Expensive Women (1931)

60 or 62-63 mins | Melodrama | 24 October 1931

Director:

Hobart Henley

Cinematographer:

William Rees

Editor:

Desmond O'Brien

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Although Dolores Costello appeared in the 1930 film Second Choice , contemporary sources call this film her come back effort after a two-year absence from the ... More Less

Although Dolores Costello appeared in the 1930 film Second Choice , contemporary sources call this film her come back effort after a two-year absence from the movies. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
15 Nov 31
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
21 Nov 31
p. 49.
New York Times
14 Nov 31
p. 15.
Variety
17 Nov 31
p. 26.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Adpt and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Expensive Women by Wilson Collison (New York, 1931).
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 October 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 September 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2514
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 62-63
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Constance Newton, "Connie" to her friends, yields to the importunings of her friend, Bobby Brandon, and attends a party. She immediately regrets her decision, beating a hasty retreat into the nearest bathroom, where she finds composer Neil Hartley, who is also looking for an escape. After talking for a while, he offers to take her home and cook her a spaghetti dinner. She gladly accepts. Neil falls in love with Connie immediately, persuading her to stay the night. The next morning, Bobby, who has been calling her all night long, tells her he knows where she spent the night. At a party at Neil's country house, Connie is introduced to Arthur Raymond, one of Neil's students. It is love at first sight for both of them, and soon Neil realizes that he has lost Connie to Arthur. After learning that Arthur is married, Connie attempts to end her affair with him, but he stops her, telling her that his marriage was arranged by his father and he never loved his wife. He adds that he will ask for a divorce as soon as his wife returns from Europe, and afterwards he will marry Connie. After the boat docks, however, Arthur's father Melville knocks on Connie's door and tells her that Arthur and his wife are going to reconcile. Apprised by Melville that she is unworthy of Arthur, Connie agrees never to see him again. Trying to forget, she is about to leave for Europe, when Bobby invites her to go with some friends to a series of New Year's Eve parties. Unknowingly, they arrive at the Raymonds'. ... +


Constance Newton, "Connie" to her friends, yields to the importunings of her friend, Bobby Brandon, and attends a party. She immediately regrets her decision, beating a hasty retreat into the nearest bathroom, where she finds composer Neil Hartley, who is also looking for an escape. After talking for a while, he offers to take her home and cook her a spaghetti dinner. She gladly accepts. Neil falls in love with Connie immediately, persuading her to stay the night. The next morning, Bobby, who has been calling her all night long, tells her he knows where she spent the night. At a party at Neil's country house, Connie is introduced to Arthur Raymond, one of Neil's students. It is love at first sight for both of them, and soon Neil realizes that he has lost Connie to Arthur. After learning that Arthur is married, Connie attempts to end her affair with him, but he stops her, telling her that his marriage was arranged by his father and he never loved his wife. He adds that he will ask for a divorce as soon as his wife returns from Europe, and afterwards he will marry Connie. After the boat docks, however, Arthur's father Melville knocks on Connie's door and tells her that Arthur and his wife are going to reconcile. Apprised by Melville that she is unworthy of Arthur, Connie agrees never to see him again. Trying to forget, she is about to leave for Europe, when Bobby invites her to go with some friends to a series of New Year's Eve parties. Unknowingly, they arrive at the Raymonds'. When Arthur sees Connie, he tells her that he loves her and cannot let her go. Bobby walks in on them as they talk and maligns Connie's reputation. Arthur shoots Bobby. Melville comes in after the shooting. He believes that Connie murdered Bobby and insists that she will "pay for it." She says she will tell everyone that Bobby was going to run away with her. Faced with the scandal, Melville agrees to defend her. He convinces the coroner that Bobby committed suicide. Disgusted, Connie returns to Neil and offers to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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