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HISTORY

Title cards introduce the film with the following information: “On December 7, 1941, the Naval Air Arm of the Imperial Japanese Fleet, in a surprise attack, struck the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor and hurtled an unsuspecting America into World War II. American citizens were stunned, shocked and outraged at this treacherous attack. On the West Coast, paranoia gripped the entire population as panic-stricken citizens were convinced that California was the next target of the Imperial Japanese forces. Major General Joseph W. Stilwell, Commander of the Army Third Corps, was given the responsibility of defending Southern California. Army and Marine units were mobilized. Anti-aircraft defense batteries were manned and made ready. Civilian Defense operations sprang into action. For the first time since the Civil War, American citizens prepared to defend their homeland against an enemy whose first assault was expected anywhere, at any time, and in any force...”
       The following title cards identify places and times during the film’s twenty-four-hour span: “The Northern California Coast, Saturday, December 13, 1941, 7:01 A.M....”; “Death Valley, California, High Noon...”; “Daugherty Field, Long Beach, California. 2:03 P.M….”; “The Douglas Home, Santa Monica, California, 2:08 P.M. …”; “Ocean Amusement Park,” Santa Monica, California, 6:39 P.M...”; “Hollywood Boulevard, 7:35 P.M..”;. “501st Bomb Disbursement Unit, Barstow, California, 9:08 P.M…”
       Principal photography began 16 Nov 1978 in Los Angeles, CA, according to the 22 Nov 1978 Var, and ended 16 May 1979, whereupon the production began working on miniature effects, the 17 May 1979 DV noted. The 28 Apr 1978 DV and 3 May 1978 Var reported that Warner Bros. animation director Chuck Jones, best known for ... More Less

Title cards introduce the film with the following information: “On December 7, 1941, the Naval Air Arm of the Imperial Japanese Fleet, in a surprise attack, struck the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor and hurtled an unsuspecting America into World War II. American citizens were stunned, shocked and outraged at this treacherous attack. On the West Coast, paranoia gripped the entire population as panic-stricken citizens were convinced that California was the next target of the Imperial Japanese forces. Major General Joseph W. Stilwell, Commander of the Army Third Corps, was given the responsibility of defending Southern California. Army and Marine units were mobilized. Anti-aircraft defense batteries were manned and made ready. Civilian Defense operations sprang into action. For the first time since the Civil War, American citizens prepared to defend their homeland against an enemy whose first assault was expected anywhere, at any time, and in any force...”
       The following title cards identify places and times during the film’s twenty-four-hour span: “The Northern California Coast, Saturday, December 13, 1941, 7:01 A.M....”; “Death Valley, California, High Noon...”; “Daugherty Field, Long Beach, California. 2:03 P.M….”; “The Douglas Home, Santa Monica, California, 2:08 P.M. …”; “Ocean Amusement Park,” Santa Monica, California, 6:39 P.M...”; “Hollywood Boulevard, 7:35 P.M..”;. “501st Bomb Disbursement Unit, Barstow, California, 9:08 P.M…”
       Principal photography began 16 Nov 1978 in Los Angeles, CA, according to the 22 Nov 1978 Var, and ended 16 May 1979, whereupon the production began working on miniature effects, the 17 May 1979 DV noted. The 28 Apr 1978 DV and 3 May 1978 Var reported that Warner Bros. animation director Chuck Jones, best known for creating “Bugs Bunny” and “Wile E. Coyote,” was hired to suggest gags and “help with the timing,” but he is not listed in credits. Actor Steve Guttenberg was offered one of the lead roles, according to the 15 Nov 1978 HR, but he declined in favor of another film. Hollywood agent Meyer Mishkin was asked to play himself, but the Screen Actors Guild denied the request because its rules preclude agents from working as actors. Actor Ignatius Wolfington portrayed Mishkin instead. Also, director Steven Spielberg wanted Charlene Tilton to star in the film, the 10 Oct 1978 HR noted, but she was not available.
       Spielberg wanted to shoot for ten days at the fabled corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Hollywood, but “complicated logistics” of dealing with area property owners and dressing up the corner to look like 1941, not to mention the $1.5-million cost, were too prohibitive, the 26 Jul 1978 Var reported.
       In a documentary included in the DVD release of 1941, Spielberg admitted that, in retrospect, the film was “over the top.” Though generally unpopular in America, it did well overseas. According to writer Robert Zemeckis, he originally pitched executive producer John Milius an idea inspired by real events: In Feb 1942, a Japanese submarine shelled an oil field in Santa Barbara, CA, and when an air raid siren sounded in Los Angeles a couple of days later, authorities blacked out the city for six hours. Milius called the project The Night the Japs Attacked, and the title remained during the next year and a half of script development. A story line added later was based on Los Angeles’s 1943 “Zoot Suit Riots,” in which American servicemen fought with Mexican-American pachucos wearing “hipster” suits inspired by earlier black entertainers, such as Cab Calloway. Co-screenwriter Bob Gale recalled that the film began at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), with Herb Jaffe as producer, but the studio rejected the project. When Milius took the script to Spielberg, the young director was intrigued by a scene in which an amusement park Ferris wheel rolled down a pier and into the ocean. Zemeckis and Gale worked on the script with Spielberg while he was filming Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, see entry). By the eighth or ninth draft, the budget had already topped $11 million. “Wally” became the script’s unifying character. Two smaller roles—“Wild Bill Kelso” and “Hollis ‘Holly’ Wood”—were enhanced after John Belushi and Slim Pickens were cast; Belushi was reportedly paid $350,000, the 18 Sep 1978 DV noted. John Wayne and Charlton Heston were Spielberg’s first choices for “General Stilwell,” but the veteran actors reportedly disliked the film’s “anti-Americanism.” According to the 27 Sep 1978 HR, Jimmy Stewart also turned down the role. Jackie Gleason and Art Carney, former costars of the 1950s television show The Honeymooners (CBS, 1 Oct 1955 – 9 May 1971), were the inspirations for the “Claude Crumm” and “Herbie Kaziminsky” characters on the Ferris wheel, but Gleason refused to work with Carney. Zemeckis and Gale rewrote Herbie’s part for Eddie Deezen, who had co-starred in Zemeckis’s first feature directorial effort, I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978, see entry). The film was also executive produced by Spielberg and written by Zemeckis and Gale, and featured 1941 actors Bobby Di Cicco, Nancy Allen, and Wendie Jo Sperber. On the set of 1941, Murray Hamilton reportedly hated Deezen, and told Spielberg he had no problem playing the part of the Herbie-hating Claude. John Milius performed an uncredited cameo as a crazed Santa Claus. The film’s opening scene was a homage to the opening scene of Jaws (1975, see entry) and featured the same swimmer, Susan Backlinie. Spielberg also included a reference to his first television film, Duel (1971), by shooting a 1941 scene with Lucille Bensen at the same desert gas station/café location. Director of photography William A. Fraker brought the newly developed Louma crane from France to shoot miniatures and the Hollywood USO dance scene. The Hollywood Boulevard set was built on Stage 16 at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA, and Pacific Ocean Park was built on Stage 30 at MGM in Culver City, CA.
       Working titles The Night the Japs Attacked, The Day the Japs Bombed Los Angeles, and similar permutations were later dismissed because the word “Jap” was derogatory, but Universal Pictures also initially rejected 1941, because it evoked the recent, relatively unsuccessful film 1901 (1976, see entry), the 6 Jan 1978 LAHExam reported. For a time, the movie was called Rising Sun.
       Columbia Pictures and Universal pushed back the opening of 1941 from 16 Nov 1979 to 14 Dec 1979 after a disastrous preview screening for exhibitors and studio executives in Dallas, TX, according to the 31 Oct 1979 Var. Claiming the preview was a test, Spielberg re-edited the first forty-five minutes. The 16 Nov 1979 DV reported that Spielberg trimmed seventeen minutes from the film, and at the same time shot a new ending with John Belushi delivering the movie’s final line, the 7 Nov 1979 Var noted. The 12 Dec 1979 DV reported that the film’s final cost was $26.5 million.
       According to the 12 Dec 1979 Var, Universal “softened” its contractual terms with theater owners after the Dallas screening. Among the studio’s concessions was a reduction of required booking from eight weeks to six weeks.
       Reviews were mixed, but critics generally disliked the comedy, with the 14 Dec 1979 NYT complaining that “Everything is too big,” and he 19 Dec 1979 Var faulting its lack of “cohesiveness and magic.”
       1941 was nominated for three Academy Awards in the following categories: Cinematography (William A. Fraker); Sound (Buzz Knudson, Robert Glass, Don MacDougall, and Gene S. Cantamessa); and Visual Effects (William A. Fraker, A. D. Flowers, and Gregory Jein).
       End credits include the following acknowledgment: “Film excerpt from Dumbo. ” The film’s dedication is: “For Charlsie Bryant.” Bryant was a script supervisor on previous Steven Spielberg films who died just before 1941 went into production.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 May 1977
p. 1
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1978
p. 1
Daily Variety
6 Mar 1978
p. 1, 16
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1978
p. 24
Daily Variety
28 Aug 1978
p. 3
Daily Variety
18 Sep 1978
p. 3
Daily Variety
22 Sep 1978
p. 3
Daily Variety
10 Nov 1978
p. 3
Daily Variety
17 May 1979
p. 3
Daily Variety
22 May 1979
p. 19
Daily Variety
16 Nov 1979
p. 3
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1979
p. 6
Daily Variety
13 Dec 1979
p. 3, 34
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 1979
p. 3, 26
LAHExam
6 Jan 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Dec 1979
Calendar, p. 1
New York Times
14 Dec 1979
p. 10
Variety
3 May 1978
p. 33
Variety
26 Jul 1978
p. 36
Variety
22 Nov 1978
p. 28
Variety
31 Oct 1979
p. 41
Variety
7 Nov 1979
p. 14
Variety
12 Dec 1979
p. 5, 38
Variety
19 Dec 1979
p. 19, 34
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Co-Starring
Elisha Cook
Special appearances by:
as Joe
[and]
as Willy
Richard Miller
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures and Columbia Pictures Present
An A-Team Production
A Steven Spielberg Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit asst cam
Gaffer
2d unit gaffer
Key grip
2d unit key grip
Best boy
Best boy
Best boy
Dolly grip
Grip
Grip
Elec
Louma crane tech adv
Louma crane op
2d unit cam
2d unit cam
2d unit asst cam
Still photog
Still photog
Louma crane courtesy of
Filmed in
ART DIRECTORS
Prod illustrator
Addl illustration
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst ed
Apprentice [ed]
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Addl set dec
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Const coord
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop staff
Prop staff
Lead man
Lead man
Swing gang
Const foreman
Const foreman
Key painter
Key painter
Paint foreman
Sign writer
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
COSTUMES
Costumes by
Women's ward
Asst women's ward
Men's ward
Asst men's ward
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Orch mgr
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd eff ed
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff ed staff
Sd eff asst
Sd eff asst
Sd eff asst
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Sd by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff created by
Miniature supv
Matte paintings by
Visual eff supv
Opt consultant
Blue screen consultant
Miniature lighting des by
Process tech
Matte consultant
Miniature coord
Asst miniature supv
Miniature prod asst
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature prop maker
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Miniature rigging crew
Spec consultant
Spec consultant
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Titles by
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up supv
Hairstyles created by
Asst hair stylist
Asst make-up
Asst make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Casting
Scr supv
Atmosphere casting
Assoc to the prod
Prod assoc
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
Asst to Mr. Milius
Casting asst
Prod accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Weapons consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver co-capt
Tank op
Pilot
Office staff
Office staff
Craft service
Mammal and ventriloquial creations by
Ventriloquial consultant
Atmosphere casting in association with Hollywood C
Atmosphere casting
Studio teacher
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Down By The Ohio" [words by Jack Yellen, music by Abe Oleman], performed by The Andrews Sisters, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Daddy" [written by Bobby Troup], performed by The Andrews Sisters, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc. ["In The Mood," written by Wingy Manone, Andy Razaf, and Joe Garland, performed by Glenn Miller and HIs Orchestra
"I'll Be Home For Christmas," written by Kim Gannon, Walter Kent and Buck Ram, performed by Bing Crosby.]
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Night the Japs Attacked
The Day the Japs Bombed Los Angeles
Rising Sun
Release Date:
14 December 1979
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 14 December 1979
Production Date:
16 November 1978 - 16 May 1979
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc. & Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 December 1979
Copyright Number:
PA57893
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
2.35:1 [35mm]; 2:20 [70mm]
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
116
Length(in reels):
7
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Languages:
Japanese, English
PCA No:
25726
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On 13 December 1941, on California’s Pacific coast, a nude swimmer grabs onto the periscope of a Japanese submarine as it rises from the water. Commander Mitamura, German officer Von Kleinschmidt, and several Japanese sailors emerge from the hatch without seeing the woman perched above them. Mitamura wants to demoralize Americans by attacking Hollywood, but does not know his location because his compass stopped working. Meanwhile, in the Los Angeles kitchen of Malcolmb’s Café, fry cook Wally practices his “jitterbug” dance steps as he wiggles into the dining area to serve coffee to U.S. soldiers Sergeant Frank Tree, Corporal Chuck “Stretch” Sitarski, and Private First Class Foley. Sitarski is insulted by Wally’s “Pearl Harbor” Hawaiian shirt, due to the Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy base a week earlier. A fight ensues, and when the soldiers leave, the owner fires Wally and his co-worker, Dennis. At the Crystal Ballroom, Miss Fitzroy teaches her new United Service Organization (USO) hostesses, including Betty Douglas and Maxine, how to behave at the dance that night. Betty is distressed because she wants to dance with Wally, but civilian males are not allowed to attend. Elsewhere, Wally tries on a “Zoot” suit at a department store, as Dennis sneaks in with a hand-cranked air raid siren. Shoppers are already nervous because of news reports about a possible Japanese invasion, so when Dennis sounds the siren, customers and employees run, while Wally walks out wearing the Zoot suit. Meanwhile, in Death Valley, U.S. Army Air Corps pilot Captain Wild Bill Kelso lands his airplane at a highway gas station market. When he disembarks, the airplane drifts away from the pump, spilling gasoline, and Kelso accidentally ... +


On 13 December 1941, on California’s Pacific coast, a nude swimmer grabs onto the periscope of a Japanese submarine as it rises from the water. Commander Mitamura, German officer Von Kleinschmidt, and several Japanese sailors emerge from the hatch without seeing the woman perched above them. Mitamura wants to demoralize Americans by attacking Hollywood, but does not know his location because his compass stopped working. Meanwhile, in the Los Angeles kitchen of Malcolmb’s Café, fry cook Wally practices his “jitterbug” dance steps as he wiggles into the dining area to serve coffee to U.S. soldiers Sergeant Frank Tree, Corporal Chuck “Stretch” Sitarski, and Private First Class Foley. Sitarski is insulted by Wally’s “Pearl Harbor” Hawaiian shirt, due to the Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy base a week earlier. A fight ensues, and when the soldiers leave, the owner fires Wally and his co-worker, Dennis. At the Crystal Ballroom, Miss Fitzroy teaches her new United Service Organization (USO) hostesses, including Betty Douglas and Maxine, how to behave at the dance that night. Betty is distressed because she wants to dance with Wally, but civilian males are not allowed to attend. Elsewhere, Wally tries on a “Zoot” suit at a department store, as Dennis sneaks in with a hand-cranked air raid siren. Shoppers are already nervous because of news reports about a possible Japanese invasion, so when Dennis sounds the siren, customers and employees run, while Wally walks out wearing the Zoot suit. Meanwhile, in Death Valley, U.S. Army Air Corps pilot Captain Wild Bill Kelso lands his airplane at a highway gas station market. When he disembarks, the airplane drifts away from the pump, spilling gasoline, and Kelso accidentally blows up the station while chasing after his plane. At Daugherty Field in Long Beach, Major General Joseph W. Stilwell ignores intelligence warnings from his secretary, Donna Stratton, that city reservoirs are in danger of sabotage, and disregards a telegram from Colonel “Madman” Maddox stating that the Japanese have a hidden airfield near Pomona. Stilwell’s aide, Captain Loomis Birkhead, tries to rekindle a relationship with Donna Stratton, luring her into a P-17 bomber and nearly seducing her in the cockpit. Loomis accidentally drops a bomb onto the tarmac, which explodes a short distance from General Stilwell as he addresses the press. Meanwhile, Betty and Maxine return to the Douglas’s seaside family home in Santa Monica, and find Wally hiding in the garage. Maxine informs him that they can only dance with servicemen at the ballroom, adding that he would never be admitted wearing his Zoot suit. Sgt. Frank Tree’s motor pool crew arrives at the Douglas house, places an anti-aircraft gun on the front lawn overlooking the ocean, and assures them that a gun crew will arrive later. Cpl. Sitarski tries to seduce Betty, but finds Wally in the garage, and tosses him into a trash truck. As he is driven away, Wally shouts that he will meet Betty at the USO dance at 8:00. Next door, Civil Defense guard Angelo Scioli designates Claude Crumm and Herbie Kaziminsky as enemy aircraft spotters on the Ferris wheel at the nearby Ocean Amusement Park. Cdr. Mitamura sends Japanese sailors ashore to determine their position, and they kidnap Christmas tree salesman Hollis “Holly” Wood, thinking the sign on his property says “Hollywood.” Hollis refuses to tell Mitamura where Hollywood is, and when a sailor finds a toy compass prize inside the American’s box of candy-popcorn, Hollis swallows it. The sailors pour prune juice down his throat and wait for him to pass the compass, but Hollis escapes. At Ocean Amusement Park, Herbie, his ventriloquist dummy, and Claude sit atop the motionless Ferris wheel, watching for airplanes. In Hollywood, Stilwell gets a message from Col. Madman Maddox that Japanese troops are parachuting into Barstow. Loomis Birkhead convinces the general to let him drive to Barstow and make certain the crazed colonel does not commandeer airplanes. At the mention of airplanes, Donna Stratton volunteers to accompany him. Gen. Stilwell relaxes by watching Dumbo, a Walt Disney animated movie, at a Hollywood Boulevard theater. Across the street, Wally tries to get into the USO dance, but falls into the hands of Cpl. Sitarski, who is “absent without leave” (AWOL). Sitarski sets Wally’s Zoot suit on fire and drags Betty into the ballroom. On the submarine, Japanese sailors hear a radio broadcast of the USO show, and Mitamura locks on the signal to determine Hollywood’s coordinates. Meanwhile, Wally steals an unconscious Navy Shore Patrol sailor’s uniform and enters the dance. As Wally jitterbugs with Betty, Sitarski and the angry, half-nude Shore Patrol sailor beat him unconscious, sparking a brawl. At their barracks, Sgt. Tree’s men are given an assignment to drive a tank into Hollywood. In Barstow, Loomis and Donna look for airplanes, and Madman Maddox informs them he has only an old trainer aircraft with no radio. Loomis and Donna board the plane, and as it becomes airborne, Donna becomes sexually aroused. Maddox sends Wild Bill Kelso in pursuit of Loomis to find the purported Japanese airfield. Meanwhile, Loomis’s radio cannot receive calls from suspicious Civil Defense authorities, who react by contacting “Interceptor Command.” In Hollywood, Sgt. Tree and his soldiers arrive at the USO ballroom riot in a tank, where he tries to calm everyone with a patriotic speech. Meanwhile, Interceptor Command puts the American military on “Condition Red” alert, and sirens are heard around the city. In Santa Monica, Ward Douglas spots Mitamura’s Japanese submarine through his binoculars. Gen. Stilwell exits the movie theater and takes command. As Loomis and Donna make love while flying over Hollywood, anti-aircraft guns open fire. At the ballroom, Wally awakens, grabs an Army jacket, and searches for Betty, but Tree mistakes him for a sergeant and commandeers him for emergency duty. Tree is accidentally knocked unconscious in the melee, and Wally takes over the tank unit. In the air, Wild Bill Kelso chases Loomis and forces him to crash-land in the La Brea Tar Pits. Elsewhere, Ward Douglas and Angelo Scioli take control of the abandoned anti-aircraft gun. On the Ferris wheel, Claude and Herbie see the submarine, as does Wild Bill Kelso. Mistaking Kelso for an enemy pilot, Herbie fires his rifle and sets the plane on fire. Back in Hollywood, Sitarski forces himself upon Betty, until Wally knocks out the rogue soldier and embraces her with a kiss. Wild Bill Kelso crash-lands his airplane on Hollywood Boulevard and warns Wally that a Japanese submarine is anchored off the coast at Ocean Amusement Park. Wally, Dennis, Betty, and the tank crew head toward Santa Monica, and Wild Bill follows on a stolen motorcycle. When Ward fires the anti-aircraft gun at the submarine, he mistakenly shoots a hole through his own house. Angelo sends one of Ward’s boys with a key to activate the Ferris wheel and rescue Claude and Herbie, but the lad pulls the master switch instead and lights up the amusement park. Thinking he has finally found Hollywood, Mitamura opens fire on the park and deploys a torpedo that knocks the Ferris wheel off its supports. The big wheel rolls down a pier and falls into the ocean, just as Wally, Betty, and the soldiers arrive in the tank. Wally takes the vehicle to the end of the pier, and Wild Bill Kelso roars past on the motorcycle, plummeting into the water. As Cdr. Mitamura prepares to submerge, Wild Bill climbs aboard and order the Japanese to take him to Tokyo. In the morning, everyone recuperates at the destroyed Douglas house, and Gen. Stilwell commends the civilians for sinking the submarine. As Ward hangs a Christmas wreath on his door, the house slides over the cliff into the ocean. Gen. Stilwell predicts a long war. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.