Full page view
HISTORY

According to studio production notes from AMPAS library files, executive producer David Kirschner brought the original concept of the film to Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment and it attracted immediate interest. Spielberg had initiated a relationship with director-producer Don Bluth and producers Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy after seeing their film The Secret of NIMH (1982, see entry), impressed by their capacity, as former Disney filmmakers, to recreate the style of early Disney pictures. Amblin agreed to move forward with An American Tail under the condition that Bluth and his colleagues at Sullivan Studios were committed to the project. An 11 Aug 1985 LAT news item reported Bluth was set to direct, noting that negotiations began in Dec 1984. An American Tail was Spielberg’s first full-length animated feature.
       The character name “Fievel” is misspelled “Feivel” in the opening credits. According to studio production notes, Fievel was named after Spielberg’s grandfather, who immigrated to America from Russia.
       Studio production notes reported that production began in Dec 1984 and lasted two years. At its completion, the film was comprised of over one million drawings and 100,000 hand-painted cels in a palette that exceeded 600 colors. According to production notes, historical accuracy and ethnic diversity were prioritized in the development of the script.
       An American Tail opened 21 Nov 1986. According to a 4 Dec 1986 HR news item, the film was released on 1,249 screens and grossed $7.4 million during its opening weekend. Universal Pictures Distribution president, William Soady, noted that evening ticket sales demonstrated the film appealed to adults as ... More Less

According to studio production notes from AMPAS library files, executive producer David Kirschner brought the original concept of the film to Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment and it attracted immediate interest. Spielberg had initiated a relationship with director-producer Don Bluth and producers Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy after seeing their film The Secret of NIMH (1982, see entry), impressed by their capacity, as former Disney filmmakers, to recreate the style of early Disney pictures. Amblin agreed to move forward with An American Tail under the condition that Bluth and his colleagues at Sullivan Studios were committed to the project. An 11 Aug 1985 LAT news item reported Bluth was set to direct, noting that negotiations began in Dec 1984. An American Tail was Spielberg’s first full-length animated feature.
       The character name “Fievel” is misspelled “Feivel” in the opening credits. According to studio production notes, Fievel was named after Spielberg’s grandfather, who immigrated to America from Russia.
       Studio production notes reported that production began in Dec 1984 and lasted two years. At its completion, the film was comprised of over one million drawings and 100,000 hand-painted cels in a palette that exceeded 600 colors. According to production notes, historical accuracy and ethnic diversity were prioritized in the development of the script.
       An American Tail opened 21 Nov 1986. According to a 4 Dec 1986 HR news item, the film was released on 1,249 screens and grossed $7.4 million during its opening weekend. Universal Pictures Distribution president, William Soady, noted that evening ticket sales demonstrated the film appealed to adults as well as to children. The news item also reported that the James Horner, Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann song performed by Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram, “Somewhere Out There,” received regular radio airplay and topped the charts, publicizing the film and contributing to its popularity. According to production notes for the 1989 Don Bluth film, All Dogs Go to Heaven (see entry), An American Tail earned a domestic box-office gross of over $50 million, making it the "highest grossing animated feature for a first release" to that time.
       Despite the film’s box office success, critical reviews were mixed. While various publications, including LAT on 22 Nov 1986 and Var on 19 Nov 1986, praised the complex and stunning effect of the animation, they noted it’s stark contrast to the trite and underdeveloped plot.
       According to a 1 Dec 1986 New York news item, author Art Spiegelman formally accused Spielberg and Kirschner of appropriating the concept of his graphic narrative Maus . First published in 1972 as an underground comic strip in San Francisco and in Marvel Comics’ Comix Book and later, in 1986 and 1991 as a two-volume work, Spiegelman’s Maus recounts his father’s survival of the holocaust and his life in New York City after immigrating to America. Spielgelman’s characters are represented by Jewish mice and Nazi cats, but Kirschner claimed that he had no knowledge of Maus when formulating the concept of An American Tail .
       The film received particular acclaim for the song “Somewhere Out There,” which was nominated for an Academy Award for Music (Original Song) and a Golden Globe for Best Original Song – Motion Picture. It won a Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or for Television in 1988.


Academic Network Georgia Institute of Technology; student: JoAnn Yao; Advisor: Vinicius Navarro. sbc Jan 2011 More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1986
p. 12, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Aug 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1986
p. 8.
New York
1 Dec 1986.
---
New York Times
21 Nov 1986
p. 8.
Variety
19 Nov 1986
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Don Bluth Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Supv prod mgr
Prod mgr
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Created by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Prod cam supv
Cam stand engineering
Elec consultant
ART DIRECTORS
Des and storyboarded by
Graphic arts services
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Ed asst
Negative cutting
Negative cutting
MUSIC
Mus comp
Orig songs by
Orig songs by
Orig songs by
Mus performed by
London, England
Mus copyist
Mus rec
Song rec
Mus rec at
London, England
Linda Rondstadt's performance courtesy of
James Ingram's performance courtesy of
SOUND
Dial rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd consultant
Foley ed
Dolby consultant
Re-rec at
Borchamwood, Herts, England
VISUAL EFFECTS
Dir of spec photog eff
Title des
Title des
Title des
Title des
Title des
Title des
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Miniature model maker
Spec atmospheric eff
Spec atmospheric eff
Titles & opt eff
Titles & opt eff
Titles & opt eff
DANCE
Dance choreog
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Prod coord
Prod coord
Asst to Gary Goldman
Asst to Fred Craig
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Amblin controller
Prod accountant-U.S.A.
Prod accountant-U.S.A.
Asst accountant
Prod accountant-Ireland
Accounting services-Ireland
Exec asst-Ireland
Prod asst-Ireland
Studio facilities
Van Nuys, California
ANIMATION
Layout supv & storyboard asst
Layout artist
Layout artist
Background stylist
Background artist
Background artist
Background artist
Background artist
Directing anim
Directing anim
Directing anim
Anim
Anim
Addl anim
Addl anim
Addl anim
Spec eff directing anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Char key supv
Char key asst
Char key asst
Char key asst
Char key asst
Char key asst
Char key asst
Char clean-up
Char clean-up
Char clean-up
Anim checking
Anim checking
Anim checking
Anim checking
Final checking
Final checking
Final checking
Anim col stylist
Anim col stylist
Anim col stylist
Col styling asst
Col mark-ups
Col mark-ups
Col mark-ups
Paint lab supv
Paint lab asst
Paint lab asst
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Xerography supv
Key xerox processor
Key xerox processor
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Ink and paint supv
Ink and paint asst supv-Ireland
Ink and paint asst supv-U.S.A.
Inker
Spec eff asst, Anim
Spec eff asst, Anim
Spec eff inbetweener, Anim
Spec eff inbetweener, Anim
Spec eff inbetweener, Anim
Spec eff inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Char clean-up inbetweener, Anim
Rough inbetween supv, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Rough anim inbetweener, Anim
Apprentice mark-ups, Anim
Apprentice mark-ups, Anim
Apprentice mark-ups, Anim
Apprentice mark-ups, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Xerox processor, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Paint checker, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Cel painter, Anim
Xerography services
Cel paint laboratory
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Stars and Stripes Forever," by John Philip Sousa, performed by H. M. Royal Marines, conducted by Lt. Col. G.A.C. Hoskins, R.M., courtesy of Angel Records/EMI Records, Ltd.
SONGS
"Somewhere Out There (End Title Version)," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram, produced by Peter Asher
"There Are No Cats in America," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Nehemiah Persoff, John Guarnieri and Warren Hays
"Never Say Never," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Christopher Plummer and Phillip Glasser
+
SONGS
"Somewhere Out There (End Title Version)," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram, produced by Peter Asher
"There Are No Cats in America," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Nehemiah Persoff, John Guarnieri and Warren Hays
"Never Say Never," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Christopher Plummer and Phillip Glasser
"Somewhere Out There," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Phillip Glasser and Betsy Cathcart
"A Duo," music by James Horner and Barry Mann, lyrics by Cynthia Weil, performed by Dom DeLuise and Phillip Glasser.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 November 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 21 November 1986
Production Date:
began December 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc., & U-Drive Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 August 1987
Copyright Number:
PA345211
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
DeLuxe®
Animation
Duration(in mins):
80
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28317
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1885, Fievel Mousekewitz, a young mouse, is celebrating Hanukkah with his family in Shostka, Russia. As a gift, Fievel receives a cap that belonged to generations of Mousekewitz mice before him. Papa Mousekewitz regales the family with fables of the Giant Mouse of Minsk and tells them of the prosperity and freedom in a land called America, where there are no cats. Suddenly, Cossacks and their army of cats attack the town, and the mice narrowly escape before their home is burned to the ground. The Mousekewitz family flees to Hamburg, Germany, where they board a ship destined for the United States. During their long journey, Papa plays violin to entertain his family, but Fievel becomes impatient and grows weary of living on the sea. Exploring the ship, Fievel discovers a barrel of fish and Papa explains there are many kinds of fish in the ocean. Fievel is eager to go on deck to find more fish, but Papa tells him Mama is worried and they return to their community of mouse travelers. The mouse colony sings that there are no cats in America and dance in celebration of their anticipated liberation. One night during a storm, Fievel is swept away from his family by a flood of water inside the ship. When he reaches the foot of a stairwell leading to the top deck, a wave washes several fish aboard. Unable to contain his desire to see more, Fievel throws his cap up the stairway as an excuse to explore the deck while retrieving it. Although Papa anxiously chases after him, Fievel is seized by waves that ... +


In 1885, Fievel Mousekewitz, a young mouse, is celebrating Hanukkah with his family in Shostka, Russia. As a gift, Fievel receives a cap that belonged to generations of Mousekewitz mice before him. Papa Mousekewitz regales the family with fables of the Giant Mouse of Minsk and tells them of the prosperity and freedom in a land called America, where there are no cats. Suddenly, Cossacks and their army of cats attack the town, and the mice narrowly escape before their home is burned to the ground. The Mousekewitz family flees to Hamburg, Germany, where they board a ship destined for the United States. During their long journey, Papa plays violin to entertain his family, but Fievel becomes impatient and grows weary of living on the sea. Exploring the ship, Fievel discovers a barrel of fish and Papa explains there are many kinds of fish in the ocean. Fievel is eager to go on deck to find more fish, but Papa tells him Mama is worried and they return to their community of mouse travelers. The mouse colony sings that there are no cats in America and dance in celebration of their anticipated liberation. One night during a storm, Fievel is swept away from his family by a flood of water inside the ship. When he reaches the foot of a stairwell leading to the top deck, a wave washes several fish aboard. Unable to contain his desire to see more, Fievel throws his cap up the stairway as an excuse to explore the deck while retrieving it. Although Papa anxiously chases after him, Fievel is seized by waves that transform into the shape of an angry monster, and they are separated. When the ship arrives in America, the bereaved Mousekewitz family goes through immigration at Ellis Island while Fievel floats past The Statue of Liberty inside a glass bottle. Washed ashore, Fievel is discovered by Henri, a French pigeon working on The Statue of Liberty, who informs Fievel that he has reached America. Henri takes Fievel in, bathes him, and encourages him to “never say never” and search for his family. Henri’s friend, Chantal, flies Fievel to the Castle Garden Commission of Immigration. Outside, Fievel meets Warren T. Rat, a con man, who convices Fievel he can lead him to his family. Meanwhile, Fievel’s older sister, Tanya, tells her parents that Fievel is alive, but Mama is resolved to accepting his death and assures Tanya that she soon will be, too. Unseen downstairs, Warren T. deposits Fievel at a sweatshop and sells him into child labor. That night, Fievel escapes with the help of Tony Toponi, a street-wise boy mouse who dubs Fievel “Philly.” Before Tony can stop him, Fievel scampers away in search of his family and wanders the streets of New York alone. Hearing a violin, Fievel believes he has found his father, but is disheartened to discover it is only a Victrola. Back on the street, Fievel reunites with Tony, who warns Fievel not to run off again. While Fievel and Tony unknowingly cross paths with Tanya and Papa, Tanya begs Papa to play his violin so that Fievel might hear and find them. Papa refuses, however, insisting that Fievel is gone forever. Tony becomes smitten with a pretty, young Irish mouse named Bridget who speaks before a crowd about fighting back against cats. While Bridget and Tony kiss and stare into each other’s eyes, Fievel earnestly tells the crowd that there are no cats in America, but a cat creeps up from behind and swallows Fievel. On Fievel’s way down the cat’s throat, he clings to its uvula, causing the cat to sneeze and spit him out. In the aftermath of the cat gang attack, Tony tells Bridget that Fievel is looking for his family and she leads them to Honest John, a politician who, she says, knows most of the mice in the city. Bridget, Tony and Fievel find Honest John drunk and adding a dead mouse to his list of “ghost votes” when Gussie Mausheimer, the richest mouse in New York, arrives at the scene and announces she is holding a rally the next day to discuss the community’s cat problems. Bridget asks Honest John if he knows the Mousekewitzes, but he does not, so she takes Fievel home. That night, in separate parts of the city, Fievel and Tanya gaze at the sky and sing, hoping that they will be reunited. The next day at Gussie’s rally, the mice of New York, including the Mousekewitz family, cry out for freedom from cats. Although Fievel sits on stage with Bridget, the crowd obstructs Tanya’s view and she is unable to see him. When the rally is incapable of coming up with a course of action, Fievel whispers an idea in Gussie’s ear and she announces to the cheering crowd that they have a plan. In the early morning fog, the mice march into the abandoned remains of Professor Digitalus’s Museum of the Weird and Bizarre, located on the pier landing of the ship The Star of Hong Kong, and begin engineering its oddities into a secret weapon. Tony and Fievel wake up late, however, and rush to join the other mice. On their way to the pier, Fievel becomes distracted by violin music and follows the sounds into a foreboding sewer. Instead of finding his father, Fievel encounters the gang of cats playing poker, serenaded by Warren T. Rat’s fiddle. Peering at Warren T. from behind a looking glass, Fievel sees him take off his rat nose and discovers that Warren T. is a cat in disguise. After confronting Warren T., Fievel is chased by the cat gang through their sewer lair and nearly escapes, but a paw snatches him back into the manhole. At the pier, Gussie lays out Fievel’s plan. When The Star of Hong Kong sounds its horn at six in the morning and begins its departure, the mice will lure the cats to the pier and release their secret weapon, forcing the cats to retreat and board the ship destined for China. Meanwhile, Fievel is trapped in a birdcage guarded by Tiger, one of Warren T.’s feline lackeys. When Tiger hears Fievel crying, he discovers that Fievel has been separated from his family and begins to sob as well, recounting the loss of his own family. As Tiger sings about his favorite aspects of life, Fievel and Tiger realize that they have a lot in common, even though they belong to enemy species. Tiger releases Fievel from the birdcage and they agree to be friends. An alarm sounds, waking the cat gang, and they chase Fievel to the pier. Screaming to Tony and his mouse friends, Fievel wakes the mouse community at ten minutes to six, initiating their plan ahead of schedule. As the cat gang besieges the museum, the secret weapon begins to launch despite the efforts of Honest John to keep the plan on track, and Gussie faces off with Warren T. He tells Gussie that in exchange for her money and Fievel, he will make sure the cats leave the mice alone, but Fievel announces to the mouse crowd that Warren T. is really a cat. Tony uses a slingshot to knock off Warren T.’s rat nose and ears, and the mice pelt him with dishes and cutlery in disgust. Warren T. retaliates by setting the museum on fire. Just as Honest John manages to halt the secret weapon, both The Star of Hong Kong and the alarm clock set for six a.m. sound their signals. Gussie calls for the release of the secret weapon and the mice scamper to set it in motion. When Fievel finally severs the last rope restraining the secret weapon with a flame, he hits his head on a screw eye and is knocked unconscious. A roaring, mechanical monster, marked “The Giant Mouse of Minsk,” breaks from the museum’s gates amidst exploding fireworks, terrifying the cats and forcing them off the pier and into the water below. Unable to swim, the cats cling to The Star of Hong Kong’s anchor, which hoists them aboard the ship, and they begin their long journey to China. Honest John praises Philly’s plan and the mice sing in celebration that there are no cats in America. Looking on, Tanya asks Papa who Philly is, but he shakes his head in ignorance. While Fievel lies unconscious in the museum, kerosene leaks and intensifies the fire, bringing it to the attention of the mice and the human firefighters, who arrive at the pier and release their hoses. Tony and Bridget search for Fievel and find only his hat, but when Tanya hears them call the name “Philly Mousekewitz,” she suggests to Papa that Fievel’s name was changed to Philly. They chase Tony and Bridget to ask for clarification, but although Tony claims his friend’s name is both Philly and Fievel, Papa doesn’t believe Tony is referring to his son until Mama shows him Fievel’s cap. Meanwhile, Fievel awakens and tumbles through the museum floor in a surge of water from the firefighters’ hoses, safely escaping the burning building. Later, Fievel arrives at Orphan Alley and tells a group of bully mice that he is looking for his family. They convince Fievel that if his family cared about him, they would have found him already, and he becomes despondent. The next morning, however, Fievel is awakened to the sound of Tanya calling his name, but because of his stupor, he is unable to register the hopeful prospect. Riding on the back of Tiger, a search party including Gussie, Mama, Papa, Tony, Bridget and Tanya crosses paths with Fievel but they are unable to see each other in the fog. Finally, Fievel hears Papa’s voice and violin, and realizes they have come for him. As father and son reunite in an ecstatic embrace, Gussie is shocked to find herself hugging her sworn feline enemy, Tiger, but the cat is overwhelmed with joy about his new friendship with the mice. Papa tells Fievel that he never thought he would see him again, but Fievel declares “never say never” and Papa returns Fievel’s cap to his head. On the way home, the Mousekewitz family flies with Henri and Chantal past the newly completed Statue of Liberty, and Lady Liberty gives Fievel a wink. On the horizon, Fievel looks west toward the expanse of the American continent. When he asks to see the rest of America, Henri tells Fievel that he will. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.