Monster-in-Law (2005)

PG-13 | 101 mins | Comedy | 13 May 2005

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
You may also like these titles from the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, the most authoritative documentation of the First 100 Years of American filmmaking.

Director:

Robert Luketic

Writer:

Anya Kochoff

Cinematographer:

Russell Carpenter

Production Designer:

Missy Stewart

Production Companies:

Benderspink, Spring Creek
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HISTORY

End credits contain the following acknowledgements: “Photograph courtesy of Harpo, Inc./Richard Phibbs; Select pieces provided by Neil Lane Jewelry; Tavaglione Stairs of Gold Tarot deck ©1982 by U.S. Game Systems, Inc., Stamford, CT 06902; Us weekly® is a registered trademark of Us Weekly LLC, All Rights Reserved; Us weekly mock cover used by permission; LA Weekly, LA Weekly Media, Inc.; ©Variety Magazine, owned and published by Cahners, Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier, Inc., All Rights Reserved; Footage from A Nightmare on Elm Street courtesy of New Line Productions, Inc., ©MCMLXXXIV New Line Productions, Inc., All Rights Reserved; News Footage courtesy of LANS; Wrestling footage courtesy of Corbis Motion; Conde Nast Publications.” End credits also include a “personal thanks” to the following individuals and organizations: City of Pasadena Film Office – Ariel Penn, Janet Costner, Kristin Dewey, Naomi Ehara; City of Beverly Hills – Benita Miller; Entertainment Industry Development Corporation – Mike Bobenko, Donna Washington, Jody Strong, Armando Boquerin; Ventury County Film Office – Dan Price, Jarred Rosengren; City of South Pasadena – Joan Aguado; The Huntington Museum & Gardens – Dinah Lehoven; The Alanis Family; The Buzzelli Family; Swarovski; Valentino; Dornbrachi; select artwork provided by Laddie Dill; Yves Delorme; Kate Spade; and Abbey Event Services.
       A 6 Feb 2003 DV news brief reported that New Line Cinema paid $1.3 million for the screenplay by Anya Kochoff, a former executive at Davis Entertainment, after a bidding war with Dimension Films. The sale included a “blind script deal” for Kochoff at New Line, with Benderspink set to produce the resulting screenplay in addition to Monster-in-Law. On 9 Jun 2003, DV announced ... More Less

End credits contain the following acknowledgements: “Photograph courtesy of Harpo, Inc./Richard Phibbs; Select pieces provided by Neil Lane Jewelry; Tavaglione Stairs of Gold Tarot deck ©1982 by U.S. Game Systems, Inc., Stamford, CT 06902; Us weekly® is a registered trademark of Us Weekly LLC, All Rights Reserved; Us weekly mock cover used by permission; LA Weekly, LA Weekly Media, Inc.; ©Variety Magazine, owned and published by Cahners, Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier, Inc., All Rights Reserved; Footage from A Nightmare on Elm Street courtesy of New Line Productions, Inc., ©MCMLXXXIV New Line Productions, Inc., All Rights Reserved; News Footage courtesy of LANS; Wrestling footage courtesy of Corbis Motion; Conde Nast Publications.” End credits also include a “personal thanks” to the following individuals and organizations: City of Pasadena Film Office – Ariel Penn, Janet Costner, Kristin Dewey, Naomi Ehara; City of Beverly Hills – Benita Miller; Entertainment Industry Development Corporation – Mike Bobenko, Donna Washington, Jody Strong, Armando Boquerin; Ventury County Film Office – Dan Price, Jarred Rosengren; City of South Pasadena – Joan Aguado; The Huntington Museum & Gardens – Dinah Lehoven; The Alanis Family; The Buzzelli Family; Swarovski; Valentino; Dornbrachi; select artwork provided by Laddie Dill; Yves Delorme; Kate Spade; and Abbey Event Services.
       A 6 Feb 2003 DV news brief reported that New Line Cinema paid $1.3 million for the screenplay by Anya Kochoff, a former executive at Davis Entertainment, after a bidding war with Dimension Films. The sale included a “blind script deal” for Kochoff at New Line, with Benderspink set to produce the resulting screenplay in addition to Monster-in-Law. On 9 Jun 2003, DV announced that Jennifer Lopez was in negotiations to star in the film. Jane Fonda’s potential involvement was announced in an 18 Jun 2003 DV item, and Robert Luketic was named as director in a 9 Sep 2003 DV brief, which stated that Kochoff was paid “$1.3 million against $2.3 million” for the script.
       Principal photography began 17 May 2004 in Los Angeles, CA, as noted in 11 May 2004 HR production charts.
       Although critical reception was largely negative, the film was deemed a likely box-office success by the 13 May 2005 NYT and 9 May 2005 Var reviews. The film took in $23,105,133 in its opening weekend, according to a 23 May 2005 Var news brief, and an item in the 22 Jun 2005 DV stated that the film’s box-office earnings had risen to $77 million. The home video version was set to be released less than six weeks after the theatrical opening, a “reasonably short window” between theatrical and home video release for a box-office success, according to DV.
       A 9 Feb 2011 HR item reported that Sheri Gilbert, a writer who claimed Monster-in-Law was plagiarized from a screenplay she wrote, was ordered by a Los Angeles, CA, judge to reimburse Warner Bros. for roughly $900,000 in legal fees that the studio incurred from the lawsuit. The case was reportedly “on appeal” at the time of the ruling.
       Monster-in-Law marked Jane Fonda’s return to feature films after a fifteen year hiatus, as noted in the 9 May 2005 Var and 13 May 2005 LAT reviews.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Feb 2003.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jun 2003.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 2003.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 2003
p. 1, 13.
Daily Variety
22 Jun 2005.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 2004.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 2011.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 May 2005
p. 1.
New York Times
13 May 2005
p. 1.
Variety
9 May 2005
p. 47, 54.
Variety
23 May 2005.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Line Cinema presents
a Benderspink production
a Spring Creek production
a Robert Luketic film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
1st asst dir, Addl photog
2d asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
"A" cam op
"A" cam 1st asst
"A" cam 2d asst
"B" cam op
"B" cam 1st asst
"B" cam 2d asst
Steadicam op
Cam loader
Cam prod asst
Still photog
Video assist
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Elec
Dimmer op
Rigging gaffer
Best boy gaffer
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
"A" dolly grip
"B" dolly grip
Rigging key grip
Best boy rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
"B" cam 1st asst, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
High definition dailies & previews by
A Kodak Company
Filmed with remote cranes and heads from
Cam cranes and dollies by
Dollies by
Grip and elec equip furnished by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Graphic des
Art dept coord
Art dept prod asst
Illustrator
Art dept coord, Addl photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Ed prod asst
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Asst set dec
Gang boss
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set dresser
Set dressing prod asst
Set dressing prod asst
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Propmaker purchaser
Gen foreman
Paint foreman
Stage foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Toolman
Gen labor foreman
Plasterer foreman
Staff shop foreman
Scenic artist
Standby painter
Standby painter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Greens coord
Greens foreman
Standby greensman
Painter gangboss
Greensman
Greensman
Prop master, Addl photog
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key set costumer
Key set costumer
Key set costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer for Ms. Lopez
Cutter/Fitter
Cutter/Fitter
Seamstress
Seamstress
Specialty costumer
Cost prod asst
Asst to Ms. Barrett
MUSIC
Mus supv
Exec in charge of mus for New Line
Mus exec
Mus bus affairs exec
Mus bus affairs exec
Mus clearances
Mus ed
Addl mus ed
Mus contractor
Score orch
Score rec at
Score rec and mixed
Score mixed at
Mus preparation by
ProTools eng
Scoring consultant
Scoring sd supv
Mus coord
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableperson
Supv sd ed
Supv sd mixer
Supv sd mixer
ADR supv
ADR supv
Dial supv
Dial ed
Dial ed
Eff ed
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd eff rec
Sd eng
Sd eng
Sd ed provided by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec at
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR rec at
Hollywood
ADR rec at
Atlanta
ADR voice casting
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
ADR voice over cast
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Exec in charge of visual eff
Visual eff exec
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, R!OT Pictures
Lead compositor, R!OT Pictures
Exec prod, R!OT Pictures
Visual eff prod, R!OT Pictures
Visual eff coord, R!OT Pictures
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Digital Dimension
Exec prod, Digital Dimension
Visual eff prod, Digital Dimension
Compositing supv, Digital Dimension
CG supv, Digital Dimension
Visual eff prod by
Visual eff supv, CIS Hollywood
Visual eff prod, CIS Hollywood
Visual eff coord, CIS Hollywood
Sr. paint artist, CIS Hollywood
Paint artist, CIS Hollywood
Main and end titles des by
End titles typography
Opticals by
Addl opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist for Ms. Lopez
Makeup artist for Ms. Fonda
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist for Ms. Lopez
Hairstylist for Ms. Fonda
Key hairstylist, Addl photog
Hairstylist for Ms. Lopez, Addl photog
Hairstylist for Ms. Fonda, Addl photog
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Prod exec
Exec in charge of finance
Exec in charge of post prod
Post prod supv
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Payroll accountant
2d asst accountant
Accounting asst
Post prod accountant
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc scout
Prod controller
Exec in charge of investment
Prod resources
Supv prod coord
Prod attorney
Contract admin
Contract admin
Asst to Mr. Luketic
Asst to Ms. Weinstein
Asst to Ms. Weinstein
Asst to Mr. Bender
Asst to Mr. Flynn
Asst to Ms. Lopez
Asst to Ms. Fonda
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting, Sande Alessi Casting
Extras casting, Sande Alessi Casting
Set medic
Set medic
Security
Security for Ms. Lopez
Security for Ms. Lopez
Catering by
Craft service
Craft service asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation dispatcher
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Picture vehicle coord
Helicopter pilot
Scr supv, Addl photog
Rights & clearances by
Rights & clearances by, Entertainment Clearances,
Rights & clearances by, Entertainment Clearances,
Risk management
Risk management
Prod safety
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Charlie stunt double
Charlie stunt double
Viola stunt double
Viola stunt double
Kevin stunt double
Pop star stunt double
Utility stunts
Utility stunts
Utility stunts
Utility stunts
Stand-in for Ms. Lopez
Stand-in for Ms. Fonda
Stand-in for Mr. Vartan
Stunt coord, Addl photog
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate
Supv digital colorist, EFILM
Digital intermediate supv, EFILM
Digital intermediate ed, EFILM
High definition preview timer
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Sugar Loaf," written by Rick Rossie, performed by the Rick Rossi Jazz Quartet
"Sun Quartet for Strings, Op. 20, No. 6," written by Joseph Haydn, performed by Kodaly String Quartet, courtesy of Naxos, by arrangement with Source/Q
"Tina's Dream II," from A Nightmare on Elm Street, written by Charles Bernstein
+
MUSIC
"Sugar Loaf," written by Rick Rossie, performed by the Rick Rossi Jazz Quartet
"Sun Quartet for Strings, Op. 20, No. 6," written by Joseph Haydn, performed by Kodaly String Quartet, courtesy of Naxos, by arrangement with Source/Q
"Tina's Dream II," from A Nightmare on Elm Street, written by Charles Bernstein
"Cowbells," written by Robert Florence, performed by Bob Florence Trio, courtesy of Fresh Sounds Records
"The Beast," written by Dave Cavanaugh, performed by Mill Buckner, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music
"String Quartet No. 21 in D major, K. 575, 'Prussian No. 1,' Allegretto," written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, performed by Eder Quartet, courtesy of Naxos, by arrangement with Source/Q, appearance by the Rick Rossi String/Flute Trio.
+
SONGS
"Tell Mama," written by Clarence Carter, Marcus Daniel and Wilbur Terrell, performed by Etta James, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Love (Koop Remix)," written by Nancy Joy Kaye and Darryl Swann, performed by Rosey, courtesy of The Island Def Jam Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Everyday Is A Holiday (With You)," written by Esthero and Sean Lennon, performed by Esthero, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
+
SONGS
"Tell Mama," written by Clarence Carter, Marcus Daniel and Wilbur Terrell, performed by Etta James, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Love (Koop Remix)," written by Nancy Joy Kaye and Darryl Swann, performed by Rosey, courtesy of The Island Def Jam Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Everyday Is A Holiday (With You)," written by Esthero and Sean Lennon, performed by Esthero, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
"Into My Soul," written by Filippo Clary, Massimo Bottini and Frencesca Terrenato, performed by Gabin, featuring Dee Dee Bridgewater, courtesy of Astralwerks Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music
"L-L-Love," written by Erica Driscoll and Bruce Driscoll, performed by Astaire, courtesy of Wax Divine Records
"Tour Of Outer Space," written by Thomas Voyce and Simon Rycroft, performed by Rhombus featuring Raashi Malik, courtesy of Festival Mushroom Records/Rhombus Music Limited
"Make Up Bag," written by Savan Kotecha, Andrew Frampton and Wayne Wilkins, performed by Andrew Frampton, Wayne Wilkins and Emma Rhodes, courtesy of Phonogenic
"Just A Ride," written by Jem Griffiths, Mike Caren and Howard Blake, performed by Jem, courtesy of ATO/RCA under arrangement by Zync Music Inc., contains a sample of "An Elephant Called Slowly," performed by Howard Blake
"Down With You," written by Ellie Lawson, Leor Dimant, John O'Brien, Jeff Phillips, Joe Macre and Riek Wilkowski, performed by Ellie Lawson, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing, contains a sample of "Safety In Numbers," performed by Crack in the Sky, courtesy of Lifesong Records, a division of PKM Productions LLC
"Won't U Please B Nice," written by Nellie McKay, performed by Nellie McKay, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony BMG Music Licensing
"Where Happiness Lives," written by Even Johansen, performed by Magnet, courtesy of Filter US Recordings
"1963," written by Rachael Yamagata and Mark Batson, performed by Rachael Yamagata, courtesy of RCA Victor, by arrangement with Sony BMG Music Licensing
"Sweet Adeline," written by Harry Armstrong and Richard Gerard
"Parakeets of Paraguay," written by Cedric Dumont, performed by Frank Chacksfield and His Orchestra, courtesy of Decca Music Group Limited, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"For Once In My Life," written by Orlando Murden and Ron N. Miller, performed by Stevie Wonder, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Don't Wait Too Long," written by Madeleine Peyroux, Jesse Harris and Larry Klein, performed by Madeleine Peyroux, courtesy of Rounder Records, by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 May 2005
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 13 May 2005
Production Date:
began 17 May 2004 in Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
KUMAR Mobiliengesellschaft MbH & Co Projekt NR 1 KG
Copyright Date:
22 July 2005
Copyright Number:
PA1283887
Physical Properties:
Sound
SDDS; Dolby Digital; dts in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Released on Fujifilm
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Countries:
Germany, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
41379
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, Charlie, a free spirit who dabbles in art and fashion design, supports herself by walking dogs and working odd jobs. One day, she notices an attractive man running on the beach and runs into him later at a coffee shop. Charlie tells her friends Remy and Morgan about him, and they tease her about her nonexistent love life. Morgan, a caterer, solicits Charlie and Remy’s help at a private party. While serving appetizers to the guests, Charlie realizes that the man from the beach, Kevin Fields, is the host of the party, and Morgan informs her that Kevin is a surgeon who just moved to L.A. from San Francisco. Carrying a tray of food, Charlie ogles Kevin and is caught eavesdropping on a conversation he is having with his attractive female friend, Fiona. Despite Fiona’s cool dismissal of Charlie, Kevin introduces himself. Hoping to stifle a budding romance, Fiona later tells Charlie that Kevin is a homosexual. When Kevin leaves Charlie a voicemail, asking her out on a date, Charlie does not return his call. However, they run into each other at the beach and Kevin asks her out once again. Confused, Charlie asks if Kevin is homosexual, and he assures her otherwise. When Kevin’s mother calls his pager, he explains that his mother contacts him multiple times a day. Meanwhile, Kevin’s mother, Viola Fields, is fired from her job as a talk show host just before she must film a segment. Holding back tears, Viola loses her temper while interviewing a vapid pop singer and attacks the girl while they are on the air. Months later, Viola is released from a private clinic and ... +


In Los Angeles, California, Charlie, a free spirit who dabbles in art and fashion design, supports herself by walking dogs and working odd jobs. One day, she notices an attractive man running on the beach and runs into him later at a coffee shop. Charlie tells her friends Remy and Morgan about him, and they tease her about her nonexistent love life. Morgan, a caterer, solicits Charlie and Remy’s help at a private party. While serving appetizers to the guests, Charlie realizes that the man from the beach, Kevin Fields, is the host of the party, and Morgan informs her that Kevin is a surgeon who just moved to L.A. from San Francisco. Carrying a tray of food, Charlie ogles Kevin and is caught eavesdropping on a conversation he is having with his attractive female friend, Fiona. Despite Fiona’s cool dismissal of Charlie, Kevin introduces himself. Hoping to stifle a budding romance, Fiona later tells Charlie that Kevin is a homosexual. When Kevin leaves Charlie a voicemail, asking her out on a date, Charlie does not return his call. However, they run into each other at the beach and Kevin asks her out once again. Confused, Charlie asks if Kevin is homosexual, and he assures her otherwise. When Kevin’s mother calls his pager, he explains that his mother contacts him multiple times a day. Meanwhile, Kevin’s mother, Viola Fields, is fired from her job as a talk show host just before she must film a segment. Holding back tears, Viola loses her temper while interviewing a vapid pop singer and attacks the girl while they are on the air. Months later, Viola is released from a private clinic and assures her therapist that she plans to spend time with her son. On the way home, Viola learns from her assistant, Ruby, that Kevin has a new girlfriend. Struggling with the new information, Viola suggests that the relationship cannot be too serious. Back in Los Angeles, Charlie sublets her apartment and moves into Kevin’s home. Before having lunch with Kevin’s mother at her mansion, Charlie views photographs of Viola with various celebrities while awaiting her arrival. Ruby begs Kevin to leave, warning him that Viola is not emotionally stable enough to meet his girlfriend, but Viola finally appears and reluctantly greets Charlie. While drinking tea, Kevin is amazed at how easily Charlie and Viola get along. Kevin surprises Charlie with a marriage proposal, and she happily accepts while Viola fantasizes about shoving the girl’s face into a cake. Viola deduces that Charlie must be pregnant and announces to the couple that marriage is not a viable solution to an unexpected pregnancy. Offended, Kevin denies that Charlie is pregnant. Receiving a message on his pager, Kevin leaves the room to make a call, and Viola tries to convince Charlie that her engagement is too sudden. Later, Viola yells at Ruby in disbelief that her son is going to marry a “temp.” Viola instructs Ruby to investigate Charlie’s past. Sometime later, Viola hosts a lavish engagement party, and provides Charlie and Kevin with black-tie attire when they arrive. While Charlie and Kevin change in separate bedrooms, Viola sends Fiona to Kevin’s room, where she reminds him of their one sexual tryst and attempts to seduce him. Discovering that her dress is too small, Charlie hurries into Kevin’s room but storms out when she sees Fiona kissing her fiancé. Kevin convinces Charlie that Fiona ambushed him and offers to take her home. Soon after, Ruby tells a crying Viola that she cannot find any damning information about Charlie’s past. Deciding that the only way to get rid of Charlie is to drive her crazy, Viola invites Charlie to lunch at a country club and informs her of the elaborate plans she has already made for the wedding and honeymoon. Frustrated, Charlie raises her voice and refuses Viola’s help, prompting Viola to fake a heart attack. At the hospital, Kevin learns from Viola’s physician, Dr. Chamberlain, that his mother might be on the verge of a psychotic breakdown and needs constant supervision. Kevin must leave town on business, so Charlie agrees to take care of Viola. On their first night alone together, Charlie wakes up to the sound of Viola sobbing and tends to her. Viola demands pills and bottled water, then insists that Charlie sleep in bed with her. Pretending to have a nightmare, Viola slaps and yells at her bedmate. The next day at work, Charlie is exhausted. She comes home to find that Viola has cooked dinner, an unappetizing kidney pie that Charlie pretends to like. Under the guise of adding Charlie to her will, Viola interrogates her future daughter-in-law about the status of her citizenship and her willingness to sign a prenuptial agreement. Later, Viola dresses in a strange costume that she claims was a gift from the Dalai Lama and keeps Charlie up all night by chatting incessantly. The next day, while Viola is out, Morgan and Remy visit and Remy discovers a dossier of information about Charlie hidden in Viola’s closet. He opens a bottle of Viola’s anti-anxiety pills and notices they smell like oranges. Charlie gives the pills to a doctor, who determines the pills are simply vitamins. Charlie spies on Viola and Ruby at a restaurant and recognizes their waiter as the man who posed as “Dr. Chamberlain.” Seeking revenge, Charlie replaces Viola’s vitamins with sleeping pills, causing her to pass out with her face buried in a plate of food. When Kevin returns from his trip, he joins Viola and Charlie for a lunch date. Determined to outwit Viola, Charlie asks her to be matron of honor and presents Viola with an unfashionable peach dress to wear at the wedding. Hinting that she knows “Dr. Chamberlain” is a fake, Charlie reveals that she recently dined at the restaurant where he works. When Kevin leaves the table, Charlie demands that Viola move out and stop tormenting her, and Viola complies. At the rehearsal dinner before the wedding, Charlie surprises Viola by inviting “Dr. Chamberlain,” whose real name is Paul, but Viola has invited Fiona, another unwelcome guest. Aware that Charlie is allergic to nuts, Viola crushes almonds into the gravy, and although Ruby convinces her not to serve it, Paul picks up the gravy dish and pours it on Charlie’s meal. Charlie suffers an allergic reaction and cries as her lips swell up. On the morning of her wedding, the bride is happy to discover that her face has returned to normal. To spite Charlie, Viola shows up in Charlie’s dressing room wearing a white gown instead of her peach bridesmaid dress. An argument between the two escalates, and the women slap each other in the face multiple times. A curmudgeonly older woman named Gertrude appears, and Charlie discovers that she is Kevin’s grandmother and Viola’s mother-in-law. Charlie watches as Viola and Gertrude bicker, noting the irony when Gertrude says Viola was too low-class to marry her son. After Gertrude storms out, Charlie tells Viola that their relationship is doomed. Despite her desire to marry Kevin, she cannot bear to fight with Viola for the rest of her life. Charlie finds Kevin before the wedding, but Viola stops her before she calls the wedding off, pulling Charlie aside and begging her to marry her son. Charlie suggests they create boundaries for the future, including a limit to the number of times Viola can call Kevin each day. Viola promises to abstain from child rearing advice unless Charlie asks for it, and is touched when Charlie asks her to spend all holidays and special occasions with them. Viola changes into her peach dress before the wedding ceremony, and after Charlie and Kevin are married, Viola catches Charlie’s bouquet. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.