See Here, Private Hargrove (1944)

100-101 mins | Comedy-drama | March 1944

Writer:

Harry Kurnitz

Producer:

George Haight

Cinematographer:

Charles Lawton

Editor:

Frank E. Hull

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Marion Hargrove began his writing career as a reporter for the Charlotte News in North Carolina and was unanimously voted Fort Bragg's "worst all-round selectee." According to contemporary sources, playwright Maxwell Anderson helped Hargrove find a publisher for his autobiography, which became a best-seller. The Var review noted that "the book...was a find and the cost of the film rights reasonable because the purchase was made long before the Hargrove piece hit the bookstalls and the best-seller class." Hargrove went on to a successful career as a screenwriter, authoring such films as The Music Man (1962) and Boys Night Out (1962).
       In Sep 1942, HR reported that Hugo Butler had been assigned to write the film's script, but his contribution to the completed film, if any, has not been determined. According to War Dept. records, contained at NARS In Washington, D.C., some scenes in the film were shot at Fort Bragg, NC. Capt. Edward J. Flynn, who was associated with the Fort Bragg Field Artillery unit, served as a technical advisor on the production, overseeing such details as the length of the actors' hair and their Army costumes. M-G-M was also granted permission to shoot some "summer" scenes at Camp Roberts, CA, according to HR and War Dept. records. Army stock shots were used in the picture, according to War Dept. records. In Nov 1943, Tay Garnett was assigned to direct retakes on the picture, as Wesley Ruggles had already begun shooting War and Peace in England. Although Hargrove, who had been promoted to sergeant by the time the film was ... More Less

Marion Hargrove began his writing career as a reporter for the Charlotte News in North Carolina and was unanimously voted Fort Bragg's "worst all-round selectee." According to contemporary sources, playwright Maxwell Anderson helped Hargrove find a publisher for his autobiography, which became a best-seller. The Var review noted that "the book...was a find and the cost of the film rights reasonable because the purchase was made long before the Hargrove piece hit the bookstalls and the best-seller class." Hargrove went on to a successful career as a screenwriter, authoring such films as The Music Man (1962) and Boys Night Out (1962).
       In Sep 1942, HR reported that Hugo Butler had been assigned to write the film's script, but his contribution to the completed film, if any, has not been determined. According to War Dept. records, contained at NARS In Washington, D.C., some scenes in the film were shot at Fort Bragg, NC. Capt. Edward J. Flynn, who was associated with the Fort Bragg Field Artillery unit, served as a technical advisor on the production, overseeing such details as the length of the actors' hair and their Army costumes. M-G-M was also granted permission to shoot some "summer" scenes at Camp Roberts, CA, according to HR and War Dept. records. Army stock shots were used in the picture, according to War Dept. records. In Nov 1943, Tay Garnett was assigned to direct retakes on the picture, as Wesley Ruggles had already begun shooting War and Peace in England. Although Hargrove, who had been promoted to sergeant by the time the film was completed, asked permission to preview and consult on the picture, the Army denied his request.
       Although credited in CBCS in the roles of "Farmer" and "Farmer's wife," Louis Mason and Connie Gilchrist did not appear in the completed film. HR lists Victor Kilian, Jr., Jack Purcell, Bill Hickman, David Essex, Jerry Shane, Margaret Adden, Naomi Scher, Bert Callaghan, Dick Elliott and Rudolph Martin, who was Hargrove's cousin, as cast members, but their participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. In addition, HR announced that Mitchell Kowall had been tested for a character role, but his appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed.
       Late Jan 1944 War Dept. records indicate that M-G-M was planning a 17 Feb 1944 premiere of the film at Fort Bragg, and a 19 Feb 1944 opening at Charlotte, NC, Hargrove's hometown. These premieres have not been confirmed, however. According to HR , M-G-M "kicked off" a nationwide Red Cross drive with a 21 Mar 1944 "invitational screening" of the film for the armed forces and civic leaders. In the spring of 1944, Parents' magazine, as well as the National Screen Council, cited the film for excellence, according to HR . In 1945, M-G-M released a sequel to See Here, Private Hargrove , titled What Next, Corporal Hargrove? (See Entry). Robert Walker and Keenan Wynn reprised their roles for the sequel. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19-Feb-44
---
Collier's
31 Oct 1942.
---
Daily Variety
14 Feb 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Feb 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 42
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 44
p. 1.
Life
21 Sep 1942.
---
Life
27 Mar 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Feb 44
p. 1761.
New York Times
22 Mar 44
p. 17.
Variety
23 Feb 44
p. 10
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Fred Graff
James Carpenter
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir of retakes
Asst dir
Asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
Asst 2d cam
2d unit cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
Sd mixer
Stageman
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr clerk
Painter
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Fort Bragg crew
Fort Bragg crew
Fort Bragg crew
Fort Bragg crew
Fort Bragg crew
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book See Here, Private Hargrove by Marion Hargrove (New York, 1942).
SONGS
"In My Arms," words by Frank Loesser, music by Ted Grouya.
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 March 1944
Production Date:
late June--late September 1943
addl scenes began 29 November and 6 December 1943, 3 January 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 February 1944
Copyright Number:
LP174
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
100-101
Length(in feet):
9,083
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9721
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Just after his managing editor, Brodie S. Griffith, lectures him on his sloppy reporting techniques, young journalist Marion Hargrove receives his draft notice. On the bus to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where he is to receive his training as a field artillery specialist, Hargrove meets fellow recruits Orrin Esty and Mulvehill. Hargrove, Esty, Mulvehill and a fourth recruit, Bill Burk, become fast friends, forming their own unit within their assigned battery. Although Hargrove is anxious to become a good soldier, his careless, forgetful nature continually gets him into trouble, and he spends much of his time cleaning trashcans for K.P. duty. Hargrove is also a poor marksman, leading his sergeants, Cramp and Heldon, to wonder whether he will ever graduate from basic training. When Hargrove receives a sympathy check from Griffith, to whom he had submitted an article about his military experiences, the wheeling-dealing Mulvehill decides that Hargrove's writing could be a source of added income for them all and encourages him to continue. One evening, outside the camp's service club in Fayetteville, Hargrove spies Carol Holliday and is instantly smitten. Seeing an opportunity, Mulvehill tells Hargrove that Carol is a member of his newly formed Date Bureau and offers to set him up for five dollars. Hargrove eagerly accepts Mulvehill's deal and, believing that Carol is expecting him, shows up at her house that Saturday night. When a surprised Carol finds out that Hargrove paid five dollars to date her, she becomes furious and prepares to throw him out. Feeling sorry for the bemused private, Carol's uncle George convinces her to forgive Hargrove, and she and Hargrove enjoy a romantic evening together. ... +


Just after his managing editor, Brodie S. Griffith, lectures him on his sloppy reporting techniques, young journalist Marion Hargrove receives his draft notice. On the bus to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where he is to receive his training as a field artillery specialist, Hargrove meets fellow recruits Orrin Esty and Mulvehill. Hargrove, Esty, Mulvehill and a fourth recruit, Bill Burk, become fast friends, forming their own unit within their assigned battery. Although Hargrove is anxious to become a good soldier, his careless, forgetful nature continually gets him into trouble, and he spends much of his time cleaning trashcans for K.P. duty. Hargrove is also a poor marksman, leading his sergeants, Cramp and Heldon, to wonder whether he will ever graduate from basic training. When Hargrove receives a sympathy check from Griffith, to whom he had submitted an article about his military experiences, the wheeling-dealing Mulvehill decides that Hargrove's writing could be a source of added income for them all and encourages him to continue. One evening, outside the camp's service club in Fayetteville, Hargrove spies Carol Holliday and is instantly smitten. Seeing an opportunity, Mulvehill tells Hargrove that Carol is a member of his newly formed Date Bureau and offers to set him up for five dollars. Hargrove eagerly accepts Mulvehill's deal and, believing that Carol is expecting him, shows up at her house that Saturday night. When a surprised Carol finds out that Hargrove paid five dollars to date her, she becomes furious and prepares to throw him out. Feeling sorry for the bemused private, Carol's uncle George convinces her to forgive Hargrove, and she and Hargrove enjoy a romantic evening together. The lovestruck Hargrove makes plans with Carol to see each other the following Saturday, just before Carol, who lives in New York, is to return home. Over the next week, Hargrove's military performance greatly improves, but on Saturday, his typewriter accidentally falls on top of his commanding officer's head during an inspection and he is given street cleaning detail. To save Hargrove embarrassment, Mulvehill and Esty tell Carol he has contracted measles and is under quarantine. Despite the privates' efforts to distract her, Carol sees Hargrove cleaning the street, but forgives him for missing their date and kisses him. Later, after Carol has left for New York, a depressed Hargrove announces that he is through with writing. When Mulvehill reminds Hargrove that the only way he can afford to go to New York during his furlough is to keep writing, however, Hargrove relents. Hargrove then surprises his battery by scoring the most points during an artillery drill and is promoted to corporal. Hargrove's success is shortlived, however, as he leads Mulvehill, Burk and Esty to the wrong headquarters during a field exercise. Sure that his furlough will be denied, the demoted Hargrove spends all of his cash entertaining his friends and is mortified when he learns that his furlough request has been honored. Mulvehill then makes a deal with Hargrove, in which he, Esty and Burk will lend Hargrove enough money for his furlough in exchange for a percentage of his future earnings. The now-flush Hargrove races up to New York, and over the next week, cements his relationship with Carol. Soon after Hargrove returns to Fort Bragg, Mulvehill convinces him that they should apply for a transfer to a public relations office, where Hargrove's journalistic skills can be put to use. Before they receive word about their request, the battery is shipped to another camp, and the men are subjected to more grueling training. Hargrove then learns that an autobiographical manuscript that he had submitted to various publishers has been accepted by one. As agreed, the four privates divide up Hargrove's $300 advance, but when word comes that Hargrove and Mulvehill's transfer has come through, a disgusted Esty and Burk reject the money. Hargrove and Mulvehill move to their comfortable quarters at the camp's public relations office, where a guilt-ridden Hargrove churns out copy for the Army. As soon as the privates hear that their platoon is being shipped overseas, they request to be transferred back, and receive their new orders moments before the battery's train leaves for the coast. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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