko killed Darcy, when they find a blonde hair on the corpse and King's accordion in Olga's room, they suspect that Olga ... +


The steamship S.S. Mammoth leaves from Havre, France for New York. On board is Princess Olga of Sweden and Gertie, her lady in waiting. Olga, who is really actress Wanda Nash of Brooklyn, has pretended to be a princess to win a movie contract. Due to a mix-up of rooms, Olga meets Joe King Mantell, a famous concertina player, who falls immediately in love with her. Meanwhile, Captain Nicholls receives word that escaped murderer Paul Musko is on board and gathers together five international detectives who are on their way to a convention to help locate him. Musko speaks seven languages and is known to be an actor. As the detectives meet, a mysterious man searches suite B50, belonging to blackmailer Robert M. Darcy, and eavesdrops on the detectives' meeting. Darcy then threatens to expose King's prison record and Wanda's impersonation to Detective Lorel. Although King resists Darcy's threat, Wanda gives him her last £50 and her emerald ring. After Olga dines with King, she discovers Darcy dead in her room. King and his friend, Benton, move Darcy's body to his room and discover that Olga's fifty pounds are missing. When the detectives later search Darcy's room and examine the body, they discover that it was moved from the scene of the crime. They also find Darcy's list of three on-board blackmail targets. The detectives, meanwhile, have deduced that Musko is disguised as passenger Nicholai Petroff, whom no one can locate. Although the detectives believe Musko killed Darcy, when they find a blonde hair on the corpse and King's accordion in Olga's room, they suspect that Olga and King are connected with the murder. King then discovers Benton with Olga's ring, which is engraved "Wanda Nash." After Detective Steindorf finds a stash of passports in room B50, he is murdered. Captain Nicholls then tells Olga she is under suspicion for murder and advises her that he must contact her government. After King promises to announce the killer that night, Wanda confesses her real identity to him. King then receives a murder threat and asks Lorel to protect him. Expecting Benton to cover for him, King waits for the murderer, but Petroff knocks Benton out. Meanwhile, Olga discovers that Lorel has the money she paid Darcy. As King reveals that Musko is actually disguised as Lorel, Petroff arrives and is wounded by Musko. King and Musko then fight until one of the detectives shoots Musko. Petroff reveals himself as a newspaperman who needed a good story and so knocked Benton out so he would not get in the way. In the New York harbor, crowds wait to greet Princess Olga, but Wanda publicly reveals her true identity. Back on board, she swears her love to King, and they kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.