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HISTORY

The 25 May 1982 DV announced plans by filmmaker Steven Spielberg to produce a theatrical feature based on the television series, The Twilight Zone (CBS, 1959 – 1964). The three segments comprising the picture would be directed by Spielberg, Joe Dante, and John Landis, with the participation of writer Richard Matheson, who scripted several episodes of the original series. Associate producer Kathleen Kennedy noted that each segment was budgeted at $3 million, requiring lower salaries for the cast and crew. The 6 Jul 1982 DV reported that principal photography began the following day, while production charts in the 9 Jul 1982 DV marked the start of filming as 5 Jul 1982. A fourth segment was added, directed by George Miller.
       On the early morning of 23 Jul 1982, while completing the final scene of the first segment, a stunt helicopter malfunction resulted in the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child actors, Renee Shin-Yi Chen and Myca Dinh Le, neither of whom was credited onscreen. The accident took place at Indian Dunes Park near Santa Clarita, CA, in a shallow stretch of the Santa Clara River. Five days later, the 28 Jul 1983 DV reported that the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) impounded all footage of the accident, and began the process of transferring it to videotape, with each frame enlarged to help determine what caused the crash. Agencies and trade unions, including the Directors Guild of America (DGA), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), ... More Less

The 25 May 1982 DV announced plans by filmmaker Steven Spielberg to produce a theatrical feature based on the television series, The Twilight Zone (CBS, 1959 – 1964). The three segments comprising the picture would be directed by Spielberg, Joe Dante, and John Landis, with the participation of writer Richard Matheson, who scripted several episodes of the original series. Associate producer Kathleen Kennedy noted that each segment was budgeted at $3 million, requiring lower salaries for the cast and crew. The 6 Jul 1982 DV reported that principal photography began the following day, while production charts in the 9 Jul 1982 DV marked the start of filming as 5 Jul 1982. A fourth segment was added, directed by George Miller.
       On the early morning of 23 Jul 1982, while completing the final scene of the first segment, a stunt helicopter malfunction resulted in the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child actors, Renee Shin-Yi Chen and Myca Dinh Le, neither of whom was credited onscreen. The accident took place at Indian Dunes Park near Santa Clarita, CA, in a shallow stretch of the Santa Clara River. Five days later, the 28 Jul 1983 DV reported that the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) impounded all footage of the accident, and began the process of transferring it to videotape, with each frame enlarged to help determine what caused the crash. Agencies and trade unions, including the Directors Guild of America (DGA), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), among others, collaborated on a report to determine the cause, as well as improve safety standards to prevent such tragedies in the future. Crewmembers explained that the helicopter, piloted by Dorcey Wingo, flew over the set as pyrotechnics exploded on the ground. It was believed that one such explosion damaged the helicopter’s tail rotor, resulting in the mishap. As reported in the 3 Aug 1982 DV, investigators discovered the aluminum covering from the tail rotor on a hillside 200 feet from the site. They had yet to determine if the helicopter “strayed from its prescribed flight path.”
       On 2 Aug 1982, DV stated that Landis, associate producer George Folsey, Jr., production manager Dan Allingham, and Warner Bros., Inc., were each fined $5,000 for child endangerment by the California Labor Commission. The 7 Oct 1982 DV reported Cal/OSHA’s issuance of $62,375 in fines to Landis’s Levitsky Productions, Warner Bros., Western Helicopters, and Twilight Zone Productions, comprised of Landis, Folsey, and executive producer Frank Marshall.
       According to the 4 Aug 1982 DV, the parents of Renee Shin-Yi Chen filed a $200 million suit against the producers and directors, as well as Warner Bros., the special effects crew, and Indian Dunes Park, among others. The victim’s mother, Shayah Huei Chen, accompanied her daughter on set, and claimed that she was instructed not to reveal the nature of Renee’s presence if questioned by the fire department. She also accused the defendants of not properly advising her of the dangers, and of disregarding “the well being, health and safety” of her daughter. Nine months later, a similar suit was filed by the parents of Myca Dinh Le, as reported in the 18 May 1983 DV.
       The 29 Sep 1982 DV announced the resumption of principal photography. Meanwhile, the NTSB filed suit against Landis, Folsey, Allingham, and Twilight Zone Productions, to force the defendants to comply with the agencies subpoena of all documentation relating to the tragedy. On 30 Sep 1982, DV reported that Cal/OSHA issued nine citations each to Levitsky Productions, Warner Bros., Burbank Studios, and Western Helicopter, for various infractions regarding the planning and execution of the film shoot. Fines ranged from $1,000 to $10,000.
       Sisters Carrie Ann Morrow and Jennifer Jason Leigh filed suit for the wrongful death of their father, Vic Morrow, on 12 Oct 1982, according to the 15 Oct 1982 DV. Their attorney, Sydney Irmas, suggested that drugs and alcohol may have been consumed on set by some of the defendants, as three empty beer cans were found at the scene. The suit was settled fifteen months later for an undisclosed amount, as noted in the 29 Dec 1983 DV.
       The 7 Dec 1982 DV reported a wrap party on 4 Dec 1982 at the Variety Arts Center in downtown Los Angeles, CA. Steven Spielberg did not attend, as he was traveling to England at the time. Three days later, the 10 Dec 1982 DV reprinted a statement from Spielberg, assuring investigators that he was not present during the mishap.
       An article in the 30 Dec 1982 DV stated that California Labor Commissioner Patrick Henning instructed his staff to place a six-month suspension on child labor permits to Landis and Warner Bros. However, the Child Labor Commission lifted the suspension for Warner Bros. after the studio paid its fine, as noted in the 28 Jun 1983 DV. On 5 Apr 1983, DV reported the FAA’s revocation of Dorcey Wingo’s pilot license, claiming his helicopter was “unairworthy,” along with eleven other violations. Wingo declared his innocence and his intention to fight the decision. Two days later, the 7 Apr 1983 DV announced that Wingo was under investigation by the Los Angeles District Attorney on criminal charges relating to the crash. Wingo responded by filing a lawsuit against Landis, Spielberg, Warner Bros., and the special effects crew, according to the 16 May 1983 DV.
       Following a grand jury investigation, the 27 Jun 1983 DV stated that Landis, Allingham, Folsey, Wingo, and special effects coordinator Paul Stewart were indicted on fifteen counts of involuntary manslaughter. All five men denied guilt, and requested preliminary hearings before going to trial, as reported in the 8 Aug 1983 DV. An announcement appeared in the 24 Aug 1983 DV, requesting donations from the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees (IATSE) to fund Paul Stewart’s legal defense.
       On 2 Feb 1984, DV quoted the NTSB report, attributing the accident to “numerous failures” by crew members, particularly the special effects technician who set off two “fatal” explosions in close proximity to the helicopter. In his memoir, The Rise and Fall of Captain Methane, Dorcey Wingo identified the technician as James Camomile, a witness for the prosecution who received immunity in exchange for his testimony. According to the 7 Mar 1984 DV, the NTSB determined that debris from the explosion damaged the helicopter’s tail rotor, and blamed Landis for not maintaining sufficient communication with the pilot. The 10 Aug 1984 DV revealed that Wingo’s attorney issued a legal brief blaming Landis and Camomile for the accident, claiming they conspired to prematurely detonate the pyrotechnics without warning the pilot.
       The 2 May 1985 DV stated that the defendants issued an appeal to the California Supreme Court to dismiss the charges against them. More than six months later, the 21 Nov 1985 DV noted that Folsey, Landis, and Allingham offered the district attorney a plea bargain, admitting guilt for the illegal hiring of child actors, and asking for the acquittal of Wingo and Stewart. Both were rejected. The 22 Jul 1986 DV reported the start of jury selection that day, nearly four years after the accident. The trial began on 3 Sep 1986. Nine months later, the 1 Jun 1987 DV announced that the five defendants were found “not guilty” of all charges. The tragedy prompted IATSE to introduce improved safety standards, which appeared in the 17 Aug 1982 DV, resulting in a substantial reduction in production-related injuries over the next five years.
       On 5 Jun 1987, DV stated that the families of Renee Shin-Yi Chen and Myca Dinh Le settled their lawsuits out of court for an undisclosed amount. The defendants made “no admission of liability or wrongdoing.” A news item in the 18 Jun 1987 DV revealed Dorcey Wingo’s intention to sue Los Angeles County for $300,000, claiming the district attorney slandered him during trial. The outcome has not been determined.
       Twilight Zone: The Movie opened 24 Jun 1983 to lukewarm reviews. The 28 Jun 1983 DV reported earnings of $6,614,366 from its debut weekend. Actor Scatman Crothers’s performance earned him an Image Award from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).
       End credits include the following statements: “ Jeopardy courtesy of Merv Griffin Productions; Video game supplied courtesy of and used by permission of Atari, Inc.”; “Filmed at The Burbank Studios, Burbank, California.”
       Actor Dick Miller appears as “Walter Paisley,” named for the character he played in several films, starting with A Bucket of Blood (1959, see entry). Bill Mumy, who originally played “Anthony” in the 1961 television episode, appears as “Tim.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 May 1982
p. 2.
Daily Variety
6 Jul 1982
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 Jul 1982
p. 10.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1982
p. 3, 24.
Daily Variety
30 Jul 1982
p. 1, 20.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1982
p. 1.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1982
p. 4.
Daily Variety
4 Aug 1982
p. 1, 4, 6.
Daily Variety
17 Aug 1982
p. 1.
Daily Variety
29 Sep 1982
p. 13.
Daily Variety
30 Sep 1982
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1982
p. 1.
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1982
p. 5.
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1982
p. 14.
Daily Variety
15 Oct 1982
p. 1, 24.
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1982
p. 3.
Daily Variety
7 Dec 1982
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1982
p. 1.
Daily Variety
30 Dec 1982
p. 1, 19.
Daily Variety
5 Apr 1983
p. 1, 14.
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1983
p. 14.
Daily Variety
16 May 1983
p. 18.
Daily Variety
18 May 1983
p. 1, 9.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1983
p. 1, 13.
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1983
p. 1, 14.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1983
p. 4.
Daily Variety
16 Jun 1983
p. 3.
Daily Variety
17 Jun 1983
p. 1, 23.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1983
p. 1.
Daily Variety
28 Jun 1983
p. 18.
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1983
p. 1.
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1983
p. 7.
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1983
p. 15.
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1983
p. 1.
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1984
p. 1, 30.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 1984
p. 6.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1984
p. 1, 22.
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1984
pp. 1-2.
Daily Variety
2 May 1985
p. 1.
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1985
p. 1, 22.
Daily Variety
22 Jul 1986
p. 16.
Daily Variety
4 Sep 1986
p. 1, 6.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1987
pp. 1-2.
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1987
p. 14.
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1987
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1983
pp. 3-4.
Los Angeles Times
24 Jun 1983
p. 1, 12.
New York Times
24 Jun 1983
p. 15.
Variety
15 Jun 1983
p. 14, 18.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Prologue
[and]
Segment 3
Featuring:
Segment 1
Segment 1
Segment 3
Segment 3
Segment 4
Segment 4
Segment 3:
Segment 4:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir, Prologue & Segment 1
Dir, Segment 2
Dir, Segment 3
Dir, Segment 4
Prod mgr, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Prod mgr, Segment 1
1st asst dir, Segments 2, 3 & 4
1st asst dir, Segment 1
2d asst dir, Segments 2, 3 & 4
2d asst dir, Segment 1
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod, Prologue & Segment 1
Assoc prod, Segment 2
Assoc prod, Segment 3
Assoc prod, Segment 3
WRITERS
Wrt, Prologue & Segment 1
Scr, Segment 2
Scr, Segment 2
Scr, Segment 2
Story, Segment 2
Scr, Segments 3 & 4
Based on a story by, Segment 3
Based on a story by, Segment 4
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog, Prologue & Segment 1
Dir of photog, Segments 2 & 4
Dir of photog, Segment 3
Cam op, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Cam op, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Cam op, Segment 1
Steadicam® op, Segments 2, 3 & 4
1st asst cam, Segments 2, 3 & 4
1st asst cam, Segments 2, 3 & 4
1st asst cam, Segment 1
2d asst cam, Segments 2, 3 & 4
2d asst cam, Segments 2, 3 & 4
2d asst cam, Segment 1
Still photog, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Still photog, Segment 1
Gaffer, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Gaffer, Segment 1
Best boy, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Best boy, Segment 1
Key grip, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Key grip, Segment 1
Dolly grip, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Dolly grip, Segment 1
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Segment 4
Art dir, Segment 1
FILM EDITORS
Film ed, Prologue & Segment 1
Film ed, Segment 2
Film ed, Segment 3
Film ed, Segment 4
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Set dec, Segments 1
Prop master, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Prop master, Segment 1
Const coord, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Set des, Segments 2, 3 & 4
COSTUMES
Cost, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Cost, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Cost des, Segment 1
Costumer, Segment 1
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
With, Mus scoring mixer
32-track digital recorder by
Digital synthesizers by
SOUND
Sd mixer, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Sd mixer, Segment 1
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Sd eng
Loop ed
Post prod dial
for Lip-Shtick
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Spec eff, Segment 1
Spec eff asst, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Spec eff asst, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Matte paintings, Segment 3
Matte artist, Segment 3
Monster eff, Segment 3
Visual eff, Segment 4
V.C.E.
Visual eff, Segment 4
Effects Associates
Visual eff, Segment 4
Monster conceptual des, Segment 4
Spec eff tech, Segment 1
MAKEUP
Spec make-up des and created by, Segment 3
Spec make-up created by, Segment 4
Spec make-up created by, Segment 4
Spec make-up, Segment 1
Make-up artist, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Make-up artist, Segment 1
Make-up artist, Segment 1
Hairstylist, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Hairstylist, Segment 1
Hairstylist, Segment 1
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Project consultant
Prod secy, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Prod secy, Segment 1
Scr supv, Segments 1, 2, 3 & 4
Loc mgr, Segments 1, 2, 3 & 4
Auditor, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Transportation coord, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Transportation coord, Segment 1
Unit pub, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Unit pub, Segment 1
Asst to Mr. Marshall, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Asst to Ms. Kennedy, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Asst to Mr. Spielberg, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Asst to Messers. Dante & Miller, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Cartoon supv, Segment 3
Cartoon research, Segment 3
Cartoon research, Segment 3
STAND INS
Stunt coord, Segments 2, 3 & 4
Stunt coord, Segment 1
Helicopter pilot
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timing
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by The Twilight Zone, created by Rod Serling (CBS, 2 Oct 1959 -- 31 Jul 1987).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Nights Are Forever," performed by Jennifer Warnes, music by Jerry Goldsmith, lyrics by John Bettis, produced by Bruce Botnick with James Newton Howard
"Anesthesia," performed by 213, music and lyrics by Joseph Williams and Paul Gordon, produced by Bruce Botnick.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 June 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 June 1983
Production Date:
5--23 July, late September--early December 1982
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 August 1983
Copyright Number:
PA185632
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo
Color
Technicolor®
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27045
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a quiet road, two men sing along to a recording of the band, Creedence Clearwater Revival, performing “Midnight Special.” When the cassette player malfunctions, the passenger offers to show the driver “something really scary.” After they park on the roadside, the passenger transforms into a monster and devours his companion. Businessman Bill Connor joins his friends, Larry and Ray, in a bar. Angry over losing a promotion to a Jewish coworker, Bill proceeds to blames the nation’s troubles on ethnic minorities. Following repeated complaints from an African American seated nearby, Bill exits the bar and finds himself in Nazi-occupied France. Two German officers demand Bill’s identification and he runs to a nearby apartment building, begging the frightened tenants for help. They betray Bill, and the officers amuse themselves by shooting at him while he is trapped on the window ledge. Bill falls into a field, where he is surrounded by members of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite his white complexion, the Klansmen perceive Bill as African American, and plan to lynch him. Bill dives into a nearby river and surfaces in a Vietnamese swamp. He calls to a squad of American troops, who perceive him as Viet Cong and open fire. The blast from a hand grenade returns Bill to France, where he is identified as Jewish and forced onto a train, bound for a concentration camp. As the train leaves the station, Bill calls to Larry and Ray in the tavern parking lot, but they cannot hear his cries for help. At the Sunnyvale Rest Home, Leo Conroy is disappointed by his son, ... +


On a quiet road, two men sing along to a recording of the band, Creedence Clearwater Revival, performing “Midnight Special.” When the cassette player malfunctions, the passenger offers to show the driver “something really scary.” After they park on the roadside, the passenger transforms into a monster and devours his companion. Businessman Bill Connor joins his friends, Larry and Ray, in a bar. Angry over losing a promotion to a Jewish coworker, Bill proceeds to blames the nation’s troubles on ethnic minorities. Following repeated complaints from an African American seated nearby, Bill exits the bar and finds himself in Nazi-occupied France. Two German officers demand Bill’s identification and he runs to a nearby apartment building, begging the frightened tenants for help. They betray Bill, and the officers amuse themselves by shooting at him while he is trapped on the window ledge. Bill falls into a field, where he is surrounded by members of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite his white complexion, the Klansmen perceive Bill as African American, and plan to lynch him. Bill dives into a nearby river and surfaces in a Vietnamese swamp. He calls to a squad of American troops, who perceive him as Viet Cong and open fire. The blast from a hand grenade returns Bill to France, where he is identified as Jewish and forced onto a train, bound for a concentration camp. As the train leaves the station, Bill calls to Larry and Ray in the tavern parking lot, but they cannot hear his cries for help. At the Sunnyvale Rest Home, Leo Conroy is disappointed by his son, who consistently reneges on his offer to let the old man spend a week with his family. Later, Leo complains about neighborhood children playing nearby, while his fellow residents discuss the games they enjoyed in their youth. Mr. Bloom, the newest tenant, cites “Kick the Can” as his favorite, and suggests they organize a game. Leo argues that their aged bodies would not survive the strain. Bloom counters that play can restore the “magic” of childhood, and all agree, except for Leo. The game begins at midnight, and within minutes, the group reverts to childhood. Only Bloom is unchanged, as he prefers his actual age while keeping “a young mind.” The children surround Leo, who is shocked by the transformation. Realizing they do not want to relive their childhoods, Mrs. Dempsey, Mr. and Mrs. Weinstein, and Mr. Mute return to old age. Only the acrobatic Mr. Agee stays a child, determined to live his dream of emulating actor Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. As he leaves the home, Leo asks to go with him, but Agee advises his friend to fulfill his own destiny. In the morning, Leo plays Kick the Can while his housemates plan the day’s activities, and manager Miss Cox searches for Mr. Agee. Mr. Bloom leaves Sunnyvale to bring his message to another rest home. While on vacation, schoolteacher Ellen Foley stops at a small-town diner for directions. In the parking lot, she backs her car into a young boy named Anthony, damaging his bicycle. Ellen drives Anthony to his home on the outskirts of town, where he lives with his parents, his Uncle Walt, and sister, Ethel. She is struck by the house’s surreal quality and the presence of televisions showing cartoons in every room. While Ellen and Anthony are upstairs, the family rifles through her purse, smoking her cigarettes and using her cosmetics. Ellen comes upon Anthony’s other sister, Sara, who he claims was crippled in an accident. He also explains his fascination with cartoons, which he describes as a world where anything can happen. Moments later, the family gathers for a dinner of hamburgers with peanut butter, ice cream sundaes, and candied apples. Ellen advises the parents that such a diet is unhealthy for a growing boy, and they are frozen with fear until Anthony agrees. Although Ellen wants to resume her trip, Anthony begs her to stay and watch Uncle Walt perform a magic trick. Uncle Walt produces a top hat and reaches inside, nervous about what he might find. He pulls a rabbit from the hat and breathes a sigh of relief, until it becomes a terrifying beast. Ellen is anxious to leave, but Anthony offers concessions to make her stay. A note falls from her purse that reads, “Help us! Anthony is a monster,” for which the adults blame Ethel. Realizing she is doomed, Ethel informs Ellen that she will become Anthony’s prisoner, as they all are. She also reveals that the boy sealed Sara’s mouth shut after she scolded him, and that he subjected his birth parents to a horrible fate. Anthony is bewildered by their hatred of him, believing they should be happy to spend their days watching television. He punishes Ethel by wishing her into “Cartoonland,” a bizarre animated world where she is eaten by a giant lizard. Ellen runs to the door, but finds it is blocked by a gigantic human eye. Anthony attempts to entertain her by making a grotesque creature emerge from the television set. When Ellen asks the boy to “wish it away,” the house disappears and the family is set free. Anthony realizes his power has not brought him happiness, and agrees to let Ellen teach him how to control it. She promises to never abandon him, and as they drive away, flowers bloom on the desolate landscape. Aboard an airliner, computer programmer John Valentine is wracked with terror as the airplane is jostled by a thunderstorm. Dionne, the senior flight attendant, gives John a sedative, hoping it will calm his nerves. While the other passengers sleep, John lifts the window shade to see a gremlin standing on the wing, but assumes it was an hallucination. Later, John looks through the window again to see the gremlin’s face pressed against the glass. His screams alert the copilot, who assures John that they will be safely on the ground in twenty minutes, even though one of the engines was disabled by lightning. John sees the creature sabotaging another engine, and throws an oxygen tank through the window, creating a loss of air pressure in the cabin. He takes the gun from an airline security agent and fires at the gremlin, but it is impervious. The beast places a hand over John’s face, then notices the clouds parting beneath them and flies away. After the airliner lands, John is confined in a strait jacket and strapped to a gurney, while pronouncing himself a hero. Maintenance workers examines the wing and are shocked to find one of the engines torn apart. As John is taken away in an ambulance, the driver listens to “Midnight Special” by Creedence Clearwater Revival, and asks the patient if he would like to see “something really scary.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.