Blind Date (1934)

71-72 or 75 mins | Romance | 20 July 1934

Director:

Roy William Neill

Writer:

Ethel Hill

Cinematographer:

Allen G. Siegler

Editor:

Gene Havlick

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Jul 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Sep 34
p. 4.
International Photographer
1 May 34
p. 16.
Motion Picture Herald
15 Sep 34
p. 65.
New York Times
1 Sep 34
p. 16.
Variety
4 Sep 34
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Props
Gaffer
Welfare worker
Still photog
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stand-in
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Blind Date by Vida Hurst (New York, 1931).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 July 1934
Production Date:
14 May--5 June 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
6 August 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4879
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-72 or 75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
69
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charlie "Pa" Taylor has been unemployed for sixteen months, and his attractive daughter Kitty is supporting the family by working as a switchboard operator. Bill Lowry, a mechanic who is Kitty's fiancé, starts his own garage. When Bill's business takes off, he is forced to break several dates with Kitty, who is resentful of his work, and as a result she agrees to go on a blind date. Her date turns out to be Bob Hartwell, son of a department store magnate. The couple take a fancy to one another and Bob gets Kitty a job as a model for his father's stores. During one of their dates, Bob's car breaks down and the chauffeur calls Bill's garage to make the repair. Bill and Bob argue and Bill punches Bob before he leaves in a huff. Bob's father, J. W. Hartwell, is anxious to end Bob's affair with Kitty, so he sends Bob away and then fires Kitty. Without any income, the Taylors fall on hard times. When Bill learns of their hardship, he offers Pa a job. Ma convinces Kitty to go back to Bill since he has helped the family so much, in spite of the fact that she no longer loves him. At sea, Bob realizes that he loves Kitty and wins his mother's consent to marry her. Pa is responsible for an accident at the garage that sends Bill to the hospital, and once again, the Taylors are placed in financial straits. Kitty enters a dance marathon to win the cash prize, and after dancing for days, collapses on the dance floor. As she ... +


Charlie "Pa" Taylor has been unemployed for sixteen months, and his attractive daughter Kitty is supporting the family by working as a switchboard operator. Bill Lowry, a mechanic who is Kitty's fiancé, starts his own garage. When Bill's business takes off, he is forced to break several dates with Kitty, who is resentful of his work, and as a result she agrees to go on a blind date. Her date turns out to be Bob Hartwell, son of a department store magnate. The couple take a fancy to one another and Bob gets Kitty a job as a model for his father's stores. During one of their dates, Bob's car breaks down and the chauffeur calls Bill's garage to make the repair. Bill and Bob argue and Bill punches Bob before he leaves in a huff. Bob's father, J. W. Hartwell, is anxious to end Bob's affair with Kitty, so he sends Bob away and then fires Kitty. Without any income, the Taylors fall on hard times. When Bill learns of their hardship, he offers Pa a job. Ma convinces Kitty to go back to Bill since he has helped the family so much, in spite of the fact that she no longer loves him. At sea, Bob realizes that he loves Kitty and wins his mother's consent to marry her. Pa is responsible for an accident at the garage that sends Bill to the hospital, and once again, the Taylors are placed in financial straits. Kitty enters a dance marathon to win the cash prize, and after dancing for days, collapses on the dance floor. As she is carried out, Bob arrives and asks her to marry him. Kitty forgives Bob for his earlier behavior, but rejects his marriage proposal since she feels obligated to Bill. After a tearful farewell with Kitty, Bob leaves for Europe, but he insures Kitty's future by anonymously buying Bill's garage lease for $10,000. After Bill learns that Kitty really loves Bob, he precipitates an argument by asking her to to delay the wedding. Bill and Kitty break up for good, and Kitty runs to the pier to catch the ocean liner, where she is reunited with Bob. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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