Reveille with Beverly (1943)

78 mins | Comedy | 4 February 1943

Director:

Charles Barton

Producer:

Sam White

Cinematographer:

Philip Tannura

Editor:

James Sweeney

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

This picture marked Frank Sinatra's first screen appearance as a solo vocalist without the Tommy Dorsey band. According to a HR news item, Jean Ruth, who worked as the radio advisor on this film, was a Denver broadcaster who served as the real-life model for ... More Less

This picture marked Frank Sinatra's first screen appearance as a solo vocalist without the Tommy Dorsey band. According to a HR news item, Jean Ruth, who worked as the radio advisor on this film, was a Denver broadcaster who served as the real-life model for "Beverly." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 May 1943.
---
Daily Variety
6 May 43
p. 3, 12
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 42
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 43
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Mar 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Feb 43
p. 1162.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Mar 43
p. 1202.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Jun 43
p. 1392.
New York Times
24 Apr 43
p. 17.
Variety
28 Apr 43
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech radio adv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"One O'Clock Jump" by Count Basie.
SONGS
"Big Noise from Winnetka," words and music by Gil Rodin, Robert Haggart, Ray Bauduc and Bob Crosby
"Take the A Train," words and music by Billy Strayhorn
"Night and Day," words and music by Cole Porter
+
SONGS
"Big Noise from Winnetka," words and music by Gil Rodin, Robert Haggart, Ray Bauduc and Bob Crosby
"Take the A Train," words and music by Billy Strayhorn
"Night and Day," words and music by Cole Porter
"Cow Cow Boogie," words and music by Benny Carter, Don Raye and Gene de Paul
"Cielito lindo," traditional
"South Rampart Street Parade," words and music by Steve Allen, Ray Bauduc and Robert Haggart, "Thumbs Up and 'V' for Victory," words and music by Paul Webster and Ted Fio Rito
"Sweet Lucy Brown," words and music by Leon and Otis René.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 February 1943
Production Date:
19 November--9 December 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
4 February 1943
Copyright Number:
LP11858
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
6,997
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Beverly Ross, a switchboard operator at radio station KFEL, aspires to be a boogie-woogie playing disc jockey. One day, when one of the actresses on a dramatic show becomes ill, the director asks Beverly to fill in for her. This gives Beverly an idea, and when Vernon Lewis, the classical announcer of the early morning show, tells Beverly that he is not feeling well, Beverly urges him to take a vacation to recuperate and offers to substitute for him while he is gone. After Beverly takes over the early morning show, her brand of boogie invigorates the soldiers at a nearby army base. While driving to report to duty one day, recruits Barry Lang, a chocolate magnate, and his chauffeur, Andy Adams, hear the program and Barry bets Andy that Beverly is a shriveled-up old hag. In the barracks, Barry and Andy meet Beverly's brother Eddie, who slyly invites them home to settle their bet. When Andy accuses Barry of using his millions to impress women, Barry proposes that they switch identities, with Barry posing as a chauffeur and Andy masquerading as a millionaire. After Eddie is assigned to K.P. duty, Barry and Andy proceed to the Ross home alone and switch identities as planned. When Beverly confides her desire to have her own radio program, Barry suggests that she aim the show at the military troops throughout the country. Inspired by Barry's suggestion, Beverly names her show "Reveille with Beverly" and thanks Barry, who she thinks is Andy, for the idea. Later, after he hears Beverly blasting boogie in the wee morning hours, Mr. Kennedy, the head of the station, fires ... +


Beverly Ross, a switchboard operator at radio station KFEL, aspires to be a boogie-woogie playing disc jockey. One day, when one of the actresses on a dramatic show becomes ill, the director asks Beverly to fill in for her. This gives Beverly an idea, and when Vernon Lewis, the classical announcer of the early morning show, tells Beverly that he is not feeling well, Beverly urges him to take a vacation to recuperate and offers to substitute for him while he is gone. After Beverly takes over the early morning show, her brand of boogie invigorates the soldiers at a nearby army base. While driving to report to duty one day, recruits Barry Lang, a chocolate magnate, and his chauffeur, Andy Adams, hear the program and Barry bets Andy that Beverly is a shriveled-up old hag. In the barracks, Barry and Andy meet Beverly's brother Eddie, who slyly invites them home to settle their bet. When Andy accuses Barry of using his millions to impress women, Barry proposes that they switch identities, with Barry posing as a chauffeur and Andy masquerading as a millionaire. After Eddie is assigned to K.P. duty, Barry and Andy proceed to the Ross home alone and switch identities as planned. When Beverly confides her desire to have her own radio program, Barry suggests that she aim the show at the military troops throughout the country. Inspired by Barry's suggestion, Beverly names her show "Reveille with Beverly" and thanks Barry, who she thinks is Andy, for the idea. Later, after he hears Beverly blasting boogie in the wee morning hours, Mr. Kennedy, the head of the station, fires her, but when fan mail starts pouring in, he quickly rehires her. The vacationing Vernon, meanwhile, hears the broadcast and hurries back to the station to reclaim his show. Vernon's brother-in-law is a big sponsor at the station, and consequently, Kennedy is forced to give him back his time slot. Upon learning of Beverly's predicament, Barry arranges for his chocolate company to sponsor her show. Barry, who has become smitten by Beverly, is about to confess his deception to her when Andy arrives, and Beverly, still thinking that he is Barry, embraces him in gratitude. Soon after, Eddie comes home, and when he describes Andy and Barry, Beverly realizes that she has been fooled. Beverly then decides to broadcast her show from the army base, and Andy and Barry pretend to have the mumps to avoid attending. An officer discovers their ruse, however, and marches them onstage. When Beverly introduces Andy as Barry, the soldiers start to jeer and then straighten out the mix-up. Toward the end of the show, the troops are called to action, and as they march off to duty, Beverly broadcasts a personal message to Andy and Barry, forgiving them for their deception. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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