Crime Takes a Holiday (1938)

59 or 61 mins | Drama | 5 October 1938

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HISTORY

The working title for this film was Death Takes a Holiday, although it bears no relation to the 1934 Paramout film of the same title. According to a HR news item, Marcia Ralston replaced Ann Sheridan after Sheridan became ill. The Var review mentions that the film bears a "resemblance to the [1938] New York gubernatorial race between [incumbent Herbert] Lehman and [district attorney Thomas E.] Dewey." ...

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The working title for this film was Death Takes a Holiday, although it bears no relation to the 1934 Paramout film of the same title. According to a HR news item, Marcia Ralston replaced Ann Sheridan after Sheridan became ill. The Var review mentions that the film bears a "resemblance to the [1938] New York gubernatorial race between [incumbent Herbert] Lehman and [district attorney Thomas E.] Dewey."

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
9 May 1938
p. 23
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1938
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 1938
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
20 May 1938
p. 6
Motion Picture Herald
16 Apr 1938
p. 27
Motion Picture Herald
7 May 1938
p. 38
New York Times
28 Nov 1938
p. 11
Variety
7 Dec 1938
p. 12
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Death Takes a Holiday
Release Date:
5 October 1938
Production Date:
23 Mar--4 Apr 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
28 September 1938
LP8311
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
59 or 61
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4253
SYNOPSIS

District Attorney Walter Forbes begins an undercover investigation of the city's racketeers. Forbes's aide, Jerry Clayton, arranges for Walter to be bribed by the racketeers so that he can make contact with their leader, but Forbes' contact, Lt. Lee, is killed before the deal is closed. Ex-convict Homer Stone is quickly convicted of his murder. Walter tells Stone's daughter, Margaret, that he knows Stone is innocent, but he has agreed to the ruse in order to convince the gang that the investigation is over. Publisher J. J. Grant, the head of the racketeers, suspects as much, however, and so Walter sends two policemen to act as racketeers trying to muscle in on Grant's turf. Grant sends his henchmen, Joe, Louie and Pete, to stop the two men, and all five are arrested. In the police line-up, store owners are afraid to identify Grant's men for fear of retaliation. Meanwhile, Governor Bill Allen refuses to sign a stay of execution for Stone. Peggy threatens to take her story to the press unless Walter does something to save her father. Walter then asks her to repeat the scene in front of Howell, Grant's attorney, who has arrived to post bail for the trio of henchmen. Howell relates what Peggy said to Grant, who then has her abducted. Grant, who has been masquerading as the indignant leader of a citizen's reform group, meets with Walter, and inadvertantly reveals knowledge that only the head racketeer would know. On a subsequent visit, Walter plants a bugging device in Grant's telephone. During a conversation, Grant admits his part in Lt. Lee's murder. The confession is broadcast on the ...

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District Attorney Walter Forbes begins an undercover investigation of the city's racketeers. Forbes's aide, Jerry Clayton, arranges for Walter to be bribed by the racketeers so that he can make contact with their leader, but Forbes' contact, Lt. Lee, is killed before the deal is closed. Ex-convict Homer Stone is quickly convicted of his murder. Walter tells Stone's daughter, Margaret, that he knows Stone is innocent, but he has agreed to the ruse in order to convince the gang that the investigation is over. Publisher J. J. Grant, the head of the racketeers, suspects as much, however, and so Walter sends two policemen to act as racketeers trying to muscle in on Grant's turf. Grant sends his henchmen, Joe, Louie and Pete, to stop the two men, and all five are arrested. In the police line-up, store owners are afraid to identify Grant's men for fear of retaliation. Meanwhile, Governor Bill Allen refuses to sign a stay of execution for Stone. Peggy threatens to take her story to the press unless Walter does something to save her father. Walter then asks her to repeat the scene in front of Howell, Grant's attorney, who has arrived to post bail for the trio of henchmen. Howell relates what Peggy said to Grant, who then has her abducted. Grant, who has been masquerading as the indignant leader of a citizen's reform group, meets with Walter, and inadvertantly reveals knowledge that only the head racketeer would know. On a subsequent visit, Walter plants a bugging device in Grant's telephone. During a conversation, Grant admits his part in Lt. Lee's murder. The confession is broadcast on the radio and hearing it, the gangsters release Peggy and leave town in a hurry. Meanwhile, the police arrest Grant. Peggy is reunited with her father and now has Jerry as her beau.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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