Redhead (1934)

76-77 mins | Drama | 1 November 1934

Director:

Melville Brown

Writer:

Betty Burbridge

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Production Company:

Monogram Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Monogram borrowed Grace Bradley from Paramount for this production. HR production charts add Herbert Vigran and Ed Brophy to the cast list. It is possible that "Ed Brophy " is a misspelling of credited actor Ed Brady's name. ...

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Monogram borrowed Grace Bradley from Paramount for this production. HR production charts add Herbert Vigran and Ed Brophy to the cast list. It is possible that "Ed Brophy " is a misspelling of credited actor Ed Brady's name.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Personal note credit:
Corporate note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Sep 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
18 Sep 1934
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1934
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1934
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
22 Sep 1934
p. 43
New York Times
16 Nov 1934
p. 27
Variety
20 Nov 1934
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Trem Carr, Vice-President in Charge of Production; A Dorothy Reid Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SOUND
John A. Stransky Jr.
Rec
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel Redhead by Vera Brown (New York, 1933).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 November 1934
Production Date:
began 14 Jul 1934 at RKO Pathé Studios
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
22 September 1934
LP4976
Physical Properties:
Sound
Balsley & Phillips Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
224
SYNOPSIS

Dale Carter, an artist's model, is charged with murder after her employer, artist Claude Martin, is killed during a studio party. Although cleared of the crime, Dale is unable to find work because of the publicity generated by the sensationalistic trial. Broke and in arrears on her rent, Dale goes to a park, where she meets drunken Ted Brown, the shiftless son of a wealthy man. Upon hearing Dale's story, Ted, whose allowance has been severed by his disapproving father, suggests that they marry and then demand $20,000 from his father, who dreads scandalous publicity, for a divorce. Dale accepts Ted's offer but is stunned when, instead of outrage, Mr. Brown laughs at their demand and then secretly offers Dale $10,000 to help Ted and keep his name out of the newspapers. After Dale agrees to Mr. Brown's offer, she and Ted take off in Ted's expensive roadster. Penniless, the couple soon decides to trade the roadster for a traveling lunch wagon and sells Ted's valuable wristwatch for the necessary supplies. Eventually the couple settles near a factory, where Ted is mistaken for a worker and is given a job. While Dale peddles hamburgers from the wagon, Ted toils on the factory's unsafe machinery. One day, Scoop, a reporter friend of Dale's, uncovers her secret marriage and threatens to send the news to the press. Dale confesses to Scoop that she loves Ted and, after explaining her deal with Mr. Brown, convinces him to stifle the story. Concerned about the well-being of the factory workers, Ted, a trained engineer, invents a safety device for the machinery but is unable to convince ...

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Dale Carter, an artist's model, is charged with murder after her employer, artist Claude Martin, is killed during a studio party. Although cleared of the crime, Dale is unable to find work because of the publicity generated by the sensationalistic trial. Broke and in arrears on her rent, Dale goes to a park, where she meets drunken Ted Brown, the shiftless son of a wealthy man. Upon hearing Dale's story, Ted, whose allowance has been severed by his disapproving father, suggests that they marry and then demand $20,000 from his father, who dreads scandalous publicity, for a divorce. Dale accepts Ted's offer but is stunned when, instead of outrage, Mr. Brown laughs at their demand and then secretly offers Dale $10,000 to help Ted and keep his name out of the newspapers. After Dale agrees to Mr. Brown's offer, she and Ted take off in Ted's expensive roadster. Penniless, the couple soon decides to trade the roadster for a traveling lunch wagon and sells Ted's valuable wristwatch for the necessary supplies. Eventually the couple settles near a factory, where Ted is mistaken for a worker and is given a job. While Dale peddles hamburgers from the wagon, Ted toils on the factory's unsafe machinery. One day, Scoop, a reporter friend of Dale's, uncovers her secret marriage and threatens to send the news to the press. Dale confesses to Scoop that she loves Ted and, after explaining her deal with Mr. Brown, convinces him to stifle the story. Concerned about the well-being of the factory workers, Ted, a trained engineer, invents a safety device for the machinery but is unable to convince his boss to buy it and is fired. With the help of Scoop and his newspaper, Dale brings Ted's device to the attention of the factory owner, who buys the invention. At the same time, Dale realizes that she is not Ted's social equal and, to protect his family standing, pretends that she is not in love with him and shows him the agreement she had made with his father. In the end, however, Ted and Dale resolve their differences and are happily reunited with a satisfied Mr. Brown.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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