And So They Were Married (1936)

68,72 or 74-75 mins | Romantic comedy | 10 May 1936

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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Bless Their Hearts. ...

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The working title of the film was Bless Their Hearts.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
14 May 1936
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
11 Apr 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
28 Mar 1936
p. 29
Motion Picture Herald
18 Apr 1936
p. 36
New York Times
14 May 1936
p. 29
Time
25 May 1936
p. 48
Variety
20 May 1936
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Harry Cohn, Pres.; A B. P. Schulberg Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
A. Laurie Brazee
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Bless Their Hearts" by Sarah Addington in Good Housekeeping (Jan 1936).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Bless Their Hearts
Release Date:
10 May 1936
Production Date:
7 Feb--20 Mar 1936
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
4 May 1936
LP6330
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68,72 or 74-75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2059
SYNOPSIS

Just before Christmas, widower Stephen Blake arrives at the gala opening of Snowcrest Lodge, followed by a group headed by divorcée Edith Farnham, her ten-year-old daughter Brenda and their maid, Ellen. The two groups are immediately at odds because of a near collision on the snowy road leading to the lodge. The lodge sports director Ralph P. Snirley and the hotel hostess, Alma Peabody, try to start a romance between Stephen and Edith, who are the only guests because heavy snows prohibit passage to and from the lodge. Stephen and Edith decide to ally themselves against the intrusive Snirley and Peabody. They flirt during a walk in the snow, then notice that the road has opened. Stephen's son Tommy arrives trying to keep the presence of his dog Harold secret. Harold demolishes Brenda's snow "lady" and she and Tommy fight. While Stephen and Edith dance at the lodge, the children overhear Miss Peabody predict wedding bells, and decide to work together to keep their parents apart. Stephen proposes marriage to Edith as they slide down the mountain snow, and she accepts. To avoid losing their Christmas presents, Tommy and Brenda attempt a truce that ends in a fight that blows the lodge's fuses. In the ensuing darkness, Stephen accidentally spanks Brenda, and he and Edith decide that their marriage would hurt the children. Both leave the lodge depressed and return to their homes in the city. During a phone call, Tommy and Brenda decide to reunite Stephen and Edith by disappearing. Their parents suspect they have been kidnapped and search for them but fail to notice the children asleep in the rumble ...

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Just before Christmas, widower Stephen Blake arrives at the gala opening of Snowcrest Lodge, followed by a group headed by divorcée Edith Farnham, her ten-year-old daughter Brenda and their maid, Ellen. The two groups are immediately at odds because of a near collision on the snowy road leading to the lodge. The lodge sports director Ralph P. Snirley and the hotel hostess, Alma Peabody, try to start a romance between Stephen and Edith, who are the only guests because heavy snows prohibit passage to and from the lodge. Stephen and Edith decide to ally themselves against the intrusive Snirley and Peabody. They flirt during a walk in the snow, then notice that the road has opened. Stephen's son Tommy arrives trying to keep the presence of his dog Harold secret. Harold demolishes Brenda's snow "lady" and she and Tommy fight. While Stephen and Edith dance at the lodge, the children overhear Miss Peabody predict wedding bells, and decide to work together to keep their parents apart. Stephen proposes marriage to Edith as they slide down the mountain snow, and she accepts. To avoid losing their Christmas presents, Tommy and Brenda attempt a truce that ends in a fight that blows the lodge's fuses. In the ensuing darkness, Stephen accidentally spanks Brenda, and he and Edith decide that their marriage would hurt the children. Both leave the lodge depressed and return to their homes in the city. During a phone call, Tommy and Brenda decide to reunite Stephen and Edith by disappearing. Their parents suspect they have been kidnapped and search for them but fail to notice the children asleep in the rumble seat of their own car. Police see the children, however, and arrest Stephen and Edith because the children deny that they are their parents. After spending New Year's Eve in jail, Stephen and Edith are finally identified by Snirley and Miss Peabody, who are now married. While Tommy and Brenda each try to protect the other from punishment for the scheme, Stephen and Edith realize that the children like each other at last and decide to marry.

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GENRE
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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