Men Are Such Fools (1938)

66 or 69-70 mins | Romantic comedy | 16 July 1938

Director:

Busby Berkeley

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

Jack Killifer

Production Designer:

Max Parker

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The novel first appeared in serial form in The Saturday Evening Post (21 Mar--25 Apr 1936). Although the Call Bureau Cast Service lists Ken Niles in the role of the radio announcer, Warner Bros. studio records credit Wendell Niles with the role. ...

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The novel first appeared in serial form in The Saturday Evening Post (21 Mar--25 Apr 1936). Although the Call Bureau Cast Service lists Ken Niles in the role of the radio announcer, Warner Bros. studio records credit Wendell Niles with the role.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
17 Jun 1938
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1937
pp. 14-15
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 1938
pp. 38-39
Motion Picture Daily
18 Apr 1938
p. 4
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jan 1938
pp. 55-56
Motion Picture Herald
23 Apr 1938
p. 44
New York Times
17 Jun 1938
p. 25
Variety
7-Oct-32
---
Variety
22 Jun 1938
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr to trmt
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Men Are Such Fools by Faith Baldwin (New York, 1936).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 July 1938
Production Date:
mid Dec 1937--mid Jan 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
8 March 1938
LP8102
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
66 or 69-70
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4036
SYNOPSIS

New York secretary Linda Lawrence is determined to become a success in the advertising business. She pitches an idea to her boss, Harvey C. Bates, so convincingly that he invites her to dinner at his house to talk further. Linda's fellow worker, Jimmy Hall, who is in love with her, pretends to be a messenger so he can see exactly what is going on at Bates' house. Bates plays matchmaker and sends the two of them to a nightclub as his guests, and by the end of the evening they are in love with each other. Jimmy wants to get married immediately, but Linda, who is now a copywriter, is interested in pursuing her career. Because she is attractive, men in powerful positions are eager to listen to her ideas. The only other woman copywriter, Beatrice Harris, is initially jealous of Linda, but eventually the women become friends. Bea holds a weekend party, where Linda meets Harry Galleon, a radio executive. She flirts with him, hoping to get her ad on the radio, and Jimmy sulks. When Harry's ex-fiancée, Wanda Townsend, pays too much attention to Jimmy, however, Linda is upset. By the end of the weekend, Linda and Jimmy have decided to get married immediately. Linda keeps her job, but when she works late one night, Jimmy insists that she quit. They quarrel, but finally, she agrees to quit and be the "woman behind the man." At first she is happy in her new role, but when Jimmy turns down a better job because he believes it is too risky, Linda is angry at his lack of ambition and ...

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New York secretary Linda Lawrence is determined to become a success in the advertising business. She pitches an idea to her boss, Harvey C. Bates, so convincingly that he invites her to dinner at his house to talk further. Linda's fellow worker, Jimmy Hall, who is in love with her, pretends to be a messenger so he can see exactly what is going on at Bates' house. Bates plays matchmaker and sends the two of them to a nightclub as his guests, and by the end of the evening they are in love with each other. Jimmy wants to get married immediately, but Linda, who is now a copywriter, is interested in pursuing her career. Because she is attractive, men in powerful positions are eager to listen to her ideas. The only other woman copywriter, Beatrice Harris, is initially jealous of Linda, but eventually the women become friends. Bea holds a weekend party, where Linda meets Harry Galleon, a radio executive. She flirts with him, hoping to get her ad on the radio, and Jimmy sulks. When Harry's ex-fiancée, Wanda Townsend, pays too much attention to Jimmy, however, Linda is upset. By the end of the weekend, Linda and Jimmy have decided to get married immediately. Linda keeps her job, but when she works late one night, Jimmy insists that she quit. They quarrel, but finally, she agrees to quit and be the "woman behind the man." At first she is happy in her new role, but when Jimmy turns down a better job because he believes it is too risky, Linda is angry at his lack of ambition and walks out of the marriage to return to work. Stung by her accusations, Jimmy takes the new job and rises rapidly. Although they still love each other, they plan to get divorced. When Jimmy learns that Linda is leaving for Paris with Galleon, he chases after her, stopping her just before she leaves. They make up, and when Galleon arrives on board the ship, he finds Wanda waiting in his stateroom.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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