Hands Across the Table (1935)

80 or 85 mins | Romantic comedy | 18 October 1935

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HISTORY

The plot synopsis in the pressbook ends with the coin landing "heads up," indicating that Ted and Regi will marry first. A pre-release article in HR notes that Viña Delmar originally optioned her story under the title "Hands Across the Table" to Samuel Goldwyn, who intended it as a Miriam Hopkins vehicle, however, he allowed his option to lapse. When she sold it to Paramount, she changed the name to Bracelets , the film's early working title. A DV news item notes that Gary Cooper was originally intended for the lead, however, was unable to take the part due to his commitment to Paramount's Peter Ibbetson . Modern sources frequently cite this film as Carole Lombard's first "screwball" comedy, and that it was overseen by Ernst Lubitsch, managing director of production at Paramount at the time. HR production charts include Russell Hopton in the cast. Jack Kirkland was given screenplay credits in early publicity records. The cat Whitie, was owned by Henry East and trained by Rudd Weatherwax. Modern sources note that dress fittings included Edith Head; that Lombard was originally to be given sole star billing, but MacMurray was given co-star status; and that Ray Milland was originally intended for the part of ... More Less

The plot synopsis in the pressbook ends with the coin landing "heads up," indicating that Ted and Regi will marry first. A pre-release article in HR notes that Viña Delmar originally optioned her story under the title "Hands Across the Table" to Samuel Goldwyn, who intended it as a Miriam Hopkins vehicle, however, he allowed his option to lapse. When she sold it to Paramount, she changed the name to Bracelets , the film's early working title. A DV news item notes that Gary Cooper was originally intended for the lead, however, was unable to take the part due to his commitment to Paramount's Peter Ibbetson . Modern sources frequently cite this film as Carole Lombard's first "screwball" comedy, and that it was overseen by Ernst Lubitsch, managing director of production at Paramount at the time. HR production charts include Russell Hopton in the cast. Jack Kirkland was given screenplay credits in early publicity records. The cat Whitie, was owned by Henry East and trained by Rudd Weatherwax. Modern sources note that dress fittings included Edith Head; that Lombard was originally to be given sole star billing, but MacMurray was given co-star status; and that Ray Milland was originally intended for the part of Ted. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Jun 35
p. 2.
Film Daily
25 Oct 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 35
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
7 Oct 35
p. 12.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Sep 35
p. 51.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Oct 1935
p. 83.
New York Times
2 Nov 35
p. 13.
Variety
6 Nov 35
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Contr to dial
Contr to dial
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Furnishings by
COSTUMES
Carole Lombard's clothes des by
PRODUCTION MISC
Whitie's owner
Whitie's trainer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hands Across the Table," music and lyrics by Mitchell Parish and Jean Delettre
"The Morning After," music and lyrics by Sam Coslow.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Bracelets
Release Date:
18 October 1935
Production Date:
began early August 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 October 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5885
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 85
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1464
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Regi Allen, a New York manicurist who was reared in poverty, is determined to marry a wealthy man. She becomes the favorite manicurist of Savoy-Carleton Hotel client Allen Macklyn, a former aviator now confined to a wheelchair because of a flying accident. Regi soon becomes the only bright spot in Allen's life, but he never tells her that he has fallen in love with her. Meanwhile, Regi meets Theodore Drew III, the nutty scion of a wealthy family that lost all their money in the 1929 stockmarket crash. Ted and Regi go out on a date and he becomes drunk, and she does not learn until later that evening that he is engaged to marry Vivian Snowden, the daughter of the "pineapple king." Unable to awaken Ted from his drunken stupor, Regi allows him to sleep on her couch that night, but finds him still there when she returns home after work the next day. Ted has missed a boat sailing for Bermuda, on which his future father-in-law had bought him a berth to keep him out of the way until the wedding. Regi allows him to stay with her, because he has no money, and they slowly fall in love, despite the fact that both are determined to marry for money. To maintain his good favor with his fiancée, Ted calls Vivian, while Regi pretends to be a Bermuda telephone operator. She interrupts so many times that she and Ted have to hang up because they are laughing so hard. When Vivian tries to get the Bermuda operator back, she finds out that the call was from New York. ... +


Regi Allen, a New York manicurist who was reared in poverty, is determined to marry a wealthy man. She becomes the favorite manicurist of Savoy-Carleton Hotel client Allen Macklyn, a former aviator now confined to a wheelchair because of a flying accident. Regi soon becomes the only bright spot in Allen's life, but he never tells her that he has fallen in love with her. Meanwhile, Regi meets Theodore Drew III, the nutty scion of a wealthy family that lost all their money in the 1929 stockmarket crash. Ted and Regi go out on a date and he becomes drunk, and she does not learn until later that evening that he is engaged to marry Vivian Snowden, the daughter of the "pineapple king." Unable to awaken Ted from his drunken stupor, Regi allows him to sleep on her couch that night, but finds him still there when she returns home after work the next day. Ted has missed a boat sailing for Bermuda, on which his future father-in-law had bought him a berth to keep him out of the way until the wedding. Regi allows him to stay with her, because he has no money, and they slowly fall in love, despite the fact that both are determined to marry for money. To maintain his good favor with his fiancée, Ted calls Vivian, while Regi pretends to be a Bermuda telephone operator. She interrupts so many times that she and Ted have to hang up because they are laughing so hard. When Vivian tries to get the Bermuda operator back, she finds out that the call was from New York. Finally, Ted and Regi have their last night together and, although they both admit they are in love, Regi insists that unless Ted marries for money, he will hate her within six months. After having private detectives determine the identity of Ted's girl friend, Vivian books a room at the Savoy-Carleton Hotel, and asks to see Regi. Unimpressed with her, Vivian decides to take Ted back. He, however, finally realizes how much he loves Regi when he decides he would be willing to get a job and marry her, rather than live in luxury with Vivian. Vivian releases him from their engagement, and he rushes to Allen's apartment, where Regi has just been sobbing. Allen leaves to allow Regi and Ted to talk, even though he had bought an engagement ring and was planning to propose to Regi. He is happy for her, however, and she and Ted make up and decide to marry that day. On the top of a doubledecker bus, they toss a coin to see if they will first eat lunch or marry. Ted flippantly remarks that if the coin lands on edge, he will get a job. The coin falls off the bus entirely, so they stop the bus and run through traffic to retrieve it. The coin has landed on its edge, and they kiss, oblivious to the traffic jamming up behind them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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