She Has What It Takes (1943)

64 or 66 mins | Drama | 15 April 1943

Director:

Charles Barton

Producer:

Colbert Clark

Cinematographer:

Philip Tannura

Editor:

Al Clark

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Broadway Daddies. ...

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The working title of this film was Broadway Daddies.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1943
p. 3
Film Daily
15 Apr 1943
p
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1942
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1943
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jul 1943
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Mar 1943
p. 1192
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Jul 1943
p. 1427
Variety
2 Jun 1943
p. 8
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Rex Bailey
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Let's March Together," words and music by Saul Chaplin; "I Bumped My Head on a Star," words and music by Cindy Walker; "Honk, Honk," words and music by Roy Jacobs and Gene DePaul; "Timber, Timber," words and music by Don Reid and Henry Tobias; "Moon on My Pillow," words and music by Charlie, Elliott and Henry Tobias.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Broadway Daddies
Release Date:
15 April 1943
Production Date:
14 Dec 1942--2 Jan 1943
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
22 March 1943
LP11919
Duration(in mins):
64 or 66
Length(in feet):
5,881
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Somewhere in the Midwest, a second-rate comedy act is about to disband and hitchhike back to New York when they notice a newspaper article by syndicated columnist Roger Rutledge, eulogizing Mary Morris, a once-famous actress who died alone in dire poverty. When Fay Morris, one of the singers in the troupe, comes backstage after her performance, her colleagues ask her if Mary Morris was any relation, and when Fay turns pale and begins to cry, the troupe assumes that Mary was her mother. Although Fay is not related to Mary, the wily actress decides to hurry back to New York and tell Roger that Mary Morris was her mother but became separated from her after running off with an engineer. Roger believes Mary's story and soon finds himself falling in love with her. Presenting her with a list of all the Broadway producers who made millions of dollars on Mary Morris, Roger encourages her to lobby them about being included in one of their shows. Mary is rejected by everyone except Lee Shuleman, who wants to star her in a play about her mother's life, but is lacking the money to finance it. When Roger mentions this sad story to a Greek restaurateur, the man passes the word along to a dozen of Mary's old friends who are now successful because of her support and financial help. Together, they form a pool and raise enough money to produce Shuleman's play, and Fay, touched, is tempted to tell them that she is an impostor but cannot bear to disappoint them. Everything goes well until June Leslie, a publicist who is in love with Roger, discovers the ...

More Less

Somewhere in the Midwest, a second-rate comedy act is about to disband and hitchhike back to New York when they notice a newspaper article by syndicated columnist Roger Rutledge, eulogizing Mary Morris, a once-famous actress who died alone in dire poverty. When Fay Morris, one of the singers in the troupe, comes backstage after her performance, her colleagues ask her if Mary Morris was any relation, and when Fay turns pale and begins to cry, the troupe assumes that Mary was her mother. Although Fay is not related to Mary, the wily actress decides to hurry back to New York and tell Roger that Mary Morris was her mother but became separated from her after running off with an engineer. Roger believes Mary's story and soon finds himself falling in love with her. Presenting her with a list of all the Broadway producers who made millions of dollars on Mary Morris, Roger encourages her to lobby them about being included in one of their shows. Mary is rejected by everyone except Lee Shuleman, who wants to star her in a play about her mother's life, but is lacking the money to finance it. When Roger mentions this sad story to a Greek restaurateur, the man passes the word along to a dozen of Mary's old friends who are now successful because of her support and financial help. Together, they form a pool and raise enough money to produce Shuleman's play, and Fay, touched, is tempted to tell them that she is an impostor but cannot bear to disappoint them. Everything goes well until June Leslie, a publicist who is in love with Roger, discovers the truth about Fay. June is about to expose Fay's true identity when Roger and the backers of the show kidnap her and hold her until Fay becomes an overnight hit in Schuleman's play. With Fay's success, everyone forgives her for the hoax and June loses both Roger and her scoop.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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