Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Greetings and Greetings Friends . Correspondence between the Disney Studio and the United States government indicates that in some areas of South America it was shown under the title Saludos , which was the title under which the Dec 1942 Var review from Buenos Aires appeared. After the onscreen credits, a written acknowledgment, signed by Walt Disney, reads: "With sincere appreciation for the courtesy and cooperation shown us by the artists, musicians and our many friends in Latin America." The surname of background painter Claude Coats is misspelled "Coates" in the screen credits.
       The following information comes from HR and other contemporary news items, studio records preserved in the Walt Disney Archives and material in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library: In 1941, at the request of the U.S. State Department, Walt Disney and a group of his staff members made a goodwill tour of South America. Their visit was undertaken for two reasons: to support the government's "Good Neighbor" program (designed to strengthen the bonds between North and South America), and to gather material for a series of films. As noted in the Var review, the film was "suggested by, and has the blessing of, Nelson Rockefeller's Office of Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs." The party of eighteen included Walt Disney and his wife Lillian, production supervisor Norm Ferguson, musical director Charles Wolcott, animator Frank Thomas and members of the Disney story department. The group arrived in Rio de Janeiro in Aug 1941, and enjoyed lengthy stays there and in Buenos Aires before splitting up into smaller ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Greetings and Greetings Friends . Correspondence between the Disney Studio and the United States government indicates that in some areas of South America it was shown under the title Saludos , which was the title under which the Dec 1942 Var review from Buenos Aires appeared. After the onscreen credits, a written acknowledgment, signed by Walt Disney, reads: "With sincere appreciation for the courtesy and cooperation shown us by the artists, musicians and our many friends in Latin America." The surname of background painter Claude Coats is misspelled "Coates" in the screen credits.
       The following information comes from HR and other contemporary news items, studio records preserved in the Walt Disney Archives and material in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library: In 1941, at the request of the U.S. State Department, Walt Disney and a group of his staff members made a goodwill tour of South America. Their visit was undertaken for two reasons: to support the government's "Good Neighbor" program (designed to strengthen the bonds between North and South America), and to gather material for a series of films. As noted in the Var review, the film was "suggested by, and has the blessing of, Nelson Rockefeller's Office of Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs." The party of eighteen included Walt Disney and his wife Lillian, production supervisor Norm Ferguson, musical director Charles Wolcott, animator Frank Thomas and members of the Disney story department. The group arrived in Rio de Janeiro in Aug 1941, and enjoyed lengthy stays there and in Buenos Aires before splitting up into smaller groups to visit Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Chile. During this time the artists made numerous sketches and paintings. Walt Disney and two other members of the party, Lee Blair and Larry Lansburgh, brought along 16mm cameras to record their impressions of South America. Some of this 16mm color film was later blown up to 35mm for exhibition in Saludos Amigos . The group returned to the Disney studio in California in late Oct 1941, and began work on production of their projected series of films.
       Orginially Disney had agreed that his studio would produce a series of one-reel cartoons based on the South American trip. These were to be released in groups of four. The first four were registered with the MPAA by Jun 1942, but subsequently Disney decided to combine the four shorts into a single feature. HR announced this change in Jun 1942, but internal evidence in studio memos suggests that the decision had been made in Apr or May. In a 16 Jun 1942 memo to the MPAA, the studio stated that the four shorts "will be released in this country as shorts but...will be shown as a feature in South America," and concurrent trade press coverage made the same suggestion. The plan was dropped, however, and the film was shown as a feature in both North and South America. Some of the 16mm footage shot by the Disney group in South America was edited to serve as a linking device, unifying the four disparate segments into one feature-length film. At the same time, other parts of the travel footage were assembled as a half-hour "documentary" for 16mm non-theatrical distribution in the United States. This short was variously known by the working titles Walt Disney Visits South America and Walt Disney Sees Latin America , but was finally given the title South of the Border with Disney .
       The "Pedro" segment of Saludos amigos was based on a story developed independently of the "Good Neighbor" tour. Joe Grant and Dick Huemer wrote a story about a little humanized airplane named "Petey O'Toole" after the characters emblazoned on his wings: P-T 0-2-L. This original story was revised and combined with the experiences of some of the South American tour group, flying across the Andes from Argentina to Chile, to produce "Pedro." The end of the segment features a closeup of a postcard addressed to "Jorge Delano" in Santiago, Chile, which was the name of the group's guide and interpreter when they visited Santiago.
       One of the stops made in South America by the Disney party was a visit to the studio of the Argentine gaucho artist F. Molina Campos. After the tour group returned to the United States, a HR new item noted that Campos visited the Disney studio. He was subsequently given screen credit in the film, as noted above. Studio documents indicate that there was a tentative plan to have Campos provide narration for some of the segments, but the idea was abandoned. According to the film's pressbook, Gilberto Souto, who also received screen credit, was a "Brazilian newspaperman currently living in Hollywood," who was recruited as a technical advisor. The pressbook also claims that "A Paulista, Senhorita Ferrer, also visiting in Hollywood at the time of production," danced the samba many times for the artists. According to a Jul 1942 HR news item, Carmen Miranda was given a two-day leave of absence from the set of Twentieth Century-Fox production Springtime in the Rockies to serve as a technical advisor. According to the Var review, Alberto Soria was the narrator of the Spanish-language version of the film. Modern sources add Frank Graham ( Narrator ) to the cast.
       The world premiere of Saludos amigos was held on 24 Aug 1942 in Rio de Janeiro. The premiere featured the Portuguese-language version of the film, titled Alo amigos , which opened simultaneously in five different theaters. The Spanish-language version opened in Buenos Aires on 6 Oct 1942. HR items indicate that both the Brazilian and Argentine premieres were sponsored by the wives of the presidents of the respective countries. Numerous contemporary sources commented on the film's extraordinary popularity in South America, and a 7 Feb 1943 NYT article reported that "Donald [Duck] is currently causing audience stampedes on the Pampas despite an early and abruptly silenced gibe by a pro-German sheet in Buenos Aires." The official North American opening of the English-language version was held on 6 Feb 1943 in Boston, and was preceded by numerous special previews and private showings. These included a screening at the National Archives (NARS) in Washington, D.C. in Oct 1942, and a "preview party" at the United Artists building in New York later the same month. Promotional items for the film included a record album of its music, conducted by Charles Wolcott, and a "José Carioca" Sunday comic page featuring the character introduced in the "Aquarela do Brasil" segment of the feature. The film's publicity gave the character's first name interchangeably as "Joe" and "José."
       Saludos amigos received Academy Award nominations for Best Sound Recording and Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, and Charles Wolcott and Ned Washington received an Academy Award nomination for Best Song for "Saludos amigos." The four segments used in Saludos amigos were only a few of the many story ideas developed from the studio's Latin American material. Many other story ideas were contemplated but never used, and at least two, "Pluto and the Armadillo" and "The Pelican and the Snipe," were completed and released separately as shorts. Two other stories, "The Flying Gauchito" and "The Cold-Blooded Penguin," were completed around the same time as the four segments used in Saludos amigos , but were held back and integrated into the next "Good Neighbor" feature, The Three Caballeros (see below). One final segment, "Blame It on the Samba," was ultimately used in the 1948 "package feature" Melody Time More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19-Dec-42
---
Daily Variety
15 Dec 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Dec 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 41
p. 1, 4
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jan 42
pp. 1-2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
8 May 42
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 44
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 46
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Dec 42
p. 1065.
New York Daily News
13 Feb 43
p. 20.
New York Times
26 Oct 1941.
---
New York Times
7 Feb 1943.
---
New York Times
13 Feb 43
p. 8.
New Yorker
13 Feb 43
p. 41.
Newsweek
25 Jan 43
pp. 76-77.
Reel News
1 Jun 42
p. 8.
Time
25 Jan 43
p. 86.
Variety
9 Dec 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Seq dir
Seq dir
Seq dir
PRODUCERS
Prod supv
WRITERS
Story research
Story research
Story research
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
16mm loc photog
16mm loc photog
16mm loc photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art supv
Art supv
Art supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Foreign supv
Tech adv
ANIMATION
Anim
Anim
Anim
Anim
Anim
Anim
Backgrounds "El Gaucho Goofy" inspired by
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Anim
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Tico-tico, no fubá" music by Zequínha de Abreu.
SONGS
"Saludos amigos," music by Charles Wolcott, lyrics by Ned Washington
"Aquarela do Brasil," music and Portuguese lyrics by Ary Barroso, sung by Aloysio Oliveira.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Greetings, Friends
Alo, amigos
Release Date:
19 February 1943
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Rio de Januaryeiro, Brazil: 24 August 1942
Boston opening: 6 February 1943
Production Date:
late October 1941--mid June 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Walt Disney Productions
Copyright Date:
9 July 1942
Copyright Number:
LP12268
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
42-43 or 45
Length(in feet):
3,776
Length(in reels):
4
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8092
SYNOPSIS

A group of artists, writers and musicians working for the Walt Disney Studio leave Hollywood and board an airplane bound for South America, where they visit Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Peru. Sketching and photographing as they go, the artists tour the cities, visit the studio of painter F. Molina Campos, and watch the gauchos at work on the pampas. Their impressions of these countries with their colorful customs and interesting people inspire them to produce a series of four animated films, which are then shown: In "Lake Titicaca," Donald Duck appears as a North American tourist visiting the lake region. He sees a market and a bakery, photographs the local residents and has an encounter with a cantankerous llama, which he then rides across a precarious suspension bridge high above a chasm. His fall from the bridge lands him in a pottery market, then into the lake itself. The next cartoon, "Pedro," concerns a young mail plane who must prove himself by flying the mail from Argentina to Chile. To do this he must negotiate the dangerous Andes, and in particular must avoid Aconcagua, the tallest mountain peak in the Western Hemisphere. After stopping to play, Pedro is driven off course by inclement weather and runs out of gas. Although he is feared lost, Pedro finally arrives with his load of mail, which proves to contain only one postcard. In "El Gaucho Goofy," the third cartoon, Goofy is transported from North America to Argentina, where his North American cowboy clothes are exchanged for those of an Argentine gaucho. With the dubious help of his horse, Goofy attempts to demonstrate authentic gaucho ... +


A group of artists, writers and musicians working for the Walt Disney Studio leave Hollywood and board an airplane bound for South America, where they visit Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Peru. Sketching and photographing as they go, the artists tour the cities, visit the studio of painter F. Molina Campos, and watch the gauchos at work on the pampas. Their impressions of these countries with their colorful customs and interesting people inspire them to produce a series of four animated films, which are then shown: In "Lake Titicaca," Donald Duck appears as a North American tourist visiting the lake region. He sees a market and a bakery, photographs the local residents and has an encounter with a cantankerous llama, which he then rides across a precarious suspension bridge high above a chasm. His fall from the bridge lands him in a pottery market, then into the lake itself. The next cartoon, "Pedro," concerns a young mail plane who must prove himself by flying the mail from Argentina to Chile. To do this he must negotiate the dangerous Andes, and in particular must avoid Aconcagua, the tallest mountain peak in the Western Hemisphere. After stopping to play, Pedro is driven off course by inclement weather and runs out of gas. Although he is feared lost, Pedro finally arrives with his load of mail, which proves to contain only one postcard. In "El Gaucho Goofy," the third cartoon, Goofy is transported from North America to Argentina, where his North American cowboy clothes are exchanged for those of an Argentine gaucho. With the dubious help of his horse, Goofy attempts to demonstrate authentic gaucho customs and dances. Then, "Aquarela do Brasil" illustrates the popular song of the same name with a series of abstract musical impressions of the sights and sounds of Rio de Janeiro. One exotic flower transforms into Donald Duck, who is then introduced to a Brazilian parrot named Joe Carioca. Joe enthusiastically welcomes his famous visitor and teaches him to dance the samba. The film ends with the whole city of Rio swaying to the beat of the samba. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.