Fright Night (1985)

R | 106 mins | Horror | 2 August 1985

Director:

Tom Holland

Writer:

Tom Holland

Producer:

Herb Jaffe

Cinematographer:

Jan Kiesser

Editor:

Kent Beyda

Production Designer:

John De Cuir Jr.

Production Company:

Vistar Films
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HISTORY

The police officer played by Art J. Evans refers to himself as "Lieutenant" Lennox, the same title attributed to the character in production notes. However, the film's closing credits lists the character as "Detective" Lennox. The closing credits identify Charlie's mother as "Judy Brewster," although the character's first name is never mentioned in the narrative. Neither is the last name of Amy, who is listed in the closing credits as "Amy Peterson."
       The film's closing credits indicate the production used a clip from Premature Burial , courtesy of Orion Pictures Corporation. The clip is visible on Charlie's bedroom television set when he first spots his new neighbors in the opening scene. The film also features three uncredited film clips that appear as features on Fright Night Theater . The 1972 zombie film, Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things , plays in the background the night Charlie discovers Dandrige is a vampire; Charlie is watching the 1970 Hammer Studio picture, The Scars of Dracula , when Dandrige phones him after their first confrontation. (See entries.) The 1971 Octaman is the extraterrestrial stalker film featured on Fright Night Theater in the final scene.
       A 10 Aug 1985 Screen International article noted that, for the role of Amy, director Tom Holland was looking for an actress that could "go from virgin to slut, and who could make that transition believable." Screen International also reported that principle photography was completed in fifty-three days, attributing the swift schedule to a predominance of studio settings. Production notes added the following: Principal photography began 3 Dec 1984 at Laird International Studios in Los ... More Less

The police officer played by Art J. Evans refers to himself as "Lieutenant" Lennox, the same title attributed to the character in production notes. However, the film's closing credits lists the character as "Detective" Lennox. The closing credits identify Charlie's mother as "Judy Brewster," although the character's first name is never mentioned in the narrative. Neither is the last name of Amy, who is listed in the closing credits as "Amy Peterson."
       The film's closing credits indicate the production used a clip from Premature Burial , courtesy of Orion Pictures Corporation. The clip is visible on Charlie's bedroom television set when he first spots his new neighbors in the opening scene. The film also features three uncredited film clips that appear as features on Fright Night Theater . The 1972 zombie film, Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things , plays in the background the night Charlie discovers Dandrige is a vampire; Charlie is watching the 1970 Hammer Studio picture, The Scars of Dracula , when Dandrige phones him after their first confrontation. (See entries.) The 1971 Octaman is the extraterrestrial stalker film featured on Fright Night Theater in the final scene.
       A 10 Aug 1985 Screen International article noted that, for the role of Amy, director Tom Holland was looking for an actress that could "go from virgin to slut, and who could make that transition believable." Screen International also reported that principle photography was completed in fifty-three days, attributing the swift schedule to a predominance of studio settings. Production notes added the following: Principal photography began 3 Dec 1984 at Laird International Studios in Los Angeles, "where production designer John De Cuir, Jr. created the interiors and exteriors of the multi-level Brewster and Dandridge houses." Exteriors of the two houses were also constructed on the Disney Studio lot in Burbank, which provided the production space needed to capture crane shots. Various locations around Los Angeles were used for the street scenes and those in the night club. The film was Holland's directorial debut, a factor that motivated the involvement of Holland's long-time acquaintance, Producer Herb Jaffe, who had previous success working with first-time directors. However, according to a, 8 Aug HR news item, Fright Night was only the latest title added to Holland's respectable list of previously-produced screenplays. Earlier titles include The Beast Within , Class of 1984 , Psycho II, Scream for Help , and Cloak & Dagger . Holland also worked as an actor, having over two hundred commercials, three soap operas, and a handful of films to his credit. In production notes, Holland claimed Fright Night came from his desire to update the "Boy Who Cried Wolf" tale combined with his affinity for vampire stories. In the Screen International article, Holland added that he tried to make the story as generalized as possible, identifying the setting as "Anywhere USA."
       Despite its contemporary setting, Holland maintained the traditional conventions of vampire narratives. One particular tradition Holland was adamant about carrying over from the classic Victorian-era vampire films, was the "vampire as metaphor for seduction" theme, which Holland set up in the Dandridge-Amy-Charlie dynamic. Holland explained that "on one level this is a story about an older man trying to take a younger man's girl away from him, so a lot of what this film is about is sexual jealousy." While Holland specifically pointed out that he did not want the special effects overshadowing the acting, the film showcases technical advances in special effects and photography executed by Academy Award winner Richard Edlund's Boss Film Corporation, who also did the effects on Ghostbusters (see entry). For example, the vampire's flying sequences were created using optical effects and point-of-view camera perspectives captured with a a remotely-operated camera mounted on "Louma Camera Crane." Jean-Marie Lavalou, Alain Masseron, and David Samuelson won a 2004 Academy Award of Merit for designing the Louma Camera Crane.
       A 2 Aug 1985 HR article, citing an $8.25 million production budget, claimed Fight Night was Columbia's cheapest summer release. According to an Oct 1985 Box review, Fright Night received an MPAA R-rating for "a great deal of violence and some nudity." In a 10 Aug 1985 Screen International interview, Holland boasted that "executive word on the movie is so positive" that the film's US release was moved forward several months. A 10 May 1985 DV news item stated that the picture's initial release date was bumped up to 2 Aug 1985 and a sequel put "in the works," after test screenings proved positive. Statistics on Box Office Mojo.com indicated the film opened at number three for the weekend of 2-4 Aug 1985, pulling in a promising $6,118,543 on 1,542 screens. In a 2 Aug 1985 HR article, Cliff Rothman reported that the film might become one of the studio's biggest hits of the summer, and explained that its "excellent" sneak preview responses motivated Columbia to open the film on more screens than any of its other summer titles. Columbia's vp of distribution and marketing, Bob Dingilian, explained that the film's combination of humor and horror would appeal to a broader audience. Rothman added that the pre-release marketing campaign began weeks before the film's debut and included broad-spectrum, national television and radio advertising spots, an unorthodox marketing tactic for a horror film. Box Office Mojo listed the film's domestic total gross at $24,922,237, suggesting that, while it was not Columbia's biggest summer hit, the untraditional marketing strategy paid off. An 8 Aug HR news item reported that a week after the film's premiere, Holland attended public screenings as a paying customer, in order to gauge audiences' reactions to the film.
       The picture opened to mild critical reception. In a 29 Jul 1985 HR review, critic Dennis Fischer summarized his position with the line: "There's nothing about 'Fright Night' that will scare people away from the theaters, but beyond the prospect of seeing the latest vampiric offerings, it isn't likely to enchant or entice them either." This sentiment was echoed in an Oct 1985 Box review that stated: "'Fright Night' isn't quite as funny or as scary as it should be, but it's still several notches above the standard horror fare. And though it's doubtful that it will appeal to anyone beyond the horror audience, it should still give that particular group its money's worth." Generally, reviews predicted healthy initial box office numbers, but the predicted longevity of box office turn-out varied. Fischer declared crossover prospects to look "fairly anemic," while a more optimistic 31 Jul 1985 Var review predicted that "'Fright' could be a summer sleeper headed for big, big bucks before winter." Susan Sarandon and Roddy McDowell received almost universal praise for their performances, while reviews were split over the film's overall quality and generic categorization. A 31 Jul 1985 Var review termed the picture "a prize," and "a fundamental, rock-bottom thriller, set up first by charm and humor," while an Oct 1985 Box review deemed it "simply a decently done, low-budget horror movie," that stands out as "something 'different'" because of the absence of contemporary decent horror movies. In the Screen International article, Holland expressed frustration at trying to disassociate his film from the "slice and dice" slasher trend gaining steam at the time Fright Night was released. Holland stressed, the film is a "suspense fantasy," not a slasher movie. Incidentally, Holland would later direct and co-write Child's Play , introducing to the screen one of the most recognizable slasher figures in the maniacal child doll, Chucky. In his 2006 book The Changing Vampire of Film and Television , author Tim Kane acknowledges that Fright Night belonged to the "erotic cycle" of vampire narratives embodied most notably by the Hammer films of the late 1950s through 1970s. Yet Kane additionally argued that Fright Night helped give rise to the genre's "sympathetic cycle" by combining generic conventions of the vampire narrative with those of the teen "slasher" film, initiating a slew of vampire films in the 1980s and early 1990s starring teenagers in the lead roles.
       The Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films awarded Fright Night the 1986 award for Best Horror Film, Holland the award for Best Writing, and McDowall the award for Best Supporting Actor. Additionally, Chris Sarandon was nominated for Best Actor, Tom Holland for Best Director, and Richard Edlund for Best Special Effects. Holland additionally won the Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival's 1986 Dario Argent Award and a 1986 Critics' Award - Special Mention at Fantasporto, where Fright Night was also nominated for Best Film.
       A 22 Dec 1984 Screen International news item announced that science fiction/fantasy publisher, Tor, acquired the novelization rights to Holland's original screenplay. Fright Night , the novel, was published in Aug 1985. Video game database GameSpot lists a Fright Night video game, released by publisher MicroDeal to the Amiga console on 1 Jan 1988. The gamer, playing as the vampire Dandrige, must locate and drain the blood victims scattered about Dandrige's house in order to survive and maintain the character's youth. The online site, Comic Collector Live, lists a Fright Night comic book, a twenty-two issue run published by Now Comics from 1 Oct 1988 through 1 Jul 1990. The video game and comic book releases preceded a feature film sequel titled Fright Night Part 2 (see entry). Written by Holland and directed by Tommy Lee Wallace, the sequel rejoins Ragsdale and McDowall.
       As of Nov 2010, maintains a ninety-three percent freshness rating on RottenTomatoes.com. A 7 Apr 2010 Var news item announced that actor Anton Yelchin was in negotiation for the lead role of Charlie Brewster, in DreamWorks Studios' remake of Fright Night , with Craig Gillespie set to direct the film from an adapted screenplay by Marti Noxon. A 11 May 2010 Dark Horizons article reported that Colin Farrell was cast in the role of Dandrige, and Australian actress Toni Collette would play Charlie's mother. A 11 May 2010 Dark Horizons article added that the setting will move out of the suburbs and into Las Vegas, where the Vincent character will be altered from a burned out horror actor into a Vegas illusionist. 19 Aug 2011 was the anticipated US release date.


The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Michael Thielvoldt, a student at University of Texas at Austin, with Tom Schatz as academic advisor.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Oct 1985.
---
Daily Variety
10 May 1985.
---
Dark Horizons
11 May 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1985
p. 3, 5.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1985
p. 8.
New York Times
2 Aug 1985
p. 8.
Screen International
22 Dec 1984.
---
Screen International
10 Aug 1985.
---
Variety
5 Dec 1984.
---
Variety
31 Jul 1985
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Tom Holland film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
Video consultant
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Addl editing
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Set des
Set const
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus ed
Music supv, Cinemusic
Music supv, Cinemusic
Music supv, Cinemusic
Electric violinist
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff prod
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Contact lens eff by
Titles & opticals by
Visual eff art dir, Entertainment Effects Group
Matte dept supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Mechanical eff supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Visual eff cam, Entertainment Effects Group
Opt supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Chief eng, Entertainment Effects Group
Chief matte artist, Entertainment Effects Group
Creatures des & created by, Entertainment Effects
Creatures des & created by, Entertainment Effects
Prod adv, Entertainment Effects Group
Prod supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Asst cam, Entertainment Effects Group
Asst cam, Entertainment Effects Group
Asst matte cam, Entertainment Effects Group
Prod illustrator, Entertainment Effects Group
Visual eff ed, Entertainment Effects Group
Matte artist, Entertainment Effects Group
Opt printer op, Entertainment Effects Group
Opt line-up, Entertainment Effects Group
Opt line-up, Entertainment Effects Group
1st tech-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects G
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Crew-Creature fx shop, Entertainment Effects Group
Head eff tech, Entertainment Effects Group
Grip, Entertainment Effects Group
Grip, Entertainment Effects Group
Gaffer, Entertainment Effects Group
Lab tech, Entertainment Effects Group
Prod coord, Entertainment Effects Group
Prod accountant, Entertainment Effects Group
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Make-up artist
Addl make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Holland
Prod asst
DGA trainee
Asst to Herb Jaffe
Asst to the prod
Unit pub
Personal asst to Mr. Holland
Transportation coord
STAND INS
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stunt coord
ANIMATION
Anim supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Anim supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Rotoscope supv, Entertainment Effects Group
Key anim, Entertainment Effects Group
SOURCES
SONGS
"Fright Night," written by Joe Lamont, produced by Seth Justman, performed by J. Geils Band, courtesy of EMI America Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Save Me Tonight," written by Mitchell Leib and Garri Brandon, produced by Dennis Churchill, Rick Chadock and Cliff Zellman, performed by White Sister
"Rock Myself to Sleep," written by Kimberly Rew and Vince De La Cruz, produced by Lance Quinn, performed by April Wine, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc. (Aquarius Records Ltd. for Canada)
+
SONGS
"Fright Night," written by Joe Lamont, produced by Seth Justman, performed by J. Geils Band, courtesy of EMI America Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Save Me Tonight," written by Mitchell Leib and Garri Brandon, produced by Dennis Churchill, Rick Chadock and Cliff Zellman, performed by White Sister
"Rock Myself to Sleep," written by Kimberly Rew and Vince De La Cruz, produced by Lance Quinn, performed by April Wine, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc. (Aquarius Records Ltd. for Canada)
"Let's Talk," written by Mark Mothersbaugh, produced by Devo, Inc., performed by Devo
"Armies of the Night," written and produced by Ron Mael and Russell Mael, performed by Sparks, courtesy of London Record Ltd.
"Good Man in a Bad Time," written by Marc Tanner and Jon Reede, produced by Mick Ronson and Ian Hunter, performed by Ian Hunter
"Give It Up," written by Dennis Matkosky and Bobby Caldwell, produced by Alan George and Fred McFarlane for Terrible Two Productions, performed by Evelyn "Champagne" King, courtesy of RCA Records
"You Can't Hide from the Beast Inside," written by Steve Plunkett, produced and performed by Autograph, courtesy of RCA Records
"Boppin' Tonight," written by Gary Goetzman and Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo and Gary Goetzman for Goetzman/Piccirillo Productions, performed by Fabulous Fontaines.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 August 1985
Production Date:
began 3 December 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 August 1985
Copyright Number:
PA265467
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Metrocolor
Duration(in mins):
106
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27790
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As Charlie Brewster makes out with his girlfriend, Amy Peterson, on television is the late-night horror series, Fright Night Theater , hosted by Peter Vincent, "the Great Vampire Killer." Amy slows Charlie's advances, using Charlie's affinity for Vincent as a distraction. When Charlie persists, she demands that he stop, which sends Charlie into a rant about his sexual frustration. However, soon the two make up and Amy suggests they get into bed, but Charlie becomes distracted by the sight of two men carrying a coffin into the vacant house next door. When Charlie's distraction persists, Amy storms out of the house. After she leaves, Charlie's mother, Mrs. Brewster, informs him that they have a new, "very attractive" neighbor. television the news reports the murder of local man. When Charlie arrives home from school the next day, he finds an attractive young woman searching for the neighbor's house and that night, he hears the sound of a woman shrieking next door. The following day, Charlie apologizes to Amy for his recent behavior. However, their reunion is cut short when Charlie recognizes the attractive woman he saw the day before pictured on a television news cast about the mutilation and murder of a prostitute, the second such victim in two days. Amy, enraged at Charlie's disregard, smashes a burger in his face. That afternoon, Charlie approaches his neighbor's house and attempts to open the cellar doors. A man, who is inside the house painting the windows black, notices Charlie, confronts him, and warns Charlie to mind his own business. That night, Charlie sits in his room watching the neighbor's house. ... +


As Charlie Brewster makes out with his girlfriend, Amy Peterson, on television is the late-night horror series, Fright Night Theater , hosted by Peter Vincent, "the Great Vampire Killer." Amy slows Charlie's advances, using Charlie's affinity for Vincent as a distraction. When Charlie persists, she demands that he stop, which sends Charlie into a rant about his sexual frustration. However, soon the two make up and Amy suggests they get into bed, but Charlie becomes distracted by the sight of two men carrying a coffin into the vacant house next door. When Charlie's distraction persists, Amy storms out of the house. After she leaves, Charlie's mother, Mrs. Brewster, informs him that they have a new, "very attractive" neighbor. television the news reports the murder of local man. When Charlie arrives home from school the next day, he finds an attractive young woman searching for the neighbor's house and that night, he hears the sound of a woman shrieking next door. The following day, Charlie apologizes to Amy for his recent behavior. However, their reunion is cut short when Charlie recognizes the attractive woman he saw the day before pictured on a television news cast about the mutilation and murder of a prostitute, the second such victim in two days. Amy, enraged at Charlie's disregard, smashes a burger in his face. That afternoon, Charlie approaches his neighbor's house and attempts to open the cellar doors. A man, who is inside the house painting the windows black, notices Charlie, confronts him, and warns Charlie to mind his own business. That night, Charlie sits in his room watching the neighbor's house. He falls asleep, but wakes in time to see a half-naked, young woman standing at the neighbor's upstairs window. An attractive man, the neighbor, approaches her from behind, and the two kiss passionately, before the neighbor bares a set of fangs. However, before he bites down, the neighbor glimpses Charlie and draws the shades. Startled, Charlie wakes his mother to tell her what he saw, but, only half-awake, she pays him no mind. Moving outside for a closer look, Charlie observes that the man who previously warned him away loads what appears to be a bagged body into a Jeep as the neighbor flies down from the second story to give the man a purse he left behind. Mrs. Brewster, now awake, calls out to her son from their front door, alerting the men to Charlie's presence. When the neighbor approaches Charlie's hiding place in the bushes, the boy bolts home. The next day, Charlie declares to his mother and Amy that the neighbor is a murderer and a vampire. When neither believes him, Charlie decides to bring his accusation of murder to the police, although he plans to exclude his claim of vampirism. When Charlie and Detective Lennox later arrive next door to question the neighbor, Jerry Dandrige, only the other man, who identifies himself as a roommate named Billy Cole, is home. Cole informs the officer that Dandrige is out of town and explains that the bag Charlie saw was trash. After uncovering what appears to be a painting of Amy, Charlie insists they investigate the basement where he predicts they will discover a coffin with the undead Dandrige inside. Outraged, Lennox drags Charlie from the residence. After Lennox leaves, Charlie realizes that dusk is approaching and hurries to the house of his friend, Evil Ed, an expert in vampires. Ed suggests Charlie protect himself with a crucifix, garlic, and the knowledge that a vampire cannot enter a residence without the owner's consent. That night, Charlie's mother calls him downstairs to meet Dandrige, who she has invited in for a drink. During their introduction, Dandrige says that, having received a formal invitation, he intends to visit "all the time." Charlie stumbles away terrified and retreats back to his room. Later that night Dandrige returns to kill Charlie. After ruffing up the boy, Dandrige forces Charlie half-way out a window with the intent of impaling him on the fence below. Struggling and desperate, Charlie stabs Dandridge with a pencil, causing the vampire to stumble back in pain. When Dandrige turns back he has transformed into a hideous visage of his former self, with fangs, aged red skin, and demonic orange eyes. The enraged Dandrige composes himself, however, upon hearing the call of Charlie's awakened mother, and flees the house. After Charlie's mother returns to bed with his assurance that all is well, he receives a phone call from Dandrige informing him that he will finish off Charlie the following night. After the phone call, Charlie is left frozen with fear watching Fright Night . Host Vincent's self-aggrandizing inspires Charlie to seek out the proclaimed "Great Vampire Killer," for help. The following day, Charlie approaches Vincent, who has just been fired from his recently cancelled series, and asks Vincent to help him kill Dandrige. Vincent, believing Charlie mad, tears off in his car. When Amy and Evil Ed check on Charlie, they find him planning to kill Dandrige. Amy convinces Charlie to hold off until after she seeks Vincent's help and she pays Vincent to help cure Charlie's "delusion." Ed suggests Vincent perform a test to prove to Charlie that Dandrige is not a vampire. Dandrige agrees to the request, which is to drink tap water that Charlie believes is holy water, in order to lure Charlie to him. Charlie, Amy, Ed and Vincent arrive at Dandrige's house just after nightfall. Upon meeting the group, Dandrige playfully flirts with Amy. When Dandrige passes the test, Charlie concludes that the water was not actually blessed, but he ceases his persistence at Dandrige's subtle hint that it may result in the demise of his friends. On their way out, Vincent notices that Dandrige has no reflection, a shocking observation that causes him to drop and break his mirrored cigarette case. Vincent attributes the blunder to clumsiness and quickly shepherds the teens outside. Once outside, he admits what he saw but refuses to stick around any longer, leaving Charlie to escort the others home alone. Inside the house, Dandrige discovers a broken sliver of mirror, and pursues the teens. He comes upon Ed, who has branched off from the group despite Charlie's warnings, and turns him into a vampire. Dandrige then chases Charlie and Amy into a crowded nightclub, where they phone the police. Meanwhile, Ed visits Vincent, reveals that he is a vampire and attacks. In the scuffle, Vincent brandishes a crucifix, which he burns into Ed's forehead before exiling the vampire from the premises. At the nightclub, Charlie phones Vincent for help after the police dismiss his call. While Charlie is on the phone, Dandrige enters the club and mesmerizes Amy, drawing her away from Charlie and into a seductive dance. When Charlie disrupts the dance, Dandrige tells him to bring Vincent to his house, if he ever wants to see Amy again. Dandrige then attempts to leave the club with Amy, but a bouncer stops him. Losing his temper, Dandrige attacks two bouncer, incites a stampede and makes off with Amy in the chaos. Charlie goes to Vincent, and asks him to help save Amy, but Vincent refuses. Amy awakes at Dandrige's home, where Dandrige informs her that the woman in the portrait was someone he knew long ago, then bites her. Charlie arrives at Dandrige's home ready to do battle alone, when Vincent shows up to help. The two enter the house where Dandrige tells them, "Welcome to Fright Night for real." The vampire says Amy is still alive, but they will have to get through him in order to save her. Charlie flourishes a crucifix, which temporarily repels Dandrige, until Cole emerges and knocks out Charlie. Alone and helpless, Vincent abandons the boy and retreats to Charlie's house. Upon finding the phone lines cut, he climbs the stairs to Mrs. Brewster's room, where he learns from the waiting Ed that she is working late. Vincent flees, but stumbles and Ed, in the form of a wolf, lunges at the fallen Vincent, who pierces the beast through its heart with a broken table leg and sends it over the upstairs railing. Ed thrashes violently below as he shifts back into human form and dies. Next door, Dandrige locks Charlie and an unconscious Amy in a room. Arming the boy with a wooden stake, Dandrige says Charlie will need it just before dawn, alerting Charlie that Amy is a vampire. Vincent returns to Dandrige's home, and rescues Charlie, who shows him that Amy is changing. Relying on his movie knowledge about vampires, Vincent says that, if they kill Dandrige before dawn, they can reverse Amy's condition. Setting out to confront Dandrige, they are first met by Cole, who Vincent promptly shoots in the head. When Dandrige emerges, Charlie weakens him with a crucifix and urges Vincent to finish him, saying they “have him." However, Dandrige, gazing upon the fallen body of Cole, asks, "Do you?" before retreating. As Charlie and Vincent ponder what Dandrige meant, Cole rises and ascends the stairs toward them. Vincent unloads the remaining rounds into Cole, but Cole continues advancing until Charlie stakes him through the heart. With Cole truly dead, the two seek out Dandrige, who is on the roof summoning Amy to wake and kill Charlie and Vincent. Realizing Amy is awake and dangerous, Vincent locks her in a room. Then Dandrige crashes through an upstairs window, ready to finish off the two himself. Vincent uses a crucifix to distract Dandrige long enough for the coming dawn to scorch his shoulder. Dandrige then transforms into a bat-like monster and attacks Vincent, who manages to hold off the creature, but it bites Charlie before retreating into the basement. In the basement, Charlie and Vincent separate when Amy appears. Charlie battles Amy, while Vincent unearth's Dandrige's coffin and stakes the vampire through the heart. However, Dandrige survives the staking, and Charlie and Vincent resort to breaking the basement windows to flood the room with sunlight. Dandrige corners Vincent against a darkened wall, but Charlie comes to the rescue and rips a curtain away from a nearby window, blanketing Dandrige in sunlight, causing him to burst into flames. With the vampire destroyed, Amy returns to her human state. Later, at night, Charlie and Amy are back to necking is his bedroom. On the television, Vincent introduces an alien slasher picture on the restored Fright Night Theater . When Charlie gets up to turn off the television set, he glimpses what he briefly suspects to be glowing red eyes in Dandrige's former house. Charlie dismisses his suspicion and returns to Amy. Unheard by either teen, Evil Ed lets out an eerie laugh. +

Legend
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Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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