Father of the Bride (1991)

PG | 100 mins | Romantic comedy | 20 December 1991

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HISTORY

       The picture begins with Steve Martin’s character, “George Banks,” sitting alone in the aftermath of his daughter “Annie’s” wedding. Speaking to the audience, George describes the back-story of his daughter’s marriage, and his fear of “letting her go.” George’s voice-over narration continues intermittently throughout the movie.
       The film is a remake of Father of the Bride (1950, see entry), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett, and Elizabeth Taylor.
       The 1991 Father of the Bride was adapted as a vehicle for actor Steve Martin, who had just achieved box-office success with Ron Howard’s Parenthood (1989, see entry). A 15 Dec 1991 NYT article and 22 Oct 1990 Var news item explained that Howard Rosenman at Sandollar Productions spent eighteen months in negotiations with industry mogul Ted Turner, who owned M-G-M’s film catalog. Rosenman eventually purchased screen rights for $100,000 and secured Tri-Star Pictures as its distributor, but the studio backed out when Turner expected to retain television broadcast rights. In response, Rosenman brought the property to The Walt Disney Company’s Touchstone Pictures. Disney obtained Turner’s approval by offering him a cable television deal.
       Steve Martin was offered the starring role early in development, and the actor encouraged Disney to hire the writer-director-producer team of Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer. The couple met in the late-1970s and collaborated on the hit film Private Benjamin (1980, see entry), which they wrote and produced with Harvey Miller. According to NYT, the success of Private Benjamin prompted the Meyers-Shyer team to seek full control of their projects, and from ... More Less

       The picture begins with Steve Martin’s character, “George Banks,” sitting alone in the aftermath of his daughter “Annie’s” wedding. Speaking to the audience, George describes the back-story of his daughter’s marriage, and his fear of “letting her go.” George’s voice-over narration continues intermittently throughout the movie.
       The film is a remake of Father of the Bride (1950, see entry), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett, and Elizabeth Taylor.
       The 1991 Father of the Bride was adapted as a vehicle for actor Steve Martin, who had just achieved box-office success with Ron Howard’s Parenthood (1989, see entry). A 15 Dec 1991 NYT article and 22 Oct 1990 Var news item explained that Howard Rosenman at Sandollar Productions spent eighteen months in negotiations with industry mogul Ted Turner, who owned M-G-M’s film catalog. Rosenman eventually purchased screen rights for $100,000 and secured Tri-Star Pictures as its distributor, but the studio backed out when Turner expected to retain television broadcast rights. In response, Rosenman brought the property to The Walt Disney Company’s Touchstone Pictures. Disney obtained Turner’s approval by offering him a cable television deal.
       Steve Martin was offered the starring role early in development, and the actor encouraged Disney to hire the writer-director-producer team of Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer. The couple met in the late-1970s and collaborated on the hit film Private Benjamin (1980, see entry), which they wrote and produced with Harvey Miller. According to NYT, the success of Private Benjamin prompted the Meyers-Shyer team to seek full control of their projects, and from that time on, their screenplays, including Irreconcilable Differences (1984, see entry) and Baby Boom (1987, see entry), were directed by Shyer and produced or executive produced by Meyers.
       Although Meyers and Shyer were the screenwriters of the remake, their onscreen writing credits are preceded by those of Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, the authors of the 1950 version. Various contemporary sources, including the 9 Dec 1991 DV review, claimed that the 1990 version of Father of the Bride shared only the framing story from the original 1950 picture. However, the 20 Dec 1991 LAT review reported that the remake included an abundance of dialogue lifted from the 1950 script, and therefore Meyers and Shyer were credited after the original writers. A review in the 20 Dec 1991 NYT stated that the characters and jokes were conspicuously “updated” to reflect 1990s popular culture, including an absence of alcoholism and a promotion of women’s equality, but the “most memorable moments” of the 1950 film were preserved.
       On 16 Oct 1990, an HR production chart stated that principal photography was set to begin 10 Dec 1990 in Los Angeles, CA, but filming was pushed back to 15 Apr 1991, according to a 16 Apr 1991 HR production chart. Both charts listed James Orr and Jim Cruikshank as writers, but neither are credited onscreen as writers. However, they are listed as executive producers. While the 16 Oct 1990 HR production chart stated that Orr was the film’s director, it is unlikely that he was hired for this position.
       As noted in AMPAS library production files, exterior locations included two homes in Pasadena, CA, one for the front of the Banks home and another for the family’s backyard. Permission to film in Pasadena was contested by many residents, who had not allowed production crews in upscale neighborhoods since Pillow Talk (1959, see entry). However, the name recognition of the film and its stars, Steve Martin and Diane Keaton, encouraged 115 homeowners to support the production with a petition of consent.
       The wedding scenes were shot at the Trinity Baptist Church in Santa Monica, CA, and the home of “Bryan MacKenzie’s” parents was filmed in the Bel Air district of Los Angeles. The scene in which Steve Martin’s character is pushed into a swimming pool by two Doberman pinschers was shot in a Malibu, CA, estate. The sequence required over ten takes for the dogs to perform on command, and the mansion was selected after viewing more than 300 options. Wedding planner “Franck Eggelhoffer’s” showroom was located on Melrose Place in West Hollywood. Interiors were filmed on sound stages at CBS/MTM in Studio City, CA. According to various Var production charts, principal photography ended in early-Jul 1991.
       Twelve days before production began, a 3 Apr 1991 LAT news item announced that actress Phoebe Cates lost her role as bride-to-be “Annie Banks” due to her pregnancy. At that time, the filmmakers had not cast a replacement, and had extended their search to England. The 15 Dec 1991 NYT article reported that Nancy Meyers asked young women about their relationship with their fathers during the casting process, and Kimberly Williams was one of the few girls who claimed she was very close with her dad. Father of the Bride marked Williams’s first theatrically released feature film.
       Various contemporary sources, including production notes and a 21 Oct 1991 People magazine news item, noted that the wedding dress was modeled after actress Grace Kelly’s real-life wedding gown. On the day of the film’s release, 20 Dec 1991, LAT announced that replicas of the dress were for sale at the store “Renee Strauss For The Bride” in Beverly Hills, CA. Strauss reportedly played a cameo role in the picture, but she is not credited onscreen.
       Despite negative reviews, the film was successful at the box-office, earning an estimated $15.5 million in its first ten days of release, according to a 30 Dec 1991 LAT article.

      End credits state: “The producers wish to thank Spode.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 1991
p. 6, 42.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 1992
p. 3, 67.
Los Angeles Times
3 Apr 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1991
Section F, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
30 Dec 1991.
---
New York Times
15 Dec 1991
p. 11, 16.
New York Times
20 Dec 1991
p. 17.
People
21 Oct 1991.
---
Variety
22 Oct 1990
p. 1, 92.
Variety
16 Dec 1991
pp. 57-58.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
a Sandy Gallin production
a Nancy Meyers/Charles Shyer film
in association Touchwood Pacific Partners I
produced in association with Sandollar Productions
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl cam op
Addl 1st asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Arriflex® cameras and lenses provided by
Prod and distributed on
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst film ed
2d asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Set des
Set des
Leadperson
Greensperson
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Women's costumer
Men's costumer
Men's costumer
Steve Martin's costumer
MUSIC
Asst mus ed
Mus pre-records prod by
Mus scoring mixer
Mus scoring mixer
Mus scoring mixer
Mus contractor
Supv copyist
Mus consultant
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableperson
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
1st asst sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd apprentice
Asst ADR ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Dubbing rec
P. D. L.
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
The Looping Group
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Steve Martin's makeup
Steve Martin's and Diane Keaton's hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Asst to Nancy Meyers
Asst to Charles Shyer
Asst to Charles Shyer
Floral arrangements by
of Laurels
Unit pub
Basketball adv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Studio teacher
Extra casting
Voice casting
Animal handler
Prod asst
Prod asst
STAND INS
Steve Martin's stunt double
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Prints by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Father of the Bride by Edward Streeter (New York, 1949).
MUSIC
Bach "Minuet and Badinerie," performed by New Leipzig Bach Collegium Musicum, courtesy of Laserlight Digital, by arrangement Sounds of Film.
SONGS
"My Girl," written by William Robinson and Ronald White, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc., performed by The Temptations, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"What's New Pussycat?," written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, used by permission of EMI U Catalog Inc.
"Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu," written by Domenico Modugno and Franco Migliacci, used by permission of EMI Robbins Catalog Inc.
+
SONGS
"My Girl," written by William Robinson and Ronald White, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc., performed by The Temptations, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"What's New Pussycat?," written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, used by permission of EMI U Catalog Inc.
"Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu," written by Domenico Modugno and Franco Migliacci, used by permission of EMI Robbins Catalog Inc.
"Volare," written by Domenico Modugno and Frank Migliacci, English lyrics written by Mitchell Parish, used by permission of EMI Robbins Catalog Inc. and Parmit Music
"Chapel of Love," written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, published by Trio Music Co. Inc. and Mother Bertha Music, Inc., by arrangement with ABKCO Music, Inc., performed by The Dixie Cups, courtesy of Sun Entertainment Corporation, by arrangement with Original Sound Entertainment
"Perfect Match," written by Steve Tyrell and Bob Mann
"Isn't It Romantic," written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, published by Famous Music Corporation, arranged by Bob Mann
"I'm Your Man," written by Steve Tyrell and Charles Shyer, arranged by Bob Mann and Steve Tyrell, performed by David Darling
"My Girl," written by William Robinson and Ronald White, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc., arranged by Bob Mann, performed by Steve Tyrell
"(Today I Met) The Boy I'm Gonna Marry," written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Tony Powers, performed by Darlene Love, produced by Phil Spector, published by Unichappell Music, Inc. and Mother Bertha Music, Inc., courtesy of Phil Spector Records, Inc., by arrangement with ABKCO Music & Records, Inc., available on the Phil Spector and ABKCO Records release "Phil Spector Back to Mono (1958-1969)"
"The Way You Look Tonight," written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc., arranged by Alan Silvestri, additional arrangement by Bob Mann, performed by Steve Tyrell
"Beyond the Sea," written by Charles Trenet and Jack Lawrence, published by France Music Corp./Editions Raoul Breton, by arrangement with PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and MPL Communications, Inc., arranged by Bob Mann.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 December 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 20 December 1991
Production Date:
15 April -- early-July 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, a.a.d.o. the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
30 December 1991
Copyright Number:
PA550027
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31530
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Athletic shoe manufacturer George Banks is delighted by the homecoming of his twenty-two-year-old daughter, Annie, who spent several months studying architecture in Rome, Italy. Annie announces her engagement to Bryan MacKenzie, an American “independent communications consultant” who installs computers abroad. George is horrified by the thought of losing his daughter to another man and insists Annie is too young to get married, but she argues that Bryan is her true love and will never ask her to be a housewife. When Bryan arrives to meet his soon-to-be in-laws, George is determined to find fault with the young man, but his wife, Nina Banks, is impressed by her daughter’s suitor. Sometime later, George and Nina meet Bryan’s parents at their mansion in Bel Air, California. There, George goes to the restroom and finds the MacKenzies’ bankbook in an adjoining office. Startled by the couple’s growling Doberman Pinschers, George leverages himself out of the second story window only to realize he is still holding the bankbook. He attempts to throw it back through the French doors, but a maid is shaking out a rug on the balcony and the book bounces into the swimming pool. When George attempts to retrieve it, the dogs charge him, and he falls into the water. That evening, George tells Annie that the meeting went swimmingly. However, his mood continues to sour. At dinner, George suggests a picnic wedding ceremony but his wife dreams of hosting a lavish event and hires a wedding coordinator named Franck Eggelhoffer. Although Franck’s foreign accent is impossible to understand, George permits his wife and daughter to move forward ... +


Athletic shoe manufacturer George Banks is delighted by the homecoming of his twenty-two-year-old daughter, Annie, who spent several months studying architecture in Rome, Italy. Annie announces her engagement to Bryan MacKenzie, an American “independent communications consultant” who installs computers abroad. George is horrified by the thought of losing his daughter to another man and insists Annie is too young to get married, but she argues that Bryan is her true love and will never ask her to be a housewife. When Bryan arrives to meet his soon-to-be in-laws, George is determined to find fault with the young man, but his wife, Nina Banks, is impressed by her daughter’s suitor. Sometime later, George and Nina meet Bryan’s parents at their mansion in Bel Air, California. There, George goes to the restroom and finds the MacKenzies’ bankbook in an adjoining office. Startled by the couple’s growling Doberman Pinschers, George leverages himself out of the second story window only to realize he is still holding the bankbook. He attempts to throw it back through the French doors, but a maid is shaking out a rug on the balcony and the book bounces into the swimming pool. When George attempts to retrieve it, the dogs charge him, and he falls into the water. That evening, George tells Annie that the meeting went swimmingly. However, his mood continues to sour. At dinner, George suggests a picnic wedding ceremony but his wife dreams of hosting a lavish event and hires a wedding coordinator named Franck Eggelhoffer. Although Franck’s foreign accent is impossible to understand, George permits his wife and daughter to move forward with preparations for the ceremony. He soon discovers the wedding will cost $250 per person with 572 guests and orders his family to reduce the number of attendees. Storming away in anger, Annie falls asleep reading an article about budget weddings. George finds his sleeping daughter cradling a copy of Bride magazine and decides to fulfill his daughter’s wishes for an opulent ceremony. In the coming days, Franck and his crew take over the Banks home. Losing composure, George is arrested at a grocery store for removing four hot dog buns from packs of twelve. He claims it is unethical to match twelve buns with eight-packs of hot dogs. When Nina arrives at George’s jail cell, she refuses to make bail unless he agrees to embrace the wedding without protest. George agrees and preparations continue, but Annie returns home in tears one day to announce the wedding is off. Consoling his daughter, George learns that Annie was offended by her eight-month anniversary gift from Bryan, a blender. She supposes Bryan is trying to make her into a housewife and assumes the young man is a liar because he told her that George fell into his parents’ swimming pool with their bankbook. When Bryan arrives to beg forgiveness, George takes him to a bar, hoping to end the marriage once and for all, but he pities the boy and admits Annie comes from a family of “over reactors.” Returning home, George convinces his daughter to reconcile with Bryan and admits the swimming pool story was true. On the eve of the wedding, George finds Annie playing basketball outside and she confesses how hard it is for her to leave home and become an adult. Just then, it starts to snow for the first time in decades. The next day, Annie walks down the aisle on George’s arm, wearing customized sneakers from her father’s shoe company. As guests sit down to eat in a lavishly decorated tent, George is distracted by police officers who object to the number of cars parked on the street. Since the party planners are short of valets, George asks his pre-teen son, Matty, and his friend, Cameron, to drive the vehicles onto the front lawn. Back at the party, George is unable to find a quiet moment with his daughter and misses her bouquet toss. As the new couple’s limousine drives away to the airport, George realizes he lost his chance to bid Annie farewell. Sitting in his empty and cluttered living room, he receives a surprise telephone call from Annie, who says she could not leave for her honeymoon without saying goodbye and expressing her love. Cheered by his daughter’s affection, George leads Nina in a romantic dance. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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