Dr. Kildare's Crisis (1940)

70, 73 or 75 mins | Comedy-drama | 29 November 1940

Director:

Harold S. Bucquet

Cinematographer:

John F. Seitz

Editor:

Gene Ruggiero

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title for this film was Should Dr. Kildare Tell? The picture was the seventh in the Dr. Kildare series. A NYT news item notes that although director Harold S. Bucquet's first choice for the role of Dr. Gillespie was series regular Lionel Barrymore, because Barrymore was ill at the time, the studio refused to let him work.
       The MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library contains a letter from the A. W. Rudnick, Secretary of the National Creamery and Buttermaker's Association, to MPPDA President Will H. Hays, in which Rudnick complained that the film shows "people drinking milk and make[s] it appear that milk drinking is an object of ridicule." He went on to point out "I have failed to see a single movie where a young man or a young woman or an old man or an old woman has asked for milk when attending a cocktail party or gathering of any kind...The dairyman who sells fluid milk gets a higher income than any of the farmers and when the farmer has money he goes to the movies. He is a better customer of yours than the distillery employee or the coffee or tea dealer." Hays personally responded by assuring Rudnick that "there is no intention on the part of the organized industry to ridicule milk drinking." Furthermore, Hays informed Rudnick that he had noticed that in studio's dining rooms a large number of people were drinking milk daily. In 1941, the PCA received another letter of protest relating to the film, this time from the Medical Society of New York, which objected to the way ... More Less

The working title for this film was Should Dr. Kildare Tell? The picture was the seventh in the Dr. Kildare series. A NYT news item notes that although director Harold S. Bucquet's first choice for the role of Dr. Gillespie was series regular Lionel Barrymore, because Barrymore was ill at the time, the studio refused to let him work.
       The MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library contains a letter from the A. W. Rudnick, Secretary of the National Creamery and Buttermaker's Association, to MPPDA President Will H. Hays, in which Rudnick complained that the film shows "people drinking milk and make[s] it appear that milk drinking is an object of ridicule." He went on to point out "I have failed to see a single movie where a young man or a young woman or an old man or an old woman has asked for milk when attending a cocktail party or gathering of any kind...The dairyman who sells fluid milk gets a higher income than any of the farmers and when the farmer has money he goes to the movies. He is a better customer of yours than the distillery employee or the coffee or tea dealer." Hays personally responded by assuring Rudnick that "there is no intention on the part of the organized industry to ridicule milk drinking." Furthermore, Hays informed Rudnick that he had noticed that in studio's dining rooms a large number of people were drinking milk daily. In 1941, the PCA received another letter of protest relating to the film, this time from the Medical Society of New York, which objected to the way in which epilepsy was presented in the film. The Society took issue with statements in the film claiming that "epilepsy is inherited, that epilepsy is curable, and that epilepsy progresses into insanity." For more information on the Dr. Kildare series, See Entry for Young Dr. Kildare . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Nov 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Dec 40
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 40
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 40
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Nov 40
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
30 Nov 40
p. 36.
New York Times
19 Dec 40
p. 33.
Variety
4 Dec 40
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Max Brand.
AUTHOR
SONGS
"On the Banks of the Wabash Far Away," music and lyrics by Paul Dresser.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Should Dr. Kildare Tell?
Release Date:
29 November 1940
Production Date:
5 September--2 October 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 November 1940
Copyright Number:
LP10098
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70, 73 or 75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6767
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

As young doctor James Kildare and his finaceé, nurse Mary Lamont, make plans for their wedding day, Mary's brother Douglas arrives for a visit. Douglas meets with Dr. Kildare and asks him to arrange a meeting with wealthy Mr. Chanler, whose daughter Dr. Kildare saved some time ago, in order to solicit funding for subsidized trade schools. Soon after, the happy couple's optimism evaporates into despair when Douglas begins to hear nonexistent sounds and experience extreme mood swings, symptoms that lead Dr. Kildare to suspect that Douglas may have epilepsy, a hereditary condition that threatens his marriage to Mary. Dr. Kildare succeeds in getting Douglas an appointment with Chanler, but while Douglas meets with the philanthropist, Mary tells Dr. Kildare that her brother was kept awake all night by the sounds of a screaming woman, which confirms his suspicions about Douglas' epileptic symptoms and promts him to call Chanler and have him send Douglas to his office right away. The results of an experiment, in which Dr. Kildare administers coffee, whiskey, meat and salt to Douglas and lies to him in order to shock his nervous system, suggest that Dr. Kildare's assumption is correct. Dr. Kildare sadly admits that Douglas' prognosis is at best a lifetime of mediocrity and a complete mental breakdown at worst. As a result, Mary and Douglas plan to run away, but their flight is interrupted by the intervention of Dr. Gillespie, whose shrewd questioning of Douglas elicits the fact that he has suffered a recent head injury that might be responsible for the symptoms. When a further examination reveals a head trauma that can be remedied by ... +


As young doctor James Kildare and his finaceé, nurse Mary Lamont, make plans for their wedding day, Mary's brother Douglas arrives for a visit. Douglas meets with Dr. Kildare and asks him to arrange a meeting with wealthy Mr. Chanler, whose daughter Dr. Kildare saved some time ago, in order to solicit funding for subsidized trade schools. Soon after, the happy couple's optimism evaporates into despair when Douglas begins to hear nonexistent sounds and experience extreme mood swings, symptoms that lead Dr. Kildare to suspect that Douglas may have epilepsy, a hereditary condition that threatens his marriage to Mary. Dr. Kildare succeeds in getting Douglas an appointment with Chanler, but while Douglas meets with the philanthropist, Mary tells Dr. Kildare that her brother was kept awake all night by the sounds of a screaming woman, which confirms his suspicions about Douglas' epileptic symptoms and promts him to call Chanler and have him send Douglas to his office right away. The results of an experiment, in which Dr. Kildare administers coffee, whiskey, meat and salt to Douglas and lies to him in order to shock his nervous system, suggest that Dr. Kildare's assumption is correct. Dr. Kildare sadly admits that Douglas' prognosis is at best a lifetime of mediocrity and a complete mental breakdown at worst. As a result, Mary and Douglas plan to run away, but their flight is interrupted by the intervention of Dr. Gillespie, whose shrewd questioning of Douglas elicits the fact that he has suffered a recent head injury that might be responsible for the symptoms. When a further examination reveals a head trauma that can be remedied by a simple operation, the future again looks bright for Mary and her young doctor. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Medical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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