Girls' School (1938)

70-71 or 73 mins | Comedy | 30 September 1938

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HISTORY

The working title for this was The Romantic Age. Morris Stoloff and Gregory Stone were awarded an Academy Award nomination for their musical score. According to modern sources, Tess Slesinger's original novella was based on her experiences as a private school teacher. ...

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The working title for this was The Romantic Age. Morris Stoloff and Gregory Stone were awarded an Academy Award nomination for their musical score. According to modern sources, Tess Slesinger's original novella was based on her experiences as a private school teacher.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
21 Sep 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
27 Sep 1938
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jul 1938
p. 22
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
29 Sep 1938
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
30 Jul 1938
p. 43
Motion Picture Herald
24 Sep 1938
p. 38
New York Times
3 Nov 1938
p. 27
Variety
28 Sep 1938
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Arthur Black
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Franz Planer
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Morris Stoloff
Mus dir
Mus score
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novella "The Answer in the Magnolias" by Tess Slesinger in Time: the Present (New York, 1935).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Romantic Age
Release Date:
30 September 1938
Production Date:
5 Jul--6 Aug 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
28 September 1938
LP8312
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70-71 or 73
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4389
SYNOPSIS

At Magnolia Hall, class monitor Natalie Freeman, who attends school on a scholarship, sees classmate Linda Simpson sneak into her room after curfew. Later, Linda tells her roommate, Betty Fleet, who cannot keep a secret, that she is engaged to Edgar, who is a poet, and that they plan to elope. Then, Miss Laurel and Miss Honore Armstrong force Natalie to turn Linda in and she is confined to her room. The dean, Miss Brewster, whom the girls call "The Duchess," summons Linda's parents. Natalie learns that they are separated and, to keep Linda from being humiliated, she meets Linda's father Alfred at the school entrance and asks him to wait for Linda's mother so that they can enter the school together. Miss Brewster urges the couple not to be too hard on Linda, who later tells them that Natalie is her enemy. Before the Simpsons leave, they agree to return together for Linda's graduation. On the night of the prom, Linda receives a bridal bouquet from Edgar, which she carries with her, and a corsage from her father, which she leaves in her room. Unknown to Linda, Mr. Simpson sends Natalie an identical corsage. At the dance, when Linda sees Natalie wearing the corsage, she accuses Natalie of having stolen hers. In response, Natalie slaps Linda, and when Miss Brewster demands that Natalie apologize, she runs away. Natalie's escort, George McClellan, a young boy from her hometown, finds her and after hearing her sob because she does not fit in, he asks her to marry him. Meanwhile, as Linda dresses for her elopement, she sees her father's nosegay still in her room. ...

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At Magnolia Hall, class monitor Natalie Freeman, who attends school on a scholarship, sees classmate Linda Simpson sneak into her room after curfew. Later, Linda tells her roommate, Betty Fleet, who cannot keep a secret, that she is engaged to Edgar, who is a poet, and that they plan to elope. Then, Miss Laurel and Miss Honore Armstrong force Natalie to turn Linda in and she is confined to her room. The dean, Miss Brewster, whom the girls call "The Duchess," summons Linda's parents. Natalie learns that they are separated and, to keep Linda from being humiliated, she meets Linda's father Alfred at the school entrance and asks him to wait for Linda's mother so that they can enter the school together. Miss Brewster urges the couple not to be too hard on Linda, who later tells them that Natalie is her enemy. Before the Simpsons leave, they agree to return together for Linda's graduation. On the night of the prom, Linda receives a bridal bouquet from Edgar, which she carries with her, and a corsage from her father, which she leaves in her room. Unknown to Linda, Mr. Simpson sends Natalie an identical corsage. At the dance, when Linda sees Natalie wearing the corsage, she accuses Natalie of having stolen hers. In response, Natalie slaps Linda, and when Miss Brewster demands that Natalie apologize, she runs away. Natalie's escort, George McClellan, a young boy from her hometown, finds her and after hearing her sob because she does not fit in, he asks her to marry him. Meanwhile, as Linda dresses for her elopement, she sees her father's nosegay still in her room. Realizing her error, Linda decides to postpone her marriage in order to save Natalie from expulsion. Then, Linda goes to Natalie's room and they both decide to stay in school, graduate and become friends.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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