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HISTORY

A title card in the opening credits reads: "This is the second of a series dealing with the adventures of Sally and Bill Reardon--Private Detectives." The first film in the intended series was There's Always a Woman (see entry), in which Joan Blondell played the role peformed here by Virginia Bruce. No additional "Reardon" films were made. ...

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A title card in the opening credits reads: "This is the second of a series dealing with the adventures of Sally and Bill Reardon--Private Detectives." The first film in the intended series was There's Always a Woman (see entry), in which Joan Blondell played the role peformed here by Virginia Bruce. No additional "Reardon" films were made.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
13 Dec 1938
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
20 Dec 1938
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
12 Nov 1938
p. 47
Motion Picture Herald
17 Dec 1938
p. 49, 52
New York Times
6 Jan 1939
p. 25
Time
16 Jan 1939
p. 26
Variety
11 Jan 1939
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
Jewels
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "There's Always a Woman" by Wilson Collison in American Magazine (Jan 1937).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 December 1938
Production Date:
29 Sep--4 Nov 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
19 December 1938
LP8496
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 72
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4633
SYNOPSIS

Private detective Bill Reardon has made little progress in his investigation of a series of robberies at the Nacelle jewelry store, which is owned by Francine Nacelle and her husband, along with their partner, Rolfe Davis. Bill suspects that Clarence Crenshaw is the culprit and, unknown to Bill, his wife Sally, also a private detective, has taken Crenshaw on as her own client. When Sally telephones Crenshaw to meet her at a beauty parlor, he is captured by the police. Later, the Reardons meet the Nacelles and Davis at a nightclub, where Davis intercepts a note meant for mobster Tony Croy. In the note, he finds a key with instructions to a file cabinet in the jewelry store. When Davis goes to the store to open the drawer, Croy watches as he is shot by a rigged gun in the drawer. Hoping to deflect suspicion away from the imprisoned Crenshaw, Sally steals a necklace from the store, but her plan fails when Flannigan, Bill's operative, finds Sally's broken heel at the scene of the crime. Suspicion is soon cast on Croy, in whose apartment Sally finds a cigarette case belonging to Francine. Croy turns out to be Francine's first husband, whom she never bothered to divorce. When Croy tries to blackmail Francine, she directs him to a safe that has also been rigged with a gun. When Croy opens the safe, the gun fires and he is killed. Mr. Nacelle finds the body, and when police arrive, Francine pretends to suspect her husband of the murder. When Bill discovers how Davis was killed, Crenshaw reveals that he was in ...

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Private detective Bill Reardon has made little progress in his investigation of a series of robberies at the Nacelle jewelry store, which is owned by Francine Nacelle and her husband, along with their partner, Rolfe Davis. Bill suspects that Clarence Crenshaw is the culprit and, unknown to Bill, his wife Sally, also a private detective, has taken Crenshaw on as her own client. When Sally telephones Crenshaw to meet her at a beauty parlor, he is captured by the police. Later, the Reardons meet the Nacelles and Davis at a nightclub, where Davis intercepts a note meant for mobster Tony Croy. In the note, he finds a key with instructions to a file cabinet in the jewelry store. When Davis goes to the store to open the drawer, Croy watches as he is shot by a rigged gun in the drawer. Hoping to deflect suspicion away from the imprisoned Crenshaw, Sally steals a necklace from the store, but her plan fails when Flannigan, Bill's operative, finds Sally's broken heel at the scene of the crime. Suspicion is soon cast on Croy, in whose apartment Sally finds a cigarette case belonging to Francine. Croy turns out to be Francine's first husband, whom she never bothered to divorce. When Croy tries to blackmail Francine, she directs him to a safe that has also been rigged with a gun. When Croy opens the safe, the gun fires and he is killed. Mr. Nacelle finds the body, and when police arrive, Francine pretends to suspect her husband of the murder. When Bill discovers how Davis was killed, Crenshaw reveals that he was in league with Francine, with Croy serving as their fence. Crenshaw also confesses that Francine is planning to kill Sally in the same manner as she did Croy. Bill rushes to the store and arrives just in time to prevent Sally from being killed. Bill attempts to trap Francine into an admission of guilt by having Sally play dead, but she overhears their plan and flees. With the help of Flannigan, however, Francine is captured and turned over to the police.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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