Jewel Robbery (1932)

63,68 or 70 mins | Romance | 13 August 1932

Director:

William Dieterle

Writer:

Erwin Gelsey

Cinematographer:

Robert Kurrle

Editor:

Ralph Dawson

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

NYT erroneously credits C. Henry Gordon with the role of "Fritz," which was played by Alan Mowbray. Some sources credit Robert Greig with the role of "the Concierge" and Charles Coleman with the role of "Henri." ...

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NYT erroneously credits C. Henry Gordon with the role of "Fritz," which was played by Alan Mowbray. Some sources credit Robert Greig with the role of "the Concierge" and Charles Coleman with the role of "Henri."

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
23 Jul 1932
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
11 Jun 1932
pp. 30-31
New York Times
23 Jul 1932
p. 6
Variety
26 Jul 1932
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Assoc dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Ekszerrablás a Váci-uccában by Lázló Fodor (copyrighted 26 Aug 1931) and the English-language adaptation, The Jewel Robbery , by Bertram Bloch (New York, 13 Dec 1931).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 August 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
8 July 1932
LP3134
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63,68 or 70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The Baroness Teri has a wealthy husband who indulges her, but she is bored by him and by her lovers and longs for some excitement. She meets her husband, the Baron at an exclusive Viennese jewelry store where he has promised to buy her a twenty-eight carat diamond ring. Just as he manages to buy the ring for a good price, a sophisticated, well-dressed robber breaks into the store. As his men proceed to empty the cases and relieve the customers of their jewelry, the robber carries on a flirtatious conversation with Teri. She is charmed, and when the robber offers the customers a choice between being locked in the safe or smoking a drugged cigarette, she declines either option, protesting that she has no desire to see him arrested. When she arrives home, she finds her bedroom filled with roses and her diamond ring in the safe. Soon she discovers that the robber has accompanied the flowers. She begs him to take back her ring in order to save her reputation, explaining that she will not be able to wear it without telling how she got it back. While they talk, a policeman arrives, having trailed a suspicious character to her house. He finds the ring and the other stolen jewels in her safe and starts to arrest her, but the robber steps out from his hiding place to save her. The policeman takes them both along, but to Teri's surprise, they do not go to the police station but to the robber's apartment. The man she supposed to be a policeman is actually one of the robber's men. ...

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The Baroness Teri has a wealthy husband who indulges her, but she is bored by him and by her lovers and longs for some excitement. She meets her husband, the Baron at an exclusive Viennese jewelry store where he has promised to buy her a twenty-eight carat diamond ring. Just as he manages to buy the ring for a good price, a sophisticated, well-dressed robber breaks into the store. As his men proceed to empty the cases and relieve the customers of their jewelry, the robber carries on a flirtatious conversation with Teri. She is charmed, and when the robber offers the customers a choice between being locked in the safe or smoking a drugged cigarette, she declines either option, protesting that she has no desire to see him arrested. When she arrives home, she finds her bedroom filled with roses and her diamond ring in the safe. Soon she discovers that the robber has accompanied the flowers. She begs him to take back her ring in order to save her reputation, explaining that she will not be able to wear it without telling how she got it back. While they talk, a policeman arrives, having trailed a suspicious character to her house. He finds the ring and the other stolen jewels in her safe and starts to arrest her, but the robber steps out from his hiding place to save her. The policeman takes them both along, but to Teri's surprise, they do not go to the police station but to the robber's apartment. The man she supposed to be a policeman is actually one of the robber's men. The robber asks her to come away to Nice with him. She agrees to meet him, but before she can leave, the real police arrive. The robber ties her up in order to save her reputation before he escapes over the roof. When she is released from her bonds, she announces that she needs to restore her nerves by a vacation in Nice, where she intends to meet the robber.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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