The Lost Boys (1987)

R | 97 mins | Drama, Horror | 1987

Producer:

Harvey Bernhard

Cinematographer:

Michael Chapman

Editor:

Robert Brown

Production Designer:

Bo Welch

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

A 5 Mar 1985 Var news item announced that the independent production/distribution company Producers Sales Organization (PSO) bought first-time screenwriters Janice Fischer and James Jeremias's Lost Boys script for $400,000 in a deal engineered by agent Nan Blitzman of J. Michael Bloom Ltd. A 20 Feb 1986 Var article reported that PSO announced their acquisition of the project at American Film Market 1985. Later Warner Bros. joined the project, taking over domestic distribution and some foreign territories.
       According to a 20 Feb 1986 Var news item, Richard Franklin, director of Psycho II and Cloak & Dagger (see entries), was at one time “reportedly in line to direct.” A Feb 1999 Venice Magazine interview with director Joel Shumacher, noted that executive producer Richard Donner was originally set to direct. Ultimately, however, Donner moved on to direct Lethal Weapon (see entry) and handed the reins over to Schumacher.
       In his book, The Changing Vampire of Film and Television , author Tim Kane noted that in the original script the main characters were fifth and sixth grade school children, the Frog brothers were eight-year-old Cub Scouts, and “Star” was a boy. Having just directed the successful kids’ adventure film, Goonies (see entry), Donner originally intended to make The Lost Boys in the same vein. Kane claims that Schumacher made the age changes and switched Star into a female love interest for Michael and that scriptwriter Jeffery Boam was primarily responsible for the film’s sexy, hip tone.
       A 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article claimed Keenan Wynn and John ... More Less

A 5 Mar 1985 Var news item announced that the independent production/distribution company Producers Sales Organization (PSO) bought first-time screenwriters Janice Fischer and James Jeremias's Lost Boys script for $400,000 in a deal engineered by agent Nan Blitzman of J. Michael Bloom Ltd. A 20 Feb 1986 Var article reported that PSO announced their acquisition of the project at American Film Market 1985. Later Warner Bros. joined the project, taking over domestic distribution and some foreign territories.
       According to a 20 Feb 1986 Var news item, Richard Franklin, director of Psycho II and Cloak & Dagger (see entries), was at one time “reportedly in line to direct.” A Feb 1999 Venice Magazine interview with director Joel Shumacher, noted that executive producer Richard Donner was originally set to direct. Ultimately, however, Donner moved on to direct Lethal Weapon (see entry) and handed the reins over to Schumacher.
       In his book, The Changing Vampire of Film and Television , author Tim Kane noted that in the original script the main characters were fifth and sixth grade school children, the Frog brothers were eight-year-old Cub Scouts, and “Star” was a boy. Having just directed the successful kids’ adventure film, Goonies (see entry), Donner originally intended to make The Lost Boys in the same vein. Kane claims that Schumacher made the age changes and switched Star into a female love interest for Michael and that scriptwriter Jeffery Boam was primarily responsible for the film’s sexy, hip tone.
       A 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article claimed Keenan Wynn and John Carradine were both approached to play the role of “Grandpa,” before Bernard Hughes was cast. However, according to the article, Wynn died just before filming began and Carradine was too ill to take the role.
       A 15 Jul 1986 HR production chart stated that the film was shot in Santa Cruz and Los Angeles. The production took advantage of Santa Cruz’s famed boardwalk, which was a major setting in the film. Production notes indicated that the project signed 2,000 extras for several nights' work while shooting in Santa Cruz and also indicated that Grandpa's lodge-style home was the Pogonip Country Club, built in 1921. The country club's name "Pogonip" was the Shoshone tribal name for the area's dense fog, which is prominently featured in the film. A 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article clarified that the interiors of the house, as well as those of the lost boy’s cavernous lair, were shot on Warner Bros. studio stages twelve and fifteen in Burbank, CA. Schumacher and production designer Bo Welch, who previously won an Academy Award for his work on the 1985 film, The Color Purple , combined real and familiar elements with “surreal and bizarre” elements to create unsettling environments. One example of this is the vampires’ lair, which was conceived as a Victorian-era hotel lobby that had sunken into a fault during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Schumacher explained that decorating the set with elements from varying time periods reconciled the film's modern vampires with their mythical past.
       Costume designer Susan Becker, who had worked previously with Schumacher on St. Elmo's Fire (see entry), took a similar approach to the costuming. Becker used clothing from various eras, including a Victorian bellboy's jacket and 1950s motorcycle gear, to construct the vampires’ wardrobes. She described the end product as "sinister and timeless."
       Dream Quest Images created the film's special effects. Dream Quest combined blue screen techniques with state of the art computerized motion control that, according to visual effects director Eric Brevig, involved lighting changes, camera movement, and optical composites to achieve the complex visual effects asked for by Schumacher. Brevig emphasized the laboriousness of the effects process, specifically identifying a sequence in the final showdown in which a vampire crashes into a stereo system. Brevig claimed that the effects for a ten-second sequence required “two solid weeks” to design and stage. Schumacher, a self-declared fan of vampire narratives, wanted to "do something original" with the "time-honored [vampire] tradition," and, in the process, "have fun" with the picture without resorting to camp.
       The majority of the young cast members were relative unknowns. Corey Feldman was the exception, having previously appeared in The Goonies , Gremlins , the critically acclaimed Stand By Me , and two Friday the 13th sequels (see entries), most notably. In a 11 Mar 2010 Total Film news item, Schumacher specified that the studio had never heard of Kiefer Sutherland, Jason Patric, Jamie Gertz, or Corey Haim. According to various contemporary sources, including a 29 Jul 2007 NYT article, The Lost Boys made Haim and Feldman household names. Known as “The Two Coreys” or simply “The Coreys,” Haim and Feldmen became a teen idol duo and appeared together in roughly a dozen films, including License to Drive , Dream a Little Dream , and Blown Away over the span of a decade (see entries). After rocky adult careers and drug-related issues, Haim and Feldman reunited on the short-lived A&E Network program, The Two Coreys , in 2007. The show was an Odd Couple -style reality program in which the slovenly and unemployed Haim moved in with the neat and married Feldman.
       According to a 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article, Haim suffered from pneumonia during part of The Lost Boys shoot, and Kiefer Sutherland broke his wrist while performing a motorcycle stunt. As a result, Sutherland wears black leather gloves through most of the film to hide the injury. Additionally, an 18 Aug 1986 Var news item reported that around 300,000 flies escaped during the filming of a scene. The production called in an exterminator to deal with the infestation after flies began appearing in dailies for scenes in which flies were not originally supposed to appear.
       According to statistics on Box Office Mojo the film debuted at number two, pulling in $5,236,318 on 1,027 screens its opening weekend. The film’s total domestic gross was $32,22,567, a healthy earning, particularly for an R-rated horror film.
       Critical reception was generally positive, though often with reservations. In a 31 Jul 1987 Washington Post review, Rita Kempley called the film “an off-key but often funny mix of teen romance and preteen adventure,” however added, “But this faltering fantasy has more in common with ‘The Goonies’ than with really first-rate vampire lore.” In a 31 Jul 1987 Washington Post review, Desson Howe praised cinematographer Michael Chapman’s camerawork, specifically the “eerie planes of light and dark” and “batlike” swooping camera. Additionally, Howe applauded the “hybrid horror and suburban comedy” quality established in the first half of the story. However, Howe bemoaned the loss of this quality later in the narrative, where he argues that “the film loses courage (or imagination).” Roger Ebert echoed these sentiments in his 31 Jul 1987 Chicago Sun-Times review, where he declared: “There’s some good stuff in the movie, including a cast that’s good right down the line and a willingness to have some fun with teenage culture in the Mass Murder Capital. But when everything is all over, there’s nothing to leave the theater with—no real horrors, no real dread, no real imagination—just technique at the service of formula.”
       The Lost Boys received significant attention from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, winning the 1988 Best Horror Film award as well as nominations for costuming, make-up, Best Performance by a Young Actor (Haim), and Best Supporting Actor (Hughes). Additionally, Feldman won Young Artist Awards for Best Young Actor in a Horror Motion Picture and Teenage Favorite Horror/Drama Motion Picture, while Haim was nominated alongside Feldman for the Best Young Actor in a Horror Motion Picture category.
       The film held seventy-five percent Rotten Tomatoes “freshness” rating (based on forty reviews) as of Dec 2010. Along with an eighty-fiver percent audience score and a rank of number fourteen on Rotten Tomatoes “25 Best Reviewed Vampire Movies” list.
       Craig Shaw Gardner wrote the novelization of the screenplay, which was published by Berkeley on 1 Aug 1987. According to a 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article, the novel included many scenes that did not make it to the screen and expanded the vampire lore to include details like vampires’ inability to cross running water. On Garner’s website, the author stated the book was his first novelization and his most “collectable” book to date.
       On 15 May 2008, WildStorm published the first book in a four-issue comic book spinoff miniseries titled Lost Boys: Rein of Frogs . Written by Hans Rodionoff with artwork by Joel Gomez, the individual issues were compiled and republished as a graphic novel on 24 Feb 2009. According to Amazon product information, the story centers on the Frog Brothers and bridges The Lost Boys with the 2008 sequel, Lost Boys: The Tribe.
       A 5 Jun 2008 HR news item announced that Warner Premiere was preparing a direct-to-DVD and Blue-ray sequel, titled Lost Boys: The Tribe , set for a 29 Jul 2008 debut. The news item identified the sequel, which featured returning cast members Feldman and Haim, as an "homage" to the original film. Jamison Newlander also reprised his role as Alan Frog, but his scenes were edited out of the final film. They are viewable as deleted scenes on the DVD release. A third installment, titled Lost Boys: The Thirst , was released direct-to-video in the US on 12 Oct 2010 under the Warner Home Video banner. The film reunited Feldman and Newlander as the Frog Brothers. However, Haim did not return for the project. He passed away 10 Mar 2010. According to a 11 Mar 2010 Total Film article and The Lost Boys DVD extras, Schumacher reportedly pitched a sequel titled Lost Girls but, despite the director’s numerous efforts to get the project off the ground, the project was never picked up.


The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Michael Thielvoldt, a student at University of Texas at Austin, with Tom Schatz as academic advisor.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Sun-Times
31 Jul 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1987
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 2008.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1987
p. 10.
New York Times
31 Jul 1987
p. 21.
New York Times
20 Jul 2007.
---
Total Film
11 Mar 2010.
---
Variety
5 Mar 1985.
---
Variety
20 Feb 1986.
---
Variety
18 Aug 1986.
---
Variety
22 Jul 1987
p. 12.
Venice Magazine
Feb 1999.
---
Washington Post
31 Jul 1987.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Richard Donner production
A Joel Schumacher film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir, 2d unit
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
Co-exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Aerial photog, 2d unit
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Gaffer, 2d unit
Elec best boy
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Key grip, 2d unit
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Still photog
Filmed in
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Lead person
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Standby painter
Greens foreman
Greens asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Women's cost supv
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus consultant
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Sd editing asst
Processed sd eff
Foley
VISUAL EFFECTS
Vampire prosthetics & eff by
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals by
Spec visual eff by
Visual eff des and supv
Spec eff photog
Spec eff photog
Opt supv
Opt compositing
Opt compositing
Eff des consultant
Eff des consultant
Motion control supv
Motion control tech
Motion control tech
Motion control tech
Matte artist
Element controller
Visual eff prod mgr
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
Cannom eff crew
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Research
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Prod assoc
Asst to Joel Schumacher
Exec asst to Richard Donner
Asst to Harvey Bernhard
Secy for Joel Schumacher
Secy to Richard Donner
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Craft service
Welfare worker
Helicopter pilot, 2d unit
Contact lens consultant
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
SOURCES
SONGS
"Lost in the Shadows (The Lost Boys)," written and performed by Lou Gramm, produced by Pat Moran and Lou Gramm
"Good Times," written by George Young and Harry Vanda, performed by INXS and Jimmy Barnes, produced by Mark Opitz, re-produced by Bob Clearmountain, Jimmy Barnes courtesy of Geffen Records and Mushroom Records, INXS courtesy of Atlantic Records, Polygram International B. V. and WEA Records Pty. Ltd.
"Laying Down the Law," written by Michael Hutchence, Andrew Farriss, Jon Farriss, Kirk Pengilly, Garry Gary Beers and Jimmy Barnes, performed by INXS and Jimmy Barnes, produced by Mark Opitz, re-produced by Chris Thomas, Jimmy Barnes courtesy of Geffen Records and Mushroom Records, INXS courtesy of Atlantic Records, Polygram International B. V. and WEA Records Pty. Ltd.
+
SONGS
"Lost in the Shadows (The Lost Boys)," written and performed by Lou Gramm, produced by Pat Moran and Lou Gramm
"Good Times," written by George Young and Harry Vanda, performed by INXS and Jimmy Barnes, produced by Mark Opitz, re-produced by Bob Clearmountain, Jimmy Barnes courtesy of Geffen Records and Mushroom Records, INXS courtesy of Atlantic Records, Polygram International B. V. and WEA Records Pty. Ltd.
"Laying Down the Law," written by Michael Hutchence, Andrew Farriss, Jon Farriss, Kirk Pengilly, Garry Gary Beers and Jimmy Barnes, performed by INXS and Jimmy Barnes, produced by Mark Opitz, re-produced by Chris Thomas, Jimmy Barnes courtesy of Geffen Records and Mushroom Records, INXS courtesy of Atlantic Records, Polygram International B. V. and WEA Records Pty. Ltd.
"Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me," written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, performed by Roger Daltrey, produced by Beau Hill, courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records
"People Are Strange," written by The Doors, performed by Echo and the Bunnymen, produced by Ray Manzarek, courtesy of WEA Records
"Cry Little Sister (Theme from The Lost Boys)," written by Michael Mainieri and Gerard McMann, performed by Gerard McMann, produced by Michael Mainieri, co-produced by Gerard McMann and Bruce Martin
"I Still Believe," written by Michael Been and James Goodwin, performed by Tim Cappello, produced by Richie Zito
"Power Play," written by Brian A. Robertson and Phil Pickett, performed by Eddie and the Tide, produced by B. A. Robertson, courtesy of Atlantic Records
"Beauty Has Her Way," written by David Banks and Paul Brook, performed by Mummy Calls, courtesy of Geffen Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Walk This Way," written by Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, performed by Run-D.M.C., courtesy of Profile Records
"Ain't Got No Home," written by Clarence Henry, performed by Clarence "Frogman" Henry, courtesy of Dominion Entertainment, Inc.
"Groovin'" written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati, performed by The Rascals, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Some Other Day," written by Danny Gould
"Crazy Old Soldier," performed by Troy Seals, written by Troy Seals and Paul Kennerly, courtesy of Warner Bros. Music.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 31 July 1987
Production Date:
began 2 June 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 March 1988
Copyright Number:
PA368567
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28541
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At night, a gang of young ruffians harasses the public at Santa Carla, California’s boardwalk amusement park, forcing a security guard to banish them. Later, when the guard is alone, something swoops out of the sky and violently plucks him from the parking lot. During daylight hours, recently divorced Lucy moves her sons, Michael and Sam, and the family dog, Nanook, from Phoenix to live with her eccentric father. They drive past Santa Carla’s “welcome” billboard, on which the slogan, "Murder Capital of the World," is graffitied on the back, and continue to Grandpa’s place on the outskirts of town. Grandpa’s home is a showcase for the old man’s taxidermy hobby and the dead specimens repel Sam, the younger brother. Sam also complains that Grandpa has no television and therefore no MTV, but Michael reminds him they are there because they are “flat broke.” That night at the beach, Michael leaves his younger brother at a concert to follow a mysterious young woman, while his mother wanders the boardwalk in search of employment. She passes a flyer for the "Missing" security guard before coming upon a little lost boy. After reuniting the boy with his mother inside the local video store, she meets the store's owner, Max, and his dog, Thorn. Max takes an interest in Lucy, seeing her "generous nature," and offers her a job. At the boardwalk comic book shop, two adolescent shop clerks, Edgar and Alan Frog, give Sam a comic book titled, Vampires Everywhere! , which, they tell him, could save his life. When Sam and Michael later meet on the boardwalk, they watch as the mysterious young woman climbs ... +


At night, a gang of young ruffians harasses the public at Santa Carla, California’s boardwalk amusement park, forcing a security guard to banish them. Later, when the guard is alone, something swoops out of the sky and violently plucks him from the parking lot. During daylight hours, recently divorced Lucy moves her sons, Michael and Sam, and the family dog, Nanook, from Phoenix to live with her eccentric father. They drive past Santa Carla’s “welcome” billboard, on which the slogan, "Murder Capital of the World," is graffitied on the back, and continue to Grandpa’s place on the outskirts of town. Grandpa’s home is a showcase for the old man’s taxidermy hobby and the dead specimens repel Sam, the younger brother. Sam also complains that Grandpa has no television and therefore no MTV, but Michael reminds him they are there because they are “flat broke.” That night at the beach, Michael leaves his younger brother at a concert to follow a mysterious young woman, while his mother wanders the boardwalk in search of employment. She passes a flyer for the "Missing" security guard before coming upon a little lost boy. After reuniting the boy with his mother inside the local video store, she meets the store's owner, Max, and his dog, Thorn. Max takes an interest in Lucy, seeing her "generous nature," and offers her a job. At the boardwalk comic book shop, two adolescent shop clerks, Edgar and Alan Frog, give Sam a comic book titled, Vampires Everywhere! , which, they tell him, could save his life. When Sam and Michael later meet on the boardwalk, they watch as the mysterious young woman climbs onto a motorcycle and rides off with the ruffian gang. Elsewhere, a woman reads comics in the backseat of a car, batting away her boyfriend's advances. The two are interrupted when something tears off the car's roof and rips the couple into the night sky. Sometime later, when Sam returns to the comic shop, the clerks ask if he has noticed anything unusual about Santa Carla. Revealing they are vampire hunters, they explain that Santa Carla is overrun by the undead and give Sam another vampire comic with their number written on the back. They advise him to pray that he never needs them. On the boardwalk, Star, the mysterious young woman, approaches Michael as he is shopping. As they prepare to leave together on Michael's motorcycle,the gang rides up on their motorcycles. Star opts to ride with the gang’s leader, David, who challenges Michael to "keep up." Michael keeps pace with the gang as they speed their way toward Mount's Bluff, where Michael and David race in the fog toward the edge of a cliff. However, Michael bails out when he realizes the danger. Upon seeing the crashing waves below, Michael punches David and challenges him to a one-on-one fight. In reply, David asks, "How far are you willing to go, Michael?" The gang then takes Michael to their lair, where they offer him food, drink, and marijuana. At one point, David suggests that the rice Michael is eating is maggots, and when Michael looks down he sees maggots in his Chinese food box. However, after spitting out his bite, Michael discovers the maggots have turned back to rice. Later David swigs red liquid from a bottle before handing it to Michael and invites him to drink it and become one of them. Despite Star's warnings that the liquid is blood, Michael drinks and the gang celebrates their new recruit. They take Michael to a train bridge, where they hang, suspended over a canyon. Michael panics when the train arrives and gang members begin dropping into the foggy void below. He refuses to follow David's advice to "let go." The last one left, Michael attempts to lift himself back up to the tracks, but his strength gives out. He drops down into the fog, but does not die. Instead, he is awakened late the next day in his bed when his mother calls him from the video store. She asks him to stay home with Sam that night, so she can go to dinner with Max. That evening, Michael and Sam are alone in the house when the sound of motorcycle engines floods the residence, accompanied by beaming lights and strong winds. Michael hears David's voice calling to him, but when he opens the front door the commotion ceases. Later that night Nanook bites Michael when he opens the bathroom door while Sam is taking a bath. When Sam emerges, Michael tells him that Nanook was protecting him. Sam then observes that Michael's reflection in the mirror is fading and concludes that Michael is a vampire. Fearful of his brother, Sam locks himself in his bedroom and phones the Frog brothers. The clerks recommend he stake Michael through the heart, but Sam refuses. Meanwhile, Michael begins levitating uncontrollably and clings desperately to the phone receiver as he floats out the window. Lucy, having just called home to check on the boys, hears Sam’s screams. As she rushes home, Michael and Sam reconcile. When she arrives, Sam lies about the screams in order to protect his brother and Michael sneaks off on his motorcycle. Meanwhile, Max returns home after his curtailed date with Lucy. At his front door, a bat-shaped kite flies into him, and when he turns toward the street, his yard lights go out as motorcycle headlights flash, accompanied by the sound of the gang's hooting and engine revving. When Michael returns to the gang's lair in search of Star, he asks her what is happening to him. She says she cannot answer and, instead, makes love with him. At dawn, the gang returns to the lair, and Michael returns home, where he observes that the dog bite from the night before has already healed. At home, Lucy tries to talk to Michael, but he claims he is tired. Lucy visits Max's house to deliver a bottle of wine, as an apology for abruptly ending their date. However, as she approaches the house, Thorn attacks and she runs, barely escaping a mauling. Sam visits the Frogs and they again advise him to kill his brother. Sam opts instead to track down and kill the "head vampire," an act that will make Michael human again. Sam theorizes that Max could be the head vampire, based on similarities he sees between him and the vampires in his comics. To make up for cancelling their date, Lucy invites Max for dinner. When Max arrives, he insists Michael invite him in before he will enter. Neither Michael nor Grandpa stay for the meal. Instead, Michael heads out into the night, while Grandpa eats his food in another room and watches the group surreptitiously. The dinner party consists of Lucy, Max, Sam and the Frog brothers, who were invited by Sam to investigate Max. During the dinner Sam and the Frogs feed Max raw garlic, splash him with holy water, turn out the lights to see if he glows, and hold a mirror up to catch his reflection. Because Max passes all the tests, the boys conclude that he is not a vampire. Meanwhile, Michael looks for Star and when he finds the gang at the boardwalk, David tells him that if he wants to see her, he must go with them. They take Michael to a bonfire party, where the gang proceeds to slaughter and feed on the partygoers. The horrified Michael refuses to join in and afterward David tells him that, like them, he will never grow old or die, but he must feed. When Michael returns home, Star visits and informs him that she and her child companion, Laddie, are different than the others because they have yet to make their first kills. She says that Michael was supposed to be her first kill, but she resisted because of her feelings for him. After begging him to resist the urge to kill, she flies off. The next day Michael, Sam, and the Frog Brothers visit the lair, intent on staking the gang and freeing Michael, Star, and Laddie. Once inside, the Frog brothers lead Sam into a cave where they find the gang hanging like bats from the ceiling. When Edgar stakes one of the vampires the others wake, and Sam and the Frogs, with Michael, Star and Laddie, narrowly escape David's attack. At Grandpa’s house, while Michael, Star, and Laddie sleep the daytime slumber of the undead, Sam approaches his mother for help. However, when she dismisses his claims, Sam and the Frog Brothers prepare for a showdown with the gang. After stocking up on garlic and holy water, they trick Grandpa into thinking he has a date with a local widow and he drives off tooting the novelty horn on his vehicle. Lucy goes out with Max, so after the adults are gone, the teenagers wait for sunset. The vampire gang arrives promptly with the dark, and they easily infiltrate the house. Inside, the scattered vampire killers face off in factions against individual vampires. The Frog Brothers splash one vampire with holy water, as Nanook knocks him into a tub full of the holy water spiced with garlic. The water melts the vampire and destroys the house's plumbing in the process. In the living room Sam splashes another vampire with a garlic-infused holy water from a squirt gun, finishing off the creature with an arrow through the heart. Sam reunites with the Frog Brothers in an upstairs bedroom, where they recount their victories. The self-congratulation is interrupted, however, when Laddie bursts through a nearby bed with his fangs bared. The Frogs and Sam attack him, but Star intervenes, insisting he is “just a little boy." Meanwhile, Michael and David face off in the living room, where they engage in an aerial battle, each trying to slam the other onto the antlers of Grandpa’s stuffed animal heads that decorate the walls. During the battle, David says he does not want to kill Michael and urges him to join the gang, but Michael refuses and, instead, impales David on a set of antlers. After David dies, Michael remains a vampire, which leads Sam and the Frogs to conclude that there is a remaining vampire. Just then, Lucy and Max return from their date and find the house in shambles. While Sam tries to explain the mess to his mother, Max looks at David's staked corpse and apologizes to Lucy, taking the blame by claiming that his boys “misbehaved.” After revealing he is the head vampire, Max explains that inviting a vampire into one's house renders detection tests useless and he recounts his failed plan to conjoin his "family" of young vampires with Lucy's. Though his initial plans failed, Max still wants Lucy. Hearing this, Michael launches at Max, who easily repels his attack, as well as subsequent attempts by Star and the Frog Brothers. When Max takes Sam hostage, Lucy surrenders, but just as Max is about to bite into her neck, the novelty horn of Grandpa's jeep sounds. Grandpa crashes into the house and launches through Max a large wooden stake he has attached to the vehicle. The vampire is flung into the fireplace where he appropriately bursts into flames. Michael, Star, and Laddie revert to human, and Grandpa declares: "One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach…All the damn vampires." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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