Lone Wolf McQuade (1983)

PG | 107 mins | Drama | 15 April 1983

Director:

Steve Carver

Cinematographer:

Roger Sherman

Editor:

Anthony Redman

Production Designer:

Norm Baron

Production Companies:

1818 Productions , Top Kick Productions
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HISTORY

       The 2 Jul 1982 HR announced that the film, under its working title, Lone Wolf, would begin production in Jul 1982. According to the 18 Aug 1982 MPHPD, principal photography was currently underway. On 10 Dec 1982, DV reported that Orion Pictures offered writer B. J. Nelson and director-producer Steve Carver the opportunity to base a television series on the film, referred to by its official title, Lone Wolf McQuade. However, advance sales for the film's 15 Apr 1983 release were so high that the team planned to produce two sequels before considering Orion’s offer.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that all photography took place in El Paso, TX, over a seven-week period. B. J. Nelson, intent on giving his screenplay an air of authenticity, researched the history of the Texas Rangers and spent considerable time with some of its members. Producer Yoram Ben-Ami described the film’s ideal location as having the appearance of “the old West,” but with “areas that looked modern.” Before any decision was made, Ben-Ami was contacted by the director of El Paso’s Film Liaison, who offered a great deal of assistance to the production. Among the locations was Indian Cliffs, where, according to Carver, “some of the most spectacular” sequences in the picture were filmed. Another, West Texas Airport, was adapted by production designer Norm Baron to serve as a weapons storage facility. Filming also took place in the surrounding desert, which had a high population of rattlesnakes. In one instance, a love scene between actors Chuck ...

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       The 2 Jul 1982 HR announced that the film, under its working title, Lone Wolf, would begin production in Jul 1982. According to the 18 Aug 1982 MPHPD, principal photography was currently underway. On 10 Dec 1982, DV reported that Orion Pictures offered writer B. J. Nelson and director-producer Steve Carver the opportunity to base a television series on the film, referred to by its official title, Lone Wolf McQuade. However, advance sales for the film's 15 Apr 1983 release were so high that the team planned to produce two sequels before considering Orion’s offer.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that all photography took place in El Paso, TX, over a seven-week period. B. J. Nelson, intent on giving his screenplay an air of authenticity, researched the history of the Texas Rangers and spent considerable time with some of its members. Producer Yoram Ben-Ami described the film’s ideal location as having the appearance of “the old West,” but with “areas that looked modern.” Before any decision was made, Ben-Ami was contacted by the director of El Paso’s Film Liaison, who offered a great deal of assistance to the production. Among the locations was Indian Cliffs, where, according to Carver, “some of the most spectacular” sequences in the picture were filmed. Another, West Texas Airport, was adapted by production designer Norm Baron to serve as a weapons storage facility. Filming also took place in the surrounding desert, which had a high population of rattlesnakes. In one instance, a love scene between actors Chuck Norris and Barbara Carrera was interrupted by a rattlesnake crawling into bed with them. Several El Paso residents appeared in minor roles, and nearly 1,000 others were hired as background actors.
       The 11 Oct 1982 Time reported that actor David Carradine accepted the role of villain "Rawley Wilkes" on the condition that his character does not kill the leading lady, does not die, and would not be defeated in a martial arts battle with the protagonist. Because none of these conditions were met, Carradine sued to block the film's release to protect his "reputation as a man 'possessed of boundless courage, and physically and spiritually indomitable.'"
       Lone Wolf McQuade opened 15 Apr 1983 to mixed reviews. Though several critics emphasized Norris’s lack of charisma, and compared the picture unfavorably to the work of Italian director Sergio Leone, it was the highest grossing new release of its opening weekend, earning $4.3 million at 1,221 theaters, according to the Jun 1983 Box. Norris commented on his impassive acting style in the 23 Jun 1983 Rolling Stone, explaining that his years of studying karate taught him to subdue his emotions, and he “found it very difficult to reverse that process.”
       The 18 Apr 1997 HR reported that Lone Wolf McQuade Associates brought suit against CBS Inc., Top Kick Productions Inc., and Norris. The suit alleged that Norris’s television series, Walker, Texas Ranger (CBS, 21 Apr 1983--25 Aug 2001), featured a title character with a remarkably similar personality to that of “J. J. McQuade,” and was therefore in violation of the copyright for Lone Wolf McQuade. The defendants argued that both characters reflected “general themes found in many action heroes.” A federal judge in New York City ruled that a jury trial would decide the outcome of the suit.
      End credits include the following statements: "Special thanks to drivers and members of Teamsters Local 941, El Paso"; and "Producers wish to acknowledge and thank: Dieter Gerzymisch, Indian Cliffs, Fabens, Texas; Board of Directors and Mr. Bill Thomas of Sunland Park Racetrack, N.M.; Convention and Visitors Bureau, El Paso, Bob Knight, and the city and people of El Paso; Paul Harvey, River Bend Farms; Sergio Valente; Tony Lama, El Paso; Terry Kirkendall Aviation; Eastwood Hospital; Century Martial Arts Equipment Supplies."

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jun 1983
p. 48
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1982
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 1982
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1982
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1983
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1997
---
LAHExam
15 Apr 1983
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Apr 1983
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Apr 1983
p. 4
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Aug 1982
---
New York Times
16 Apr 1983
p. 12
Playboy
Mar 1983
---
Rolling Stone
23 Jun 1983
---
Time
11 Oct 1982
p. 83
Variety
13 Apr 1983
p. 18
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Orion Pictures Corporation Presents
An 1818 Production in association with Top Kick Productions
A Steve Carver Film
An 1818 Production
An Orion Pictures Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Roger Shearman
Dir of photog
Texas dir of photog
Texas dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
B cam op
1st asst B cam
Still photog
Key grip
Dolly grip
Generator op/Driver
Grip, El Paso crew
Grip, El Paso crew
Elec, El Paso crew
Elec, El Paso crew
Crane op, El Paso crew
Crane op, El Paso crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir, El Paso crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Editing apprentice
Editing apprentice
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Painter
Swing man, El Paso crew
COSTUMES
Asst ward, El Paso crew
Seamstress, El Paso crew
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus, Sd re-rec, Goldwyn Sound Facility
Mus ed
Mus ed
Addl source mus supv
Addl source mus supv
Addl source mus supv
Harmonica
SOUND
Sd eff des
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed apprentice
Spec weapons rec courtesy of
Las Vegas, Nevada
Sd re-rec at
Dial, Sd re-rec, Goldwyn Sound Facility
Eff, Sd re-rec, Goldwyn Sound Facility
Sd mixer
Boom op
Background sd supv
Cable man, El Paso crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff, El Paso crew
Titles, opticals and negative processing by
Title concept
MAKEUP
Make-up
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod controller
Prod secy
Scr supv
Tech adv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Horse coord
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Los Angeles coord
Asst to Mr. Carver
Asst to Mr. Ben-Ami
Extras casting
Orion representative
Atmosphere controller
Atmosphere controller
Spiritual adv
Weapons consultant
Catering, Chow Biz
Animal trainer
Prod services
Craft services, El Paso crew
Projectionist, El Paso crew
Asst to Mr. Norris, El Paso crew
Asst to Mr. Carradine, El Paso crew
Asst to everyone, El Paso crew
STAND INS
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stuntperson
Stunt coord
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Lone Wolf
Release Date:
15 April 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 Apr 1983
Production Date:
began Aug 1982 in El Paso, TX.
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Lone Wolf McQuade Associates, a Greenberg Brothers partnership
5 January 1984
PA198873
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® cameras by Panavision®; Color Prints by De Luxe®
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26905
SYNOPSIS

Texas Ranger J. J. McQuade comes to the defense of a group of Texas State Troopers who have been taken captive by a band of horse rustlers. Using a combination of martial arts and high-caliber weaponry, McQuade annihilates the rustlers and takes their leader, Jefe Morano, into custody. Arcadio “Kayo” Ramos, one of the surviving troopers, thanks the ranger profusely. Afterward, McQuade attends the retirement ceremony for a fellow ranger, Dakota Brown, and shares a beer with his old friend upon its conclusion. McQuade is then summoned to the office of Captain T. Tyler, who is furious over a newspaper editorial criticizing the Texas Rangers, and McQuade in particular, for their brutal methods and lack of cooperation with other law enforcement agencies. Despite McQuade’s excellent arrest record, Tyler refuses to tolerate a “lone wolf” on his team and partners him with Kayo. Although McQuade insists on working alone, Kayo follows the ranger to his dilapidated desert home and continues to state his case until McQuade forces the trooper to leave at gunpoint. From a nearby hillside, the trooper watches in amazement as McQuade practices his highly-developed shooting and martial arts techniques. Kayo attempts to follow the ranger into town, but McQuade’s high-powered truck easily outruns the police car. Later, McQuade and his daughter, Sally, join retired Dakota at a racetrack. As Sally rides on one of Dakota’s horses, a loud noise frightens the animal into a full gallop, and Lola Richardson, a beautiful young widow, runs to the girl’s rescue. McQuade thanks Lola, who recognizes him as “the infamous Texas Ranger.” She then introduces him to her ...

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Texas Ranger J. J. McQuade comes to the defense of a group of Texas State Troopers who have been taken captive by a band of horse rustlers. Using a combination of martial arts and high-caliber weaponry, McQuade annihilates the rustlers and takes their leader, Jefe Morano, into custody. Arcadio “Kayo” Ramos, one of the surviving troopers, thanks the ranger profusely. Afterward, McQuade attends the retirement ceremony for a fellow ranger, Dakota Brown, and shares a beer with his old friend upon its conclusion. McQuade is then summoned to the office of Captain T. Tyler, who is furious over a newspaper editorial criticizing the Texas Rangers, and McQuade in particular, for their brutal methods and lack of cooperation with other law enforcement agencies. Despite McQuade’s excellent arrest record, Tyler refuses to tolerate a “lone wolf” on his team and partners him with Kayo. Although McQuade insists on working alone, Kayo follows the ranger to his dilapidated desert home and continues to state his case until McQuade forces the trooper to leave at gunpoint. From a nearby hillside, the trooper watches in amazement as McQuade practices his highly-developed shooting and martial arts techniques. Kayo attempts to follow the ranger into town, but McQuade’s high-powered truck easily outruns the police car. Later, McQuade and his daughter, Sally, join retired Dakota at a racetrack. As Sally rides on one of Dakota’s horses, a loud noise frightens the animal into a full gallop, and Lola Richardson, a beautiful young widow, runs to the girl’s rescue. McQuade thanks Lola, who recognizes him as “the infamous Texas Ranger.” She then introduces him to her lover, Rawley Wilkes, who, unbeknown to McQuade, is a dealer in stolen weapons. Rawley, a martial arts champion, invites McQuade to witness a demonstration of his skills at a party the couple is hosting. McQuade accepts the invitation, and observes with interest as Rawley handily defeats all three of his opponents. When Kayo joins the party, he is greeted with an ethnic slur by one of Rawley’s men, resulting in a brawl. McQuade subdues Kayo’s assailants, prompting a challenge from Rawley. Lola scolds Rawley and invites McQuade for a drive in her Rolls Royce; a romance develops between them. Meanwhile, on a remote desert highway, Sally and her boyfriend, Bobby Drew, witness the hijacking of an arms shipment from a military base. Before they can escape, Bobby is shot and killed, and the car is forced off an embankment, with Sally inside. McQuade is informed on his way home by a police dispatcher that his daughter has been injured. He rushes to the hospital and finds his former wife, Molly, at their daughter’s bedside, while Sally mourns the death of her boyfriend. The next day, McQuade and Kayo meet at the crime scene, where federal agent Marcus Jackson advises McQuade against interfering in a federal case. Undaunted, McQuade and Kayo abduct a hustler named Snow and take him to Dakota’s ranch for interrogation. Snow reveals that Falcon, the tiny, paraplegic Mexican mafioso who owns the racetrack, is buying stolen weaponry and selling it to terrorists. McQuade returns home to find Lola cleaning his house, and though he initially resents her interference, he soon joins in on the housework. Afterward, McQuade questions Falcon about the weapons shipment. Falcon attributes the hijacking to a friend, whom he refuses to name, then disappears behind a revolving wall, warning McQuade that Snow is about to be killed. By the time McQuade returns to the ranch, both Snow and Dakota have been killed, leaving Kayo as the only survivor of the shooting. The following day, McQuade is suspended without pay at the behest of federal agents Jackson and Burnside, for violating jurisdictional law that led to the deaths of Snow and Dakota. That night, a pair of gunmen riddle McQuade’s house with bullets and escape in a van driven by Rawley. In the morning, McQuade receives a surprise visit from Jackson, who enlists his help in locating the gunrunners’ desert storage facility. The mission is successful, and they return the next day with Kayo, Burnside, and several other federal agents. Their presence is undetected until nightfall when Burnside and his men attempt an arrest, and are shot to death. When McQuade is taken captive, Rawley orders his men to lock the ranger inside his truck and bury it in the ground. Lola, who has been abducted by Rawley, begs for McQuade’s life as she is dragged to his waiting helicopter. Kayo and Jackson defeat the last of Rawley’s henchmen while McQuade drives his truck through the heavy layer of earth that entombs him. Sometime later, McQuade receives a visit from Falcon, who announces that Rawley has kidnapped Sally. Falcon directs McQuade to the gunrunner’s Mexican hacienda, in exchange for a promise to safeguard the stolen weapons. Following his arrival in Mexico, McQuade joins forces with Jackson and Kayo, who are traveling with a truckload of weapons. They reach Rawley’s hacienda and eliminate most of Rawley’s men in the ensuing gun battle. McQuade and Rawley engage in hand-to-hand combat, and when the gunrunner is defeated, he fires at his opponent, accidentally killing Lola. Rawley hides in a stockroom and continues to fire at McQuade, but the ranger dodges the bullets and throws a grenade into the structure, obliterating Rawley and the weaponry. Falcon arrives by helicopter and is furious at the loss of his arsenal. McQuade and his team commandeer the helicopter and leave Falcon stranded. After returning to Texas, McQuade and Jackson are feted as heroes. The ranger plans to spend the day with Molly and Sally, until Kayo requests his help in dealing with a hostage situation. Molly and Sally resign themselves to McQuade’s devotion to duty.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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