A Girl of the Limberlost (1934)

76,78 or 86 mins | Drama | 15 October 1934

Director:

Christy Cabanne

Writer:

Adele Comandini

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Editor:

Carl Pierson

Production Company:

Monogram Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

This film was also reviewed as The Girl of the Limberlost and Girl of the Limberlost. A pre-production FD news item states that Monogram "dickered" for Margaret Sullavan for the role of Elnora. Other HR news items indicate that Marian Marsh was selected to play "Elnora" after an extensive search. According to publicity items in the copyright records, sixty different interior sets as well as exterior "swamp" sets, which required six weeks of construction, were built for this production, which was shot in part at the Monogram Ranch in Placerita Canyon, Newhall, CA. A HR pre-release news item stated that before Monogram edited the film to nine reels, it was first cut from fourteen reels to twelve. Prior to the final edit, Monogram debated whether to keep the film at twelve reels and release it as a "special." Gene Stratton-Porter's novel was first produced in 1924 by First National Pictures. John Francis Dillon directed Ann Harding and James Rennie in this silent version (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.2099). Monogram made another version of the story in 1938 as Romance of the Limberlost (See Entry). In 1945 Columbia made a third version of the novel, directed by Melebor Ferrar and starring Ruth Nelson and Dorinda Clifton. ...

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This film was also reviewed as The Girl of the Limberlost and Girl of the Limberlost. A pre-production FD news item states that Monogram "dickered" for Margaret Sullavan for the role of Elnora. Other HR news items indicate that Marian Marsh was selected to play "Elnora" after an extensive search. According to publicity items in the copyright records, sixty different interior sets as well as exterior "swamp" sets, which required six weeks of construction, were built for this production, which was shot in part at the Monogram Ranch in Placerita Canyon, Newhall, CA. A HR pre-release news item stated that before Monogram edited the film to nine reels, it was first cut from fourteen reels to twelve. Prior to the final edit, Monogram debated whether to keep the film at twelve reels and release it as a "special." Gene Stratton-Porter's novel was first produced in 1924 by First National Pictures. John Francis Dillon directed Ann Harding and James Rennie in this silent version (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.2099). Monogram made another version of the story in 1938 as Romance of the Limberlost (See Entry). In 1945 Columbia made a third version of the novel, directed by Melebor Ferrar and starring Ruth Nelson and Dorinda Clifton.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Corporate note credit:
General (mod):
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Jul 1934
p. 4
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
30 Jun 1934
p. 4
Film Daily
29 Aug 1934
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 1934
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jun 1934
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1934
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1934
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
29 Aug 1934
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
14 Jul 1934
p. 48
Motion Picture Herald
1 Sep 1934
p. 33
New York Times
9 Nov 1934
p. 24
Variety
13 Nov 1934
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Trem Carr, Vice-President in Charge of Production; A William T. Lackey Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
John A. Stransky Jr.
Rec
PRODUCTION MISC
E. R. Hickson
Tech dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel A Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton-Porter (New York, 1909).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 October 1934
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Portland, OR: 15 Sep 1934
Production Date:
29 Jun--16 Jul 1934 at Talisman Studios
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
8 September 1934
LP4937
Physical Properties:
Sound
Balsley & Phillips Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76,78 or 86
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
190
SYNOPSIS

While returning home from a illicit tryst, Frank Comstock is sucked into the swamp near his Indiana home and cries to his pregnant wife Katherine for help. Racked with labor pains, Katherine is unable to save her husband and bears her child Elnora alone. Because she feels that Elnora is responsible for Frank's death, Katherine shows only hatred for her growing daughter. The lonely Elnora is befriended by her aunt and uncle, Wesley and Margaret Sinton, who shower her with affection and educate her about swamp life. Against Katherine's wishes, Elnora enrolls in a high school and, to pay for her tuition and clothes, sells her rare butterfly collection to Mrs. Parker, also known as the "The Bird Woman." All through high school, Elnora is opposed by Katherine, who fails to relent from her disparaging ways even when Phillip Ammon, the son of the village doctor, takes a romantic interest in Elnora. After graduation, Elnora continues to rely on the Sintons for support. However, when Elnora's meager savings for college are stolen by a youth from across the swamps, Katherine takes it upon herself to retrieve the money. While tracking the youth, Katherine meets up with her husband's former lover and finally learns the truth of his infidelity. Phillip meanwhile is suprised by the arrival of his fiancée, Edith Carr. When Phillip sees Edith's jealousy of Elnora, he realizes his love for the village girl and breaks with Edith. In the end, Katherine reconciles with Elnora, and Phillip and Elnora are ...

More Less

While returning home from a illicit tryst, Frank Comstock is sucked into the swamp near his Indiana home and cries to his pregnant wife Katherine for help. Racked with labor pains, Katherine is unable to save her husband and bears her child Elnora alone. Because she feels that Elnora is responsible for Frank's death, Katherine shows only hatred for her growing daughter. The lonely Elnora is befriended by her aunt and uncle, Wesley and Margaret Sinton, who shower her with affection and educate her about swamp life. Against Katherine's wishes, Elnora enrolls in a high school and, to pay for her tuition and clothes, sells her rare butterfly collection to Mrs. Parker, also known as the "The Bird Woman." All through high school, Elnora is opposed by Katherine, who fails to relent from her disparaging ways even when Phillip Ammon, the son of the village doctor, takes a romantic interest in Elnora. After graduation, Elnora continues to rely on the Sintons for support. However, when Elnora's meager savings for college are stolen by a youth from across the swamps, Katherine takes it upon herself to retrieve the money. While tracking the youth, Katherine meets up with her husband's former lover and finally learns the truth of his infidelity. Phillip meanwhile is suprised by the arrival of his fiancée, Edith Carr. When Phillip sees Edith's jealousy of Elnora, he realizes his love for the village girl and breaks with Edith. In the end, Katherine reconciles with Elnora, and Phillip and Elnora are united.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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