The Town (2010)

R | 124 mins | Drama | 17 September 2010

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

The Town opens with the written statement: “One blue-collar neighborhood has produced more bank robbers and armored car thieves than anywhere in the world. Charlestown.” It is followed by the written quotations: “Bank robbery became like a trade in Charlestown, passed down father to son,” by a Federal Agent, and: “I’m proud to be from Charlestown. It ruined my life, literally, but I’m proud,” by a Charlestown Man. All of the credits for cast and crew appear at the end of the picture. In between the principal credits and the end scroll, another title card reads: “Charlestown’s reputation as a breeding ground for armed robbers is authentic. However, this film all but ignores the great majority of the residents of Charlestown, past and present, who are the same good and true people found most anywhere. This film is dedicated to them.”
       An 8 Aug 2006 HR news item reports the novel Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan was optioned by Graham King’s Initial Entertainment Group and was, at the time of the news item, in pre-production for Warner Bros. with writer Sheldon Turner ( The Longest Yard , 2005, see entry) and director Adrian Lyne ( Fatal Attraction , 1987, see entry), who brought the novel to King’s attention. On 16 Sep 2008, HR and DV news items announce negotiations for Ben Affleck to re-write, direct and star in the production.        According to a 24 Nov 2010 HR article, Affleck inherited a script written by Lyne, Peter Craig and Chuck Hogan that had been deemed fifty pages too ... More Less

The Town opens with the written statement: “One blue-collar neighborhood has produced more bank robbers and armored car thieves than anywhere in the world. Charlestown.” It is followed by the written quotations: “Bank robbery became like a trade in Charlestown, passed down father to son,” by a Federal Agent, and: “I’m proud to be from Charlestown. It ruined my life, literally, but I’m proud,” by a Charlestown Man. All of the credits for cast and crew appear at the end of the picture. In between the principal credits and the end scroll, another title card reads: “Charlestown’s reputation as a breeding ground for armed robbers is authentic. However, this film all but ignores the great majority of the residents of Charlestown, past and present, who are the same good and true people found most anywhere. This film is dedicated to them.”
       An 8 Aug 2006 HR news item reports the novel Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan was optioned by Graham King’s Initial Entertainment Group and was, at the time of the news item, in pre-production for Warner Bros. with writer Sheldon Turner ( The Longest Yard , 2005, see entry) and director Adrian Lyne ( Fatal Attraction , 1987, see entry), who brought the novel to King’s attention. On 16 Sep 2008, HR and DV news items announce negotiations for Ben Affleck to re-write, direct and star in the production.        According to a 24 Nov 2010 HR article, Affleck inherited a script written by Lyne, Peter Craig and Chuck Hogan that had been deemed fifty pages too long and fifty percent over budget by Warner Bros., who tasked him with condensing the story so it could be made for $37 million. With co-writer Aaron Stockard, who was a high-school classmate of Affleck’s and also a Boston native, a new script was completed after three weeks of intensive research. Production began in Aug 2009 with an 11 ½-week shooting schedule. Of the three original collaborators on the script, Peter Craig is the only writer to receive on-screen credit, and his name is listed above Affleck and Stockard. As noted in various articles and news items, Affleck was selected by Warner Bros. based on the critical acclaim of his directorial debut, Gone Baby Gone (2007, see entry), which was also set in Boston and covers similar themes within the same genre. The Town is Affleck’s first film performing multiple roles of writer, director and star.
       According to studio production notes from AMPAS library files, it was a priority for Affleck to shoot The Town on location in Boston, and his commitment to capturing an authentic representation of his hometown and its residents extended to hiring locals as cast, crew and consultants. Principal photography, shot in Charlestown, Cambridge and the North End, focused on juxtaposing impoverishment with the increasing signs of gentrification, according to producer Basil Iwanyk in the production notes, reflecting “a place in transition.” Other locations, as noted in a 24 Nov 2010 HR article, included a ten day shoot at Fenway Park while the Red Sox were out on tour and MCI – Cedar Junction, a maximum security prison near Boston.
       Production designer, Sharon Seymour, and costume designer, Susan Matheson, describe Affleck’s concern for using contrast to illustrate Charlestown in the production notes. The sets of Doug and Claire’s apartments were dressed distinctly to convey the disparity between the working-class “Townies” and the up-and-coming “Toonies” of Charlestown society and the wardrobes for Krista and Claire were selected as opposites. Accuracy of dialect was used to delineate the characters’ backgrounds authentically, and, as described in the production notes, Affleck encouraged the locals in his cast to share their expertise while instructing others to learn through listening to them rather than through formal coaching.
       The 24 Nov 2010 HR article further explains Affleck’s method of immersion for the research and development of The Town . He consulted with the FBI Violent Crimes Task Force in Boston as well as clandestine members of the Charlestown underground, who agreed to share their experiences off the record. The car chase scene was modeled after a real incident at Harvard Square in 1995, and, according to production notes, the skeleton masks worn during the heist in the opening scene matched surveillance camera footage of an actual crime shown to Affleck during his tour of FBI headquarters. In a 16 Sep 2010 LAT article, actor Jeremy Renner comments that the set was filled with ex-cons who contributed their personal experiences to make the picture more realistic. This includes Owen Burke, who, according to a 10 Sep 2010 Boston Phoenix article, had only been out of prison six months when he was contacted as a call back for the role of Dez. He was one of thousands of Charlestown locals who had showed up to open casting calls. In a 24 Nov 2010 HR article, Affleck describes how he used interviews from these auditions to enhance the script, calling them a “gold mine” of material.
       HR notes that several alternate endings were shot for The Town , both during principal photography and in the spring of 2010, as pickups. According to Iwanyk, these endings included Doug’s death and the re-establishment of Claire and Doug’s relationship, but test audiences in public and private screenings did not respond positively. Affleck notes his own partiality to “a darker ending” in the LAT article from 16 Sep 2010, but resolved that he could not make it work. He relates that King and the cast deliberated the ethical implications of ending the film with a message that crime paid, and that the complexity of this question ultimately remained unanswered for him.
       The Town was well received by reviewers and critics, and has been nominated for multiple awards. Jeremy Renner garnered particular acclaim with nominations for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role by the Screen Actors Guild, Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture by the Golden Globes and Actor in a Supporting Role by the Academy Awards. The Producers Guild of America nominated Iwanyk and King for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award, the Writers Guild of America nominated Craig, Affleck and Stockard in the category of Adapted Screenplay, and the Art Directors Guild of America nominated Seymour and her team for Excellence in Production Design for a Contemporary Feature Film. The Town was selected by AFI as one of the Movies of the Year for 2010.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Sep 2008.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 2010
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 2006
p. 1, 54.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 2008.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 2010
p. 10, 39.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 2010
p. 74.
Los Angeles Times
16 Sep 2010
p. 1, 7.
Los Angeles Times
17 Sep 2010
p. 1, 12.
New York Times
17 Sep 2010
p. 2.
The Boston Phoenix
10 Sep 2010
p. 9.
Variety
13 Sep 2010
p. 24, 32.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
Aerial cine, 2d unit
"A" cam/Steadicam op
"A" cam 1st asst
"A" cam 2d asst
"B" cam 1st asst
"B" cam 1st asst
"B" cam 2d asst
Cam loader
Video asst op
Video asst op, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Asst lighting tech
Rigging chief lighting tech
Rigging asst lighting tech
Key grip
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy grip
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Dolly grip, 2d unit
"B" dolly grip
Still photog
Cam cranes, dollies, remote & stabilized cam syste
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Addl 1st asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Prop master, 2d unit
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Set des
Leadman
On-set dresser
Stand-by painter
Graphic artist
Storyboard artist
24-frame playback
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Scenic charge
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Key cost, 2d unit
Uniform cost
Set cost, 2d unit
Set cost, 2d unit
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Score mixed by
Score mixed by
Score mixed by
Violin solos
Addl programming
Addl programming
Score coord
Mus consultant
SOUND
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Boom op
Boom op, 2d unit
Sd utility
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff lead pyrotechnician
Spec eff shop foreman
Spec eff on set foreman
Visual eff
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff, hy*drau"lx
Visual eff
Main and end titles
MAKEUP
Makeup dept head
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hair dept head
Key hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc casting
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Loc casting asst
Loc casting asst
Prod supv
Prod supv, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Trainer to Ben Affleck
Post prod supv
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod secy
Prod secy, 2d unit
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Loc mgr
Loc mgr, 2d unit
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr, 2d unit
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt, 2d unit
Picture car coord
Picture car capt
Helicopter pilot
Asst to Ben Affleck
Asst to Graham King
Asst to Graham King
Asst to Basil Iwanyk
Asst to Basil Iwanyk
Unit pub
FBI consultant
FBI liaison
FBI liaison
FBI liaison
FBI liaison
BPD liaison
Prison liaison
Prison liaison
Prison liaison
Prison liaison
Strength trainer liaison
Strength trainer liaison
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Post prod staff asst
Post prod staff asst
Craft services
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate colorist
Digital intermediate prod
Digital intermediate ed
Digital intermediate
Telecine colorist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan (New York, 2004).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"99 Bottles," written by George Carroll and Christopher McIntire, performed by Slaine, courtesy of Suburban Noize Records
"Whatcha Say," written by Kisean Anderson, Jason Desrouleaux, Imogen Heap and Jonathan Rotem, performed by Jason Derulo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing, contains a sample of "Hide and Seek," performed by Imogen Heap, courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment (UK) Limited and J Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Get Paid," written by Jorge Corante and Rhaphael Tarpley, performed by Rhaphael Tarpley, courtesy of Urban Authentic, "Run It," written by George Carroll and Patrick Baril, performed by Slaine and Statik Selektah
+
SONGS
"99 Bottles," written by George Carroll and Christopher McIntire, performed by Slaine, courtesy of Suburban Noize Records
"Whatcha Say," written by Kisean Anderson, Jason Desrouleaux, Imogen Heap and Jonathan Rotem, performed by Jason Derulo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing, contains a sample of "Hide and Seek," performed by Imogen Heap, courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment (UK) Limited and J Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Get Paid," written by Jorge Corante and Rhaphael Tarpley, performed by Rhaphael Tarpley, courtesy of Urban Authentic, "Run It," written by George Carroll and Patrick Baril, performed by Slaine and Statik Selektah
"Jolene," written and performed by Ray LaMontagne, courtesy of RCA Records Label, a unit of Sony Music Entertainment, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 September 2010
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 September 2010
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Digital; dts; Sony Dynamic Digital Sound in selected theatres
Color
Technicolor NY
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with cameras and lenses from Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
124
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
46118
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charlestown, a blue-collar neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, has the highest rate of bank robberies in the world. During the heist of Cambridge Merchant Bank, four heavily armed men disguised in skeleton masks with dreadlocks and black hoodies quickly seize control and hold assistant manager, Claire Keesey, at gunpoint while she nervously fumbles opening the safe. Although the assailants timed their raid to coincide with the expiration of the bank’s security time lock, one robber grabs her shaking hand and calmly tells her to take her time while another grows agitated and pushes her superior to the ground. Once the safe is opened and ransacked, the thieves’ plans are momentarily thwarted by a man outside knocking to get in. When he leaves, they prepare to depart by dousing the surroundings with bleach, but the volatile robber becomes further aggravated upon realizing an alarm was triggered during the disruption and pummels the manager’s face with the butt of his AK-47 rifle. As his partner tries to restrain him, the perpetrator’s hoodie is knocked over, secretly revealing a “Fighting Irish” tattoo on the back of his neck to Claire. Impulsively, the aggressive robber takes Claire hostage, and she is bound and blindfolded in the getaway van while his partner reassures her that she will not be hurt. She is released on a beach and walks, barefooted and blind folded, toward the water. Arriving at the scene, FBI Special Agent Adam Frawley is briefed by Boston police investigator, Dino Ciampa. Bleach prevented the acquisition of DNA evidence and the getaway van was torched, leaving him with no forensic leads to begin his investigation. At ... +


Charlestown, a blue-collar neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, has the highest rate of bank robberies in the world. During the heist of Cambridge Merchant Bank, four heavily armed men disguised in skeleton masks with dreadlocks and black hoodies quickly seize control and hold assistant manager, Claire Keesey, at gunpoint while she nervously fumbles opening the safe. Although the assailants timed their raid to coincide with the expiration of the bank’s security time lock, one robber grabs her shaking hand and calmly tells her to take her time while another grows agitated and pushes her superior to the ground. Once the safe is opened and ransacked, the thieves’ plans are momentarily thwarted by a man outside knocking to get in. When he leaves, they prepare to depart by dousing the surroundings with bleach, but the volatile robber becomes further aggravated upon realizing an alarm was triggered during the disruption and pummels the manager’s face with the butt of his AK-47 rifle. As his partner tries to restrain him, the perpetrator’s hoodie is knocked over, secretly revealing a “Fighting Irish” tattoo on the back of his neck to Claire. Impulsively, the aggressive robber takes Claire hostage, and she is bound and blindfolded in the getaway van while his partner reassures her that she will not be hurt. She is released on a beach and walks, barefooted and blind folded, toward the water. Arriving at the scene, FBI Special Agent Adam Frawley is briefed by Boston police investigator, Dino Ciampa. Bleach prevented the acquisition of DNA evidence and the getaway van was torched, leaving him with no forensic leads to begin his investigation. At the same time, bank robbery mastermind, Doug MacRay, meets up with his collaborators James “Jem” Coughlin, Albert “Gloansy” Magloan and Desmond “Dez” Elden at Charlestown’s inoperative Boys & Girls Club Ice Skating Rink. Jem announces that Claire’s driver’s license shows she is a neighbor and vows to stalk her. In her interview with Frawley, however, Claire refrains from mentioning the tattoo and defensively asks if she needs a lawyer. Frawley tells her people with lawyers usually end up guilty and he thinks she’s fine, but notices her shaking hands and reassures her it is normal to have residual effects. Back at the ice rink, Doug snatches Claire’s driver’s license from Jem, declaring him too impetuous for the job and taking on the surveillance, himself. That evening, Doug and Jem deliver cash to Fergus “Fergie” Colm at his shop, Town Flowers. At a bar, Jem tells Gloansy and Dez about Doug’s father, Stephen MacRay, who accepted extended jail time instead of ratting out his cohorts. As Doug orders a non-alcoholic drink, he encounters Jem’s sister, Krista Coughlin, who was his girlfriend before sobriety. She pretends to drop drugs in his juice, and when she asks if he misses partying, he admits that he does. Back at his apartment, they make love, but when he denies her appeal for him to say he loves it, she leaves in haste. Unable to sleep, Doug goes to a Narcotics Anonymous meeting. Doug keeps surveillance on Claire and follows her into Monument Laundromat, where she asks him for change. He denies her request, but then comforts her as she cries seeing bloodstains on the shirt she wore during the robbery, and he asks her to have a drink. Meanwhile, Frawley blackmails a local drug dealer for information on the robbery. Learning the thieves circumvented the alarm by breaking into the security “junction box,” he spearheads his investigation with a subpoena of Vericom company logs. When Claire and Doug meet, she tells him about the robbery, and although Doug apologizes, she tells him it’s not his fault and that Frawley reassured her side effects were normal. Doug presses her about her involvement with the FBI, but she informs him that they don’t have any leads and admits to omitting her knowledge of the “Fighting Irish” tattoo for fear of having to testify. Frawley’s case breaks with information about Dez, who is a Viacom employee with days off that coincide with other recent bank robberies. As Claire works in the Charlestown Community Garden and inquires about Doug’s parents, he evasively says his father is in the suburbs and his mother left when he was six years old. Despite his attempts to find his mother, she was never seen again and he presumes she is in Florida with his grandmother. Frawley presents photographs of the four thieves to a team of agents and describes their histories, including Jem’s nine years in prison for manslaughter and Doug’s failed prospect of becoming a professional hockey player. At a café, Claire tells Doug that sunny afternoons are depressing because they remind her of the day her brother died, and when Jem makes a surprise appearance, he narrowly misses revealing his tattoo to Claire. Back at their shared apartment, Doug and Jem argue about Doug’s relationship with Claire. Jem pressures Doug to get the next heist underway despite his reservations, pointing out that he waited nine years in Walpole prison for him. Doug visits his father in jail to discuss his intention of leaving Charlestown and asks why he never looked for his mother. Stephen relates that she was no different from the drug-addicted girls with unwanted pregnancies currently in the neighborhood and not worth finding. Later, at Claire’s apartment, she admits seeing Doug’s photograph on the “Local Heroes” board at the Boys & Girls Club where she volunteers as a kick-ball coach in the dry hockey rink. Doug regrets throwing away the opportunity to be a pro-hockey player, then resituates to Claire’s bedroom because his uncle, who lives across the street, has a view into her living room, and they consummate their relationship. As Doug predicted, the next heist is riddled with impediments. After breaking away from an armored car guard who captures one of the robbers at gunpoint, the team, disguised in nun costumes, is chased by the police through the narrow streets of Boston. Several gun battles ensue and, despite Frawley’s orders to close the Charlestown Bridge, they ultimately escape because one cop turns away. Frustrated by a lack of DNA evidence, Frawley demands his crew to procure a fingerprint so that he can bring the men in for questioning. Police cars race to Doug’s workplace at the Boston Sand & Gravel Co., where he is handcuffed without a fight. At police headquarters, Frawley tells Doug he will make sure he dies in prison, but Doug refuses to be intimidated and insinuates that the fingerprint they reportedly collected from the scene is bogus. Upon Doug’s release, Frawley orders phone and computer surveillance. Back at Claire’s apartment, Doug inquires why she quit her job at the bank, presents her with a diamond necklace and suggests that they go away together so he can change his life. They make a pact, despite Doug’s warning that there are things about him that she doesn’t know and won’t like. Later, when Dino presents Frawley with a taped phone conversation between Doug and Claire, he goes to her apartment and, noticing her diamond necklace, reveals Doug as a suspect and says she needs a lawyer after all. At the cemetery where Jem committed murder years earlier, he tells Doug that the florist has a new job for them, but Doug says that he is done and planning to leave Charlestown. Jem accuses Doug of abandoning Krista, her illegitimate daughter and their community, and a fight breaks out when Doug insists that he is not responsible. Jem points out that he killed only to defend Doug and demands appreciation through Doug’s sustained involvement. Doug is grateful for their brotherhood but stays resolute in his decision to leave, telling Jem that if he wants to shoot him, it will have to be in the back. He proceeds to the flower shop to announce his resignation. As Fergie strips thorns off long stemmed roses, he threatens to castrate Doug if he quits, saying he did the same to Stephen by getting his mother hooked on the drugs that prompted her to commit suicide. Fergie warns that Claire will be killed if Doug does not acquiesce. Shaken, Doug arrives at Claire’s apartment to find her traumatized by the news of his involvement with the robbery. Despite his pleas, she kicks him out and begs to never see him again. Upon finding a funeral wreath for Claire back at his apartment, Doug returns to the florist and agrees to do the job, but vows to kill Fergie and his partner, Rusty, if anything happens to Claire. The following day, Doug finds Claire at the Community Garden, and promises never to hurt or lie to her again. Later, Fergie briefs the robbers on their most ambitious assignment to date, clearing out the cash room at Fenway Park. Still in hot pursuit, Frawley questions Krista at a bar about her work for Fergie, dealing the drug Oxy to launder stolen cash, and calculatingly asks if Doug ever bought her a diamond necklace. Krista, high on drugs, finds Doug in an apartment across the street from Fenway on the day of the heist and begs him to take her away with him. Spiraling into a jealous rage, Krista mentions the necklace, and Doug forcefully pushes her to leave. She crashes in front of a school and Frawley uses the opportunity to blackmail her for information about Doug in exchange for the custody of her daughter. Disguised as Boston police officers, Doug and Jem are led through the inner corridors of Fenway by a man indebted to Fergie. As Dez disconnects security cameras, Doug and Jem take control of the guards, force their way into the cash room by threatening the families of the men working inside, and push immense stacks of cash into duffel bags. As they make their exit in the ambulance dock, Doug notices the street outside is lined with policemen in riot gear and federal agents. A gun battle ensues inside, and Gloansy is shot in his bulletproof vest. Grenades are launched into the dock, briefly deafening the robbers and as Dez stands, disoriented, he is shot through the head by a sniper. Gloansy suggests that Doug and Jem get back into their police uniforms and escape while he acts as a decoy by driving the ambulance through the gates. He is shot and killed as the ambulance smashes into an FBI Mobile Command Unit. While Feds and police officers face off for control, Doug and Jem part ways and blend into a crowd of uniformed men. Security from within Fenway reports the heist was orchestrated by policemen, and Frawley redirects his search for Doug and Jem among the scattering cops. Carrying the duffel bag of cash across his back, Jem is conspicuous and upon orders to stop, turns and fires repeatedly at Frawley. After a short chase and gun fight in a public intersection, Jem is shot dead as Doug looks on and drives away in a squad car. He heads to the florist for retribution, killing Rusty and Fergie and taking their stockpile of cash, but news of the incident reaches Frawley who deducts Doug’s new location and moves his stakeout to Claire’s apartment. With a view into Claire’s window from his uncle’s apartment, Doug again apologizes over the phone and, despite seeing Frawley listening in, says he wants to see her. She tells him to come, but then furtively signals a warning by comparing her feelings about the encounter to a sunny day. Doug escapes the scene dressed in his uncle’s bus driver uniform, leaving a hostile note on Frawley’s car and burying Fergie’s cash in the Community Garden for Claire. A plaque reading “An Anonymous Gift in the Memory of Doris MacCray” lines the newly restored Boys & Girls Club Ice Skating Rink where Claire watches children play, and, far away, Doug stands on the porch of a remote hut looking across the water that surrounds it. As stated in the note he left her, he says that he must pay for his actions but he knows he will see her again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.