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An item in the 27 Jan 1992 People magazine noted that Nick Castle helped develop a script for TriStar Pictures in 1988, which was the basis for Hook. Castle was set to direct the film, but was removed from the project when Steven Spielberg came aboard. The article stated that Castle was then assigned to direct Sleepless in Seattle (1993, see entry) as a “payback,” but the project was eventually assumed by Nora Ephron. Castle receives a co-screen story credit on Hook. Although the 18 Feb 1991Var stated that playwright Tom Stoppard was “about to be brought in to do rewrites," Stoppard was not credited in the final film.
       The 7 Aug 1990 DV announced Hook would be going into production with Spielberg directing in the fall of 1990 or the first quarter of 1991, depending on the availability of principal actors Robin Williams and Dustin Hoffman.
       A 16 Jul 1991 HR production chart indicated that principal photography began 19 Feb 1991. While the 29 Jul 1991 Var suggested that filming was originally scheduled to conclude in late Jul, the schedule was extended into mid or late Aug, which delayed Dustin Hoffman’s ability to report for retakes on Billy Bathgate (1991, see entry). Costs were estimated to be $50 million.
       In all, the film was in production for 116 shooting days, according to production notes in AMPAS library files. Production got underway on a sound stage at Culver Studios, in Culver City, CA, where the London sequences were filmed. The company ...

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An item in the 27 Jan 1992 People magazine noted that Nick Castle helped develop a script for TriStar Pictures in 1988, which was the basis for Hook. Castle was set to direct the film, but was removed from the project when Steven Spielberg came aboard. The article stated that Castle was then assigned to direct Sleepless in Seattle (1993, see entry) as a “payback,” but the project was eventually assumed by Nora Ephron. Castle receives a co-screen story credit on Hook. Although the 18 Feb 1991Var stated that playwright Tom Stoppard was “about to be brought in to do rewrites," Stoppard was not credited in the final film.
       The 7 Aug 1990 DV announced Hook would be going into production with Spielberg directing in the fall of 1990 or the first quarter of 1991, depending on the availability of principal actors Robin Williams and Dustin Hoffman.
       A 16 Jul 1991 HR production chart indicated that principal photography began 19 Feb 1991. While the 29 Jul 1991 Var suggested that filming was originally scheduled to conclude in late Jul, the schedule was extended into mid or late Aug, which delayed Dustin Hoffman’s ability to report for retakes on Billy Bathgate (1991, see entry). Costs were estimated to be $50 million.
       In all, the film was in production for 116 shooting days, according to production notes in AMPAS library files. Production got underway on a sound stage at Culver Studios, in Culver City, CA, where the London sequences were filmed. The company then moved to Sony Pictures Studio's Stage 30, which housed thee Neverland playground and the Lost Boys’ home. Filming then alternated Neverland tree houses and the Great Cabin of Captain Hook sets on Stages 10 and 12; then to Stage 27, where the Jolly Roger pirate ship and the surrounding Pirate Wharf were constructed; and finally to Stage 15, which housed the Pirate Town set. Although production notes state that Robin Williams and Dustin Hoffman “performed many of their own stunts,” stunt doubles Keith Campbell and Keith Tellez performed “the more complex or dangerous movements.”
       Liz Smith’s column in the 3 Jul 1991 LAT noted that Glenn Close was one of a number of stars “roped in” by Spielberg to play a cameo role as a pirate. Other cameo performers were said to include Bruce Willis, Quincy Jones, and Michael Jackson.
       Although the 18 Jun 1991 DV quoted Steven Spielberg as saying, “We are working for free. I mean free—no guarantees, just points,” the 29 Nov 1990 HR had reported that talent agreements with Spielberg, Williams, and Hoffman burdened the film with “first dollar” deals that would put thirty to forty percent of the film’s gross rentals in the participants’ pockets before TriStar received a penny.
       The 11 Sep 1991 HR stated that despite earlier rumors of a delayed release, Hook was set to open 11 Dec 1991. As noted in the 6 Nov 1991 DV, the world premiere was scheduled to take place in Los Angeles, CA, on 8 Dec 1991, as a benefit for the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital and the Peter Pan Children’s Fund.
       Critical reaction to the film was mixed, and although Sony Pictures executives were quoted as being “thrilled” by the early box-office returns, an article in the 16 Dec 1991 DV carried the headline: "‘HOOK’ BOW FAILS TO WOW." The story reported that the film took in $14.2 million on 2,197 screens its opening weekend. Although the initial rollout was not as successful as anticipated, by 26 May 1992 Hook had grossed $119 million domestically and $112 internationally according to DV. The 20 Jul 1992 HR noted that the film has passed $250 million in box-office receipts.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1990
---
Daily Variety
10 Sep 1990
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1991
---
Daily Variety
6 Nov 1991
---
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1991
---
Daily Variety
20 Jan 1992
---
Daily Variety
26 May 1992
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 1990
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1991
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1991
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 1991
p. 9, 38
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1991
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1992
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1991
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Jul 1991
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1991
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Dec 1991
p. 1
Los Angeles Times
27 Jan 1992
---
New York Times
11 Dec 1991
p. 17
Observer (London)
15 Dec 1991
---
Observer (London)
22 Dec 1991
---
Obsever (London)
8 Dec 1991
p. 22
People
17 Jun 1991
---
People
7 Oct 1991
---
People
27 Jan 1992
---
The Times (London)
8 Dec 1991
---
Variety
18 Feb 1991
---
Variety
29 Jul 1991
---
Variety
9 Dec 1991
p. 72, 76
Variety
23 Dec 1991
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Lost Boys in play:
[and]
Prostitutes:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Amblin Entertainment Production
A Steven Spielberg Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Prod by arrangement with
Great Ormond Street, London
WRITERS
Scr story
Nick Castle
Scr story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Addl photog, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Asst cam, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Asst cam, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Video eng
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Lighting tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Key grip
Best boy grip
Alan Shultz
Best boy grip
Best boy grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Dolly grip
Dolly grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Dolly grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Grip
Grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Grip, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Key rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Remote control cam systems by
Cranes and dollies by
Gyrosphere tech, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Video assist, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Video assist, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Video cable, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Still photog
Filmed in
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Illustrator
Illustrator
Illustrator
Illustrator
Art dept asst
Intern
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl editing
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Junior set des
Chief sculptor
Chief model maker
Model maker
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Drapery foreman
Const coord
Const co-ord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const equip tech
Head paint foreman
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Action prop paint
Standby painter
Standby painter, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Tool foreman
Head labor foreman
Staff shop supv
Modeler/Mold maker
Daniel L. Ondrejko
Head greens coord
Standby greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Nautical rigger
Nautical rigger
COSTUMES
Cost des
Women's cost supv
Men's cost supv
Asst cost des
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Orch mgr
Mus prep
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Sd mixer, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Boom op
Boom op, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Boom op, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Playback op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Paul Timothy Carden
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Processed eff
Re-rec
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR ed
ADR asst
ADR voice casting
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley rec
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual consultant
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Prod eff prod
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff shop supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Animatronics and puppets created by
Animatronics and puppets crew
Animatronics and puppets crew
Animatronics and puppets crew
Animatronics and puppets crew
Titles and opticals by
Spec visual eff by
A Division of LucasArts Entertainment Company
Visual eff prod, ILM
Art dir, ILM
Supv matte artist, ILM
Opt photog supv, ILM
Digital eff supv, ILM
Plate photog supv, ILM
Post photog supv, ILM
Key eff photog, ILM
Bluescreen unit mgr, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Eff cam supv, ILM
Motion/Wing supv, ILM
Motion/Wing supv, ILM
Computer graphic supv, ILM
CG fire removal supv, ILM
Digital scanning supv, ILM
Anim supv, ILM
Modelshop supv, ILM
Rotoscope supv, ILM
Exec in charge of post prod, ILM
Exec in charge of prod, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Opt dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Digital dept, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Cam dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Stage dept, ILM
Eff cam, ILM
Eff cam, ILM
Eff cam, ILM
Eff cam, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Eff anim, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Scanning, ILM
Scanning, ILM
Scanning, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Richard Miller
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Model dept, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Rotoscope, ILM
Editorial, ILM
Editorial, ILM
Editorial, ILM
Storyboard artist, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Prod coord, ILM
Dept coord, ILM
Dept coord, ILM
Dept coord, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
DANCE
Choreog
Action choreog
Addl choreog
Addl choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up supv
Monty Westmore
Asst make-up supv
Asst make-up supv
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Julia Roberts' make-up
Body make-up
Spec make-up created by
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Cannom Creations shop crew
Hair supv
Asst hair supv
Asst hair supv
Julia Roberts' hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Prod office coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
DGA trainee
Prod's assoc
Prod's assoc
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Ship rigging consultant
Armor des by
Armor tech
Armor tech
Armor tech
Armor tech
Armor tech
Armor tech
Craft service
Craft service
Craft service
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Const accountant
Payroll accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
Secy to Mr. Spielberg
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Mr. Marshall
Asst to Mr. Hoffman
Asst to Mr. Williams
Asst to Ms. Roberts
Dialect coach to Mr. Hoffman
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal trainer
Supv teacher
Teacher
Teacher
Teacher
Teacher
Unit security supv
Skateboard tech adv
Cablecam Systems tech
Fitness trainer to Mr. Williams
Martin Cohen
Post-prod supv
Post-prod coord
Sword tech adv
Sword tech adv
Sword tech adv
Process compositing by
Prod liaison, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
Prod liaison, Bluescreen unit - Los Angeles
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stand-in for Mr. Hoffman
Stand-in for Mr. Williams
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Peter Pan (New York, 6 Nov 1905) and books by J. M. Barrie.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"We Don't Wanna Grow Up," music by John Williams, lyrics by Leslie Bricusse; "When You're Alone," music by John Williams, lyrics by Leslie Bricusse; "Pick'em Up," music by John Williams, lyrics by Leslie Bricusse; "Take Me Out to the Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth & Albert Von Tilzer.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 December 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 8 Dec 1991; Los Angeles and New York opening: 11 Dec 1991; London opening: 3 Apr 1992
Production Date:
19 Feb--mid or late Aug 1991
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
TriStar Pictures, Inc.
23 January 1992
PA551444
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by de luxe® and Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
142
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31538
SYNOPSIS

During the Christmas season, high-powered corporate lawyer Peter Banning, his wife, Moira, and twelve-year-old son Jack watch a school production of J. M. Barrie’s play, Peter Pan, in which his daughter, Maggie, appears as “Wendy.” During the performance, Banning answers a call on his cellular telephone from a co-worker asking him to attend an impromptu morning meeting. Peter protests, as he is set to leave for London, England, with his family, where an orphans’ hospital will be dedicating a new wing to his “Granny,” Wendy Angela Darling. He finally relents, but Jack reminds his dad that he has already promised to attend his final “Santa Series” baseball game. The next morning, Peter sends an aide to videotape Jack’s game while his employees joke with him about his fear of flying. When Jack realizes his father is not in the stands, he strikes out, causing his team to lose. Once Peter finally arrives, Jack’s game is long over. Onboard the airplane, the flight runs into turbulence above the Atlantic Ocean, and Peter is less than pleased when Maggie shows him a drawing Jack made of their plane crashing, with all in the family except Peter parachuting to safety. At his wife’s urging, Peter talks to Jack and promises to attend six of his games next season. In London, the Bannings arrive at Granny Wendy’s home. Because it has been ten years since Peter’s last visit, she reminds him they all must observe the only house rule: “No growing up.” That night, Peter returns to the bedroom ...

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During the Christmas season, high-powered corporate lawyer Peter Banning, his wife, Moira, and twelve-year-old son Jack watch a school production of J. M. Barrie’s play, Peter Pan, in which his daughter, Maggie, appears as “Wendy.” During the performance, Banning answers a call on his cellular telephone from a co-worker asking him to attend an impromptu morning meeting. Peter protests, as he is set to leave for London, England, with his family, where an orphans’ hospital will be dedicating a new wing to his “Granny,” Wendy Angela Darling. He finally relents, but Jack reminds his dad that he has already promised to attend his final “Santa Series” baseball game. The next morning, Peter sends an aide to videotape Jack’s game while his employees joke with him about his fear of flying. When Jack realizes his father is not in the stands, he strikes out, causing his team to lose. Once Peter finally arrives, Jack’s game is long over. Onboard the airplane, the flight runs into turbulence above the Atlantic Ocean, and Peter is less than pleased when Maggie shows him a drawing Jack made of their plane crashing, with all in the family except Peter parachuting to safety. At his wife’s urging, Peter talks to Jack and promises to attend six of his games next season. In London, the Bannings arrive at Granny Wendy’s home. Because it has been ten years since Peter’s last visit, she reminds him they all must observe the only house rule: “No growing up.” That night, Peter returns to the bedroom where he slept as a boy, but his reverie is broken by another call from his co-worker. When the children continue to pester him during the call, Peter loses his temper and demands Moira take them out of the room. When the phone rings again, she rips it from his grasp and throws it out the window into the snow, admonishing her husband for missing the brief time in life when their children will actually want them to be around. Later, Peter and Moira escort Granny Wendy to the dedication banquet, leaving the children at home. Addressing the attendees in a heartfelt speech, Peter reflects on his upbringing with Granny Wendy, who cared for him before he found adoptive parents. When they return home, the Bannings discover Maggie and Jack have been kidnapped and taken to the mythical world of Neverland by the evil Captain Hook. Pouring himself a stiff drink, Peter returns to his childhood nursery and goes out onto the balcony. Suddenly, a fairy sprite named Tinkerbell flies inside and urges Peter to follow her. To her disappointment, however, Peter insists he has grown up and does not believe in fairies. Having no other choice, Tinkerbell knocks him unconscious, wraps him in a blanket, and carries him to Neverland herself. Shortly after arriving on the magical island, Peter disguises himself as a pirate and sneaks aboard Captain Hook’s ship just as Hook’s first mate, Smee, introduces their nefarious, one-handed leader to the crew. The captain announces that he has the children in his possession, and intends to kill Peter, his former adversary, when he comes to their rescue. When Jack and Maggie are hauled onto the deck, Peter reveals his identity and clumsily fails to save them. Pirates drag Peter to the presence of Captain Hook, but he has trouble convincing the captain that he is Hook’s onetime opponent, Peter Pan. Hook has the children raised high above the deck in a rope net and promises to release them when Peter flies up and touches them. Because Peter does not know how to fly, he climbs the mast in attempt to fulfill his part of the bargain. As he crawls out on a yardarm to reach his children, he slips and nearly falls. Hook decides to call off his war with Pan and do away with Peter as well as the children, but Tinkerbell intervenes, promising to get Peter into shape within a week. She taunts Hook for appearing cowardly, and he quickly agrees to the deal. To train, Peter arrives at the treehouse occupied by Tinkerbell and his former friends, the rambunctious Lost Boys, who ridicule him for growing old and gaining weight. Meanwhile, Smee convinces Hook to act in such a way that Peter’s children will come to hate their father and love the pirate, thus forcing Peter to fight to regain their affection. The Lost Boys, in turn, tease Peter until he remembers how to use his imagination. Rufio, the boys’ current leader, becomes jealous of Peter’s newfound popularity and throws a coconut at Peter’s head. Regaining his youthful reflexes, Peter grabs a sword and slices the coconut in half before it strikes him. Eventually, he begins to remember his past life as Peter Pan. That night, the soft ticking of Jack’s pocket watch triggers traumatic memories for Hook as he continues to live in fear of the crocodile that chewed off his hand after he forced it to swallow an alarm clock. Just before he is about to gut Jack with his hook, Smee reminds the captain that he killed the crocodile years before. Hook takes Jack to a clock shop where all the merchandise has already been broken. When one clock starts to tick, Smee and Hook encourage Jack to smash the clocks himself, for all the times his father broke his promises. To win the boy’s affection, Hook arranges a baseball game and cheers Jack when he scores a home run. Peter watches from behind the stands, and becomes upset that his son has developed an attachment to the evil pirate. Back at the treehouse, Peter determines he needs to relearn how to fly. Although initially unsuccessful, Jack’s home run ball plummets back down to Earth and strikes Peter on the head. When he revives, he sees the reflection of the boy he once was — Peter Pan — looking back at him in a shallow pond. Snatching the baseball from the water, Peter sees Pan’s shadow, which leads him to the underground house he built with the Lost Boys for Wendy Darling. Memories suddenly flood back to Peter: After running away as an orphan, he was rescued by Tinkerbell, who brought him to Neverland, where children remain the same age forever. Eventually, he grew to miss his mother, but returned home and discovered he had been long forgotten. He visited other homes and got to know Wendy and her brothers, John and Michael. After their frequent adventures, he returned every year until Wendy became old and forgot how to fly. One night, elderly Wendy introduced Peter to her own sleeping granddaughter, Moira. Peter gave her a kiss, which began his journey to adulthood. Ultimately, Peter decided to stay with Wendy and grow up because he wanted to be a father, and the happy thought that he now has children of his own lifts him off the ground. The power of flight restored, Peter returns to Hook’s ship. Jack does not initially recognize his father, but as the battle begins, he realizes how much Peter truly loves him. With Peter in danger of losing the fight, the Lost Boys come to his aid. As Rufio prepares to duel, Captain Hook knocks the boy’s sword from his hand and stabs him through the heart. With his dying breath, Rufio wishes he had a father like Peter. Overhearing the boy’s wish, Jack has a change of heart and tells Peter he wants to go home. Peter turns his back on his adversary to retrieve Jack and Maggie, but Hook promises to track them down wherever they go. Peter returns to fight. As he hones his hook on a sharpening stone, the pirate captain berates Peter, telling him that his adventure is only a dream, and when he wakes up he will be the same tired, middle-aged businessman he was before. The Lost Boys believe in Peter, however, and Peter takes the pirate’s sword. As he returns the weapon, Hook slices Peter’s wrist with the sharpened hook. Peter promises to end the fight just as the Lost Boys arrive with several ticking and ringing clocks. In Hook’s panic, Peter knocks off the Pirate’s hat and wig, revealing him to be an old, balding man. He threatens to kill Hook, but instead decides to exile him from Neverland. As the Bannings walk away, Hook attempts to revive the fight. Tinkerbell distracts him, and he embeds his infernal appendage into a giant crocodile statue in the town square. The statue topples over, trapping the captain between its jaws. Peter celebrates with the Lost Boys, but realizes he must return to the real world. Peter, Jack, and Maggie fly off with Tinkerbell leading the way. Back in London, Moira is asleep in her chair in the nursery keeping vigil. The children return, and when she awakens, they have been tucked safely into their beds. Peter lands in the snowy lawn next to his discarded cell phone and climbs the drainpipe to the nursery balcony. A changed man, he tosses his phone out the window to concentrate on his family. Granny Wendy greets him with "Hello, boy," as she did so many years ago, and they share a tearful embrace.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.