Hard to Get (1938)

78 or 80 mins | Romantic comedy | 5 November 1938

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HISTORY

The film's working titles were Head over Heels , Hot Heiress and For Lovers Only ... More Less

The film's working titles were Head over Heels , Hot Heiress and For Lovers Only . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 Nov 38
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 38
pp. 10-11.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 38
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
20 Oct 38
p. 9.
Motion Picture Herald
9 Jul 38
p. 25.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Nov 38
p. 35.
New York Times
14 Nov 38
p. 15.
Variety
9 Nov 38
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Stuffed Shirt" by Stephen Morehouse Avery in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (8 Oct 1932).
SONGS
"There's a Sunny Side to Every Situation" and "You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby," music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Johnny Mercer.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
For Lovers Only
Hot Heiress
Head over Heels
Release Date:
5 November 1938
Production Date:
early June--mid July 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 October 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8382
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78 or 80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4406
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Margaret Richards, the willful daughter of oil magnate Ben Richards, storms out of the house when her family insists that she accompany them to Newport for the summer. Taking the car belonging to her father's valet, she is peeved to discover that it is low on gas and pulls into the nearest gas station. After the attendant, Bill Davis, fills the tank, Margaret tries to charge the gas to her father's account. Because he does not know who she is, Bill refuses her demands, offering to let her work off her debt by making the beds in the attached motel. Margaret is outraged by this suggestion but eventually is forced to comply. She vows revenge on Bill for this insult, asking her father, who is on the board of the oil company that owns the station, to have Bill fired. When her father hears the story, he agrees with Bill's actions and suggests that she get even by herself. In the meantime, Richards busily makes bets with his valet about his proficiency in various sports. Now pretending to be her family's maid, Margaret returns to the station and apologizes. She makes a date with Bill, who tells her that he needs financial support for his plan for a chain of auto courts. Margaret sees her opportunity and sends him to see her father. Richards, in turn, sends Bill over to see his friend, Atwater. When Atwater will not listen to Bill's proposal, Bill returns to Richards, who finally discovers that Margaret is behind the whole thing. After Bill learns that Margaret has been lying about her ... +


Margaret Richards, the willful daughter of oil magnate Ben Richards, storms out of the house when her family insists that she accompany them to Newport for the summer. Taking the car belonging to her father's valet, she is peeved to discover that it is low on gas and pulls into the nearest gas station. After the attendant, Bill Davis, fills the tank, Margaret tries to charge the gas to her father's account. Because he does not know who she is, Bill refuses her demands, offering to let her work off her debt by making the beds in the attached motel. Margaret is outraged by this suggestion but eventually is forced to comply. She vows revenge on Bill for this insult, asking her father, who is on the board of the oil company that owns the station, to have Bill fired. When her father hears the story, he agrees with Bill's actions and suggests that she get even by herself. In the meantime, Richards busily makes bets with his valet about his proficiency in various sports. Now pretending to be her family's maid, Margaret returns to the station and apologizes. She makes a date with Bill, who tells her that he needs financial support for his plan for a chain of auto courts. Margaret sees her opportunity and sends him to see her father. Richards, in turn, sends Bill over to see his friend, Atwater. When Atwater will not listen to Bill's proposal, Bill returns to Richards, who finally discovers that Margaret is behind the whole thing. After Bill learns that Margaret has been lying about her identity, he angrily lectures her, her father and Atwater. Once Bill is gone, Atwater and Richards decide that he had a good idea after all and fight over the plans. Eventually they agree to be partners and pay Bill a big fee to act as the architect. Margaret and Bill marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.