Riders of the Rio Grande (1943)

55 mins | Western | 21 May 1943

Director:

Howard Bretherton

Writer:

Albert DeMond

Cinematographer:

Ernest Miller

Editor:

Charles Craft

Production Designer:

Russell Kimball

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The opening title card to the film reads "Republic Pictures presents The Three Mesquiteers in Riders of the Rio Grande," followed by pictures of Bob Steele, Tom Tyler and Jimmie Dodd with their names and character names superimposed. Modern sources include John James, Henry Hall and Yakima Canutt in the cast. This was the last entry in The Three Mesquiteers series, which began in 1936. For more information on the series, consult the Series Index and the entry for The Three Mesquiteers (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.4617). ...

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The opening title card to the film reads "Republic Pictures presents The Three Mesquiteers in Riders of the Rio Grande," followed by pictures of Bob Steele, Tom Tyler and Jimmie Dodd with their names and character names superimposed. Modern sources include John James, Henry Hall and Yakima Canutt in the cast. This was the last entry in The Three Mesquiteers series, which began in 1936. For more information on the series, consult the Series Index and the entry for The Three Mesquiteers (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.4617).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Oct 1943
---
Daily Variety
30 Apr 1943
p. 3
Film Daily
15 Oct 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 1943
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 1943
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
26 Feb 1943
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1943
p. 37
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1943
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
15 May 1943
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Apr 1943
p. 1276
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 May 1943
p. 1315
Variety
13 Oct 1943
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by William Colt MacDonald.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"I Got Those Wailin' in the Jailhouse Blues," music and lyrics by Jimmie Dodd.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 May 1943
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 Apr 1943
Production Date:
late Feb--5 Mar 1943
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Republic Pictures Corp.
10 May 1943
LP12088
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
55
Length(in feet):
4,963
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9208
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Timothy "Pop" Owens, the mayor of Owensville and co-owner of the local bank, is continually frustrated in his attempts to discipline his wayward son Tom. Tom currently owes two thousand dollars to gambler and gunman Sam Skelly, who orders him to pay his debt or else. Desperate, Tom takes the money from the bank's vault but is interrupted by Skelly's henchman Berger, who, along with his cohorts cleans out the vault. When Tom protests, they shoot and wound him, and after he goes home, Pop realizes that his son is involved when he learns from the sheriff that blood was found at the scene of the crime. Knowing that he can replace the money only by using a trust fund he has established for Tom and his daughter Janet, Pop makes the bank the beneficiary and then goes to Skelly with an unusual proposition. Pop asks Skelly to hire someone to kill him so that the bank will collect the trust fund and thereby avoid scandal and disaster when the bank examiners arrive in two days. Pleased with a chance to get rid of Pop, Skelly agrees to send the notorious Cherokee boys to kill him. Soon after, as Sarsaparilla, Thumber and Butch Cherokee have a drink in the Owensville bar, they provoke a fight with wandering cowboys "Tucson" Smith, "Stony" Brooke and "Lullaby" Joslin, who are known as The Three Mesquiteers. The Mesquiteers easily best the Cherokees and take possession of their unique guns, which cause the sheriff and townspeople to mistake the Mesquiteers for the outlaws. Taking them to the bank, Pop gives the Mesquiteers orders to kill him, and they ...

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Timothy "Pop" Owens, the mayor of Owensville and co-owner of the local bank, is continually frustrated in his attempts to discipline his wayward son Tom. Tom currently owes two thousand dollars to gambler and gunman Sam Skelly, who orders him to pay his debt or else. Desperate, Tom takes the money from the bank's vault but is interrupted by Skelly's henchman Berger, who, along with his cohorts cleans out the vault. When Tom protests, they shoot and wound him, and after he goes home, Pop realizes that his son is involved when he learns from the sheriff that blood was found at the scene of the crime. Knowing that he can replace the money only by using a trust fund he has established for Tom and his daughter Janet, Pop makes the bank the beneficiary and then goes to Skelly with an unusual proposition. Pop asks Skelly to hire someone to kill him so that the bank will collect the trust fund and thereby avoid scandal and disaster when the bank examiners arrive in two days. Pleased with a chance to get rid of Pop, Skelly agrees to send the notorious Cherokee boys to kill him. Soon after, as Sarsaparilla, Thumber and Butch Cherokee have a drink in the Owensville bar, they provoke a fight with wandering cowboys "Tucson" Smith, "Stony" Brooke and "Lullaby" Joslin, who are known as The Three Mesquiteers. The Mesquiteers easily best the Cherokees and take possession of their unique guns, which cause the sheriff and townspeople to mistake the Mesquiteers for the outlaws. Taking them to the bank, Pop gives the Mesquiteers orders to kill him, and they decide to perpetuate the charade to protect Pop from the real Cherokee boys. Later that afternoon, the Mesquiteers learn of the connection between the Cherokees and Skelly and go to Skelly's saloon, where they see Tom enter Skelly's office. They overhear as Tom accuses Skelly of sending the Cherokees after Pop, then orders him to return the bank's money or else he will go to the sheriff with the whole story, even though he will be implicating himself. Skelly tells Tom that he will return the money but instead arranges for the Cherokees to kill him as he travels back to Owensville. The Mesquiteers save Tom from his pursuers, but are once again mistaken for the outlaws and arrested. Further complications result in Pop telling Tom that he has hired the Cherokees to kill him, and father and son are reconciled when Tom confesses his part in the bank robbery. As they are about to leave home to find the sheriff, Skelly and his men arrive and kidnap them. The Mesquiteers escape from jail after hearing Janet notify the sheriff of the latest events, and find Skelly and his men holding the Owens men captive. After a shootout in the hills, the Mesquiteers are able to capture the bandits and prove their real identities to the sheriff. Pop thanks them for reuniting his family, and the Mesquiteers ride off to join a rodeo.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.